Ospreys at Cors Dyfi

We left Ynys Hir around mid-afternoon and headed up the road to the Dyfi Osprey Project. The project which started in 2009 is run by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust run project. We had an enjoyable hour at Cors Dyfi with both Ospreys being seen during the visit from the very impressive, recently constructed viewing platform.  We also had a number of smaller birds such as Siskins and Redpolls. The site is well worth a visit and hopefully it will only be a matter of time before Ospreys spread out into the nearby countryside. See link below for further info on the project.

Cors Dyfi Ospreys

Osprey 1, Cors Dyfi, 4 June 2016

Osprey, Cors Dyfi, 4 June 2016

Osprey 2, Cors Dyfi, 4 June 2016

Osprey, Cors Dyfi, 4 June 2016

Cors Dyfi Viewing Platform

Cors Dyfi Osprey Viewing Platform

Redpoll 1, Cors Dyfi, 4 June 2016

Redpoll, Cors Dyfi, 4 June 2016

  Steve C

Wood and Willow Warblers at Ynys Hir

As I mentioned in the last post it was rather quiet when we first arrived at Ynys Hir. To be fair maybe the first week of June was a fraction late for the full dawn chorus. No doubt plenty of the breeding birds were already busy with the business of raising a family. That said as it warmed up we did get more bird song. Blackcaps, Garden Warblers and Chiffchaffs were all in good voice, but the overall winner had to be the Willow Warbler. Probably every 100 yards or so producing a new bird bursting into song. The bird photographed below wasn’t singing. As you can see it was busy feeding a family. I watched it flit from a patch of scrub to the same part of the fence line on three occasions. The third time being the one where I just stood still near the fence and the bird duly flew in a few minutes later. It would feed in among the deep grass at the fence line, pop up onto the wire before departing back with it beak full of food. I actually over exposed the shots due to wrong camera settings, (nothing new there), so I have toned them down. The colour though is original, the bird was as stunning as it appears.

Willow Warbler 1, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Willow Warbler, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Willow Warbler 3a, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Willow Warbler, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

When we got back into the wood we had our only Wood Warbler of the day. The bird was not singing fully, but as with the Willow Warbler was busy taking food to a nest. We watched for about 15 minutes and every couple of minutes the bird would fly in to a perch near the nest, it would then sing the first part of its song, (the coin spin), before flying down to the nest itself. We were not sure if the bird was maybe the adult male coming in to feed an incubating female. Possibly letting the female know it was him approaching. We could not understand why he would sing if he was feeding chicks and alerting potential predators to the nest position.

Wood Warbler 1, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Wood Warbler, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Wood Warbler 2, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Wood Warbler, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

We also had several Pied Flycatchers in the wood but none were too keen on having their picture taken. A quick snap of a female, the best I could manage. The Reed Bunting was not as shy as the Flycatcher and happily posed for a few shots on one of the boardwalk rails.

Pied Flycatcher 1, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Pied Flycatcher, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Reed Bunting 2, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Reed Bunting, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Reed Bunting 1, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Reed Bunting, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Ynys Hir 1

Iris Pseudacorus at Ynys Hir

Ynys Hir 3

Iris Pseudacorus at Ynys Hir

The last couple of shots are of Hawk Moths. A local group had set up a trap overnight and when we returned to the visitor centre they were showing off their night’s captures. I have to say I was very impressed. There was literally 100’s of moths in the trap. Including three or four different Hawk Moth species. No doubt Slasher will give a full brief in due course………Not !! Don’t know if I’m qualified to say it; but Good Mothing.

Poplar Hawk Moth 1, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Poplar Hawk Moth, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Elephant Hawk Moth 1, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Elephant Hawk Moth, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Ynys Hir 2

The Mothing Group, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016. Note Slasher deep in moth dits to the left.

Steve C

Grass Snake at Ynys Hir

We were up bright and early on the Saturday morning, arriving at RSPB Ynys Hir just before seven.  The woodland behind the reserve building was rather quiet so we quickly headed down towards the Breakwater Hide. As we walked through a small marshy area adjacent to a hide which was temporarily closed, I spotted a Grass Snake on top of a mound of reeds; maybe it’s nest? It was still rather cool and this enabled us to get a few snaps without the snake disappearing into cover. That said, the Grass Snake was aware of our presence, but we kept a sensible distance so it did not feel threatened. Always a good day when you come across a British Snake out in the open.

Grass Snake 1, Ynis Hir, 4 June 2016

Grass Snake, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

The image above was on the way out to the Breakwater Hide and thankfully on our return it was still basking and had also changed position slightly.

Grass Snake 2, Ynis Hir, 4 June 2016

Grass Snake, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Grass Snake 3, Ynis Hir, 4 June 2016

Grass Snake, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Grass Snake 4, Ynis Hir, 4 June 2016

Grass Snake, Ynys Hir, 4 June 2016

Steve C

Netted Pug on Portsdown Hill and Buttoned Snout in Fareham Garden

The recent highlight from the 40W Actinic Heath Trap, paid for by the Tax Payer, I operate at work on Portsdown Hill was a single Netted Pug.  It is an extremely smart moth, particularly for a pug.  The species has only been recorded a handful of times annually within the county.  Unsurprisingly, it was a ‘lifer’ for me.

Netted Pug, Portsdown Hill – 9 Jun 16

My eleventh record of Light Feathered Rustic (nationally scarce B) was also notable.  It was an extremely fresh specimen despite it being towards the end of the species flight period.

Light Feathered Rustic, Portsdown Hill – 13 Jun 16.  The eleventh specimen.

Back at home the recent highlight has been a single Buttoned Snout.  It is also a nationally scarce B species and was yet another ‘lifer’.  Considering the specimen would have hibernated over the winter it was still in pretty good condition.

Buttoned Snout, Fareham Garden – 8 Jun 16

Good mothing,

Tony T   BSc (Hons) GeoSci (Open)

Red Kites feeding at Bwlch Nant yr Arian

We left Borth Bog around two in the afternoon and half an hour later pulled into Bwlch Nant yr Arian. This has been the site of a Red Kite feeding station since the late 90’s. This was only my second visit, (the first with a digital camera). It really is a great spot to see Kites. Very scenic and the new visitor centre and café is well worth a visit. The only cost is a couple of pounds for parking so exceptional good value considering there was at least 150 Red Kites on view. At three o’clock sharp the feeding started and the Kites which had been loitering in the vicinity for the last half an hour were soon diving down on the offerings. I know there are pros and cons to the feeding of the birds but it was nice to see just how many families were watching and on the whole the kids were very excited at seeing the birds, as I said a great spectacle and well worth a trip if you are in the area.

Nant Yr Arian

Bwlch Nant yr Arian

Red Kites, Nant Yr Arian, 3 June 2016

One minute to three

   Conditions on the whole were pretty good and in the end I managed to shoot off around 700 images. My only issue, (other than which of the many birds to aim for) was the need to over-expose for birds against the sky, whilst not forgetting to revert back to normal exposure for birds against the trees and hillside. Needless to say I managed to muck up a good percentage of the shots. That said I got a few decent images and hopefully now I will be visiting the are more often, I can hone my skills on future visits. The images below are all of Red Kites taken on the 3rd June at Bwlch Nant yr Arian so I won’t label them individually.

Red Kite 3a, Nant yr Arian, 3 Jun 2016 Red Kites 2, Nant yr Arian, 3 Jun 2016 Red Kite 2a, Nant yr Arian, 3 Jun 2016 Red Kites 1, Nant yr Arian, 3 Jun 2016 Red Kites 4, Nant yr Arian, 3 Jun 2016 Red Kite 5, Nant yr Arian, 3 Jun 2016

Red Kite 10, Nant yr Arian, 3 Jun 2016 Red Kite 7a, Nant yr Arian, 3 Jun 2016 Red Kite 12, Nant yr Arian, 3 Jun 2016

 Steve C

Ceridigeon Weekend: Oystercatcher breeding on the railway lines at Cors Fochno

After leaving Clarach Cliffs, we made the short journey north towards the seaside village of Borth, and more specifically to Cors Fochno (Borth Bog), a raised peat bog just inland of the village. We parked up near the boat yard and walked along the footpath adjacent to the train line. As we approached the footbridge, an Oystercatcher flushed from beside the rails and landed on a nearby fence giving plenty of vocal alarm. We guessed the bird must have a nest nearby but we could not see it. During our visit three trains passed by her position. When we returned after our visit she was still in the same area, actually standing on the tracks at one point. She obviously had a nest very close to the rails but we did not want to disturb her any more than was necessary to walk by so we left her to it.

Oystercatcher 1a, Borth Bog, 3 June 2016

Oystercatcher, Borth Bog, 3 June 2016

Oystercatcher 2, Borth Bog, 3 June 2016

Oystercatcher, Borth Bog, 3 June 2016

Oystercatcher 3a Borth Bog, 3 June 2016

Oystercatcher, Borth Bog, 3 June 2016

Borth Bog Train 2

The 08:15 from Shrewsbury

Borth Bog Train

Did I mention I used to be a train spotter !!

Below is a link to the Ceridigeon Birds Blog where a local birder managed to get a snap of the bird and train together.

Railway Oystercatcher

After initially leaving the Oystercatcher we walked along the edge of the river towards Borth itself. The reserve was rather quiet to be fair but we did pick up new day birds in the form of Reed Bunting, Reed and Sedge Warbler; three birds you would expect in this habitat. We did have a 15 minute break at the end of the walk listening for Cetti’s Warblers but nothing was heard from me. Slash took the opportunity to recharge his batteries. Driving for a whole hour had left him completely exhausted.

Borth Bog

Borth Bog

Reed Bunting 1a, Borth Bog, 3 June 2016

Reed Bunting, Borth Bog, 3 June 2016

Borth Bog Sleeping Slasher

Give me another 5 minutes Coppo

Steve C

Black-headed Gull chick taken by a Lesser Black-backed Gull at Hook with Warsash

It was during a long overdue visit to Hook with Warsash at the weekend that I heard a cacophony of noise from the resident Black-headed Gulls at Links Scrape.  At the time I was to the east of the scrape and the cause of the commotion wasn’t obvious.  However, all became clear on my arrival as a previously unseen Lesser Black-backed Gull on the water tried unsuccessfully to swallow a Black-headed Gull chick.  Although the majority of birds had long settled back down the culprit was still being mobbed by a presumed robbed pair of Black-headed Gulls.  Eventually, the ‘Lesser’ had to swim to the shore where it pecked at its prize for a bit before finally swallowing it still whole, and reassuringly showed its yellow legs.

Lesser Black-backed Gull, Hook with Warsash – 11 Jun 16

Lesser Black-backed Gull, Hook with Warsash – 11 Jun 16

Lesser Black-backed Gull, Hook with Warsash – 11 Jun 16

Lesser Black-backed Gull, Hook with Warsash (swimming to shore) – 11 Jun 16

Good birding,

Tony T   BSc (Hons) GeoSci (Open)

Chough and Grasshopper Warbler at Clarach Cliffs, Ceridigeon.

Last weekend I drove over the border to visit distant Amigo Slasher in mid-Wales. No need to tell you that we had a great weekend’s birding as well as the odd tipple or two. I set a target to see 100 species over the weekend which I knew would be a challenge but we thought we would give it a go. An early morning visit to his local wood, where we picked up a decent number of common species including plenty of singing warblers; Blackcap, Garden, Willow, Chiffchaff and Whitethroat all making the list. The local river just along the road produced Dipper. A pretty sure bet as Slasher knew they were nesting in a box under the bridge.

Aberystwyth from Constitution Hill

Aberystwyth from Constitution Hill

We then drove in the direction of Aberystwyth and arrived at Clarach Bay. Oystercatcher and Rock Pipit where quickly seen on the rocky beach before we headed south along the coastal path towards Constitution Hill. As we gained height we picked up a family of Stonechats, both adults feeding three immature birds. In fact everywhere we subsequently visited we had Stonechats feeding young so it looks like a good start to their  breeding season. We were soon on top of the cliffs and one of the local Chough population gave us a fly by. In fact it did a couple, before settling on a grassy bank adjacent to the coastal path where it fed for a few minutes before getting flushed by the next people to pass.

Chough 2, Clarach Cliffs, 3 June 2016

Chough, Clarach Cliffs, 3 June 2016

Chough 4, Clarach Cliffs, 3 June 2016

Chough, Clarach Cliffs, 3 June 2016

 We arrived at the top of Constitution Hill and the views over Aberystwyth were stunning, as the town bathed in the June sunshine, (see top image). We also picked up a Wheatear from the top of the hill and had several Barn Swallows hunting over the fields. A family party of Ravens headed north past our position, as we turned and headed back to the car.

Near the radar station we picked up the second Grasshopper Warbler of the morning, (the first was a skulker). This one perched out in the open as it reeled away. The bird remained here for a good minute or so before diving back into cover. Along with the Chough this is another bird I do not routinely see, so the Clarach Cliffs will certainly be visited again.

Grasshopper Warbler 1, Clarach Cliffs, 3 June 2016

Grasshopper Warbler, Clarach Cliffs, 3 June 2016

Grasshopper Warbler 3, Clarach Cliffs, 3 June 2016

Grasshopper Warbler, Clarach Cliffs, 3 June 2016

Steve C

Emergent captive Elephant Hawk-moth

In September last year I spotted an Elephant Hawk-moth caterpillar as it crossed the garden patio presumably in search of a place to pupate.  Having developed a keen interest in moths it had become an intension of mine to one day keep a caterpillar and witness the truly remarkable process of metamorphism.  This particular encounter appeared to be an ideal opportunity to fulfil that ambition.  Consequently, I placed some dirt, wood chips, twigs, leaves and fuschia stems (alternative food plant) into a small container and placed the caterpillar inside.

The following day I inspected the container that I had placed in a shaded spot on the floor of the garage.  My assumption that the caterpillar had been on the lookout for a place to pupate was confirmed as it had loosely woven a couple of twigs and detritus around itself.  I removed the wilted fuschia stems, placed a few leaves over the caterpillar and except for ensuring the contents remained damp through the winter left it well alone.

Elephant Hawk-moth caterpillar, Fareham Garden – 19 Sep 15.  (‘Elephant trunk’ partially extended)

 

Elephant Hawk-moth caterpillar, Fareham Garden – 19 Sep 15.  (‘Elephant trunk’ recessed bulging the ‘eyes’)

It wasn’t until early May that I took a record shot of the pupa aware that adult Elephant Hawk-moths emerge from early May.  It was as I exposed the pupa from the woven detritus that I first became aware of a large worm that must have been amongst the material I had placed in the container.  Paranoid that I might be oblivious to the emergent adult I relocated the container to the kitchen on top of one of the wall units.  Each morning I checked for any activity but apart from the appearance of two small cranefly like insects that must also have been amongst the detritus as eggs nothing happened.

Elephant Hawk-moth pupa, Fareham Garden – 12 May 16

It wasn’t until Sunday 5 Jun 16 that Mrs T informed me that ‘Eric’ had emerged.  Although I had placed a small branch in the container for the newly emerged adult moth to climb, I found it frantically moving around the base of the container.  Its wings were no more than deformed stumps and the inside of the vacated pupa was surprisingly very moist with a milky like liquid.  Conscious that the adult moth probably wanted to climb something more substantial from where it could inflate its wings, I placed ‘Eric’ on a tree trunk where it immediately settled.  Mistakenly I opted to process my moth trap catch before I took any images.  Unfortunately, by the time I returned the wings, held above its body like a butterfly, were already well expanded.

Elephant Hawk-moth pupa (empty), Fareham Garden – 5 Jun 16

Elephant Hawk-moth (freshly emerged expanding its wings), Fareham Garden – 5 Jun 16

After the success of this particular project I suspect I’ll be ‘rearing’ more caterpillars in the future.

Elephant Hawk-moth (record image), Fareham Garden – 3 Jun 11

Good mothing,

Tony T   BSc (Hons) GeoSci (Open)

Marsh Harriers at Radipole Lake

With Portland in the rear view mirror, I decided to call in at the Weymouth hotspots of Radipole Lake and Lodmoor on my way home to Hampshire. Good to see a pair of Marsh Harriers working the top end of Radipole Lake. I believe the Harriers first settled in the reserve four or five years ago and although I am not sure of breeding success, it would appear they are there to stay. As you would expect there was plenty of Hirundines and Swifts hawking over the water, as well as the expected Mute Swans and Coots on the surface.

Marsh Harrier 1, Radipole Lake, 20 May 2016

Marsh Harrier, Radipole Lake, 20 May 2016

Marsh Harrier 2a, Radipole Lake, 20 May 2016

Marsh Harrier, Radipole Lake, 20 May 2016

Coot 1a, Radipole Lake, 20 May 2016

Coot, Radipole Lake, 20 May 2016

Mute Swan1, Radipole Lake, 20 May 2016

Mute Swan, Radipole Lake, 20 May 2016

Lodmoor was rather quiet, I was expecting to see Common Terns on the scrape but it was rather empty. Standfast a single Sandwich Tern perched on a post. A couple of Grey Herons were the only other birds of interest.

Grey Heron 1, Lodmoor, 20 May 2016

Grey Heron, Lodmoor, 20 May 2016

Grey Heron 2, Lodmoor, 20 May 2016

Grey Heron, Lodmoor, 20 May 2016

That is Dorset finished with for this time at least. Next it is onto Mid-Wales.

Steve C

Portland Round Up; Pipits and Skylark

This entry is to basically wind up the visit to Portland a few weeks back to see the Great-spotted Cuckoo. Just to think I was panicking about the bird staying 5 days so I could see it and here we are and the bird is approaching a month in residence. No doubt fattened up after gorging on the Portland Caterpillar population.

As I said at the time most migrants had passed through by the time I visited; the only obvious bird still on the move being Barn Swallow. But as you would expect there was plenty of resident breeding birds to keep an eye out for. Rock Pipits breed around the coastal fringe and you would be very unlucky to pay a visit and not connect with the species. The confiding vocal bird below was on the West Cliffs nearby to one of the disused quarries.

Rock Pipit 4a Portland, 20 May 2016

Rock Pipit, Portland, 20 May 2016

Rock Pipit 5, Portland, 20 May 2016

Rock Pipit, Portland, 20 May 2016

Rock Pipit 6, Portland, 20 May 2016

Rock Pipit, Portland, 20 May 2016

 Skylarks were present in good numbers throughout the Bill area. The top field in particular was a constant chorus of song. The Kestrel snap was taken just along from the Skylarks, again happy to pose for me as the Raven had done for a good few minutes before carrying on hunting.

Skylark 1, Portland, 19 May 2016

Skylark, Portland, 19 May 2016

Skylark 2, Portland, 19 May 2016

Skylark, Portland, 19 May 2016

Kestrel 2, Portland, 19 May 2016

Kestrel, Portland, 19 May 2016

The Bill cliffs and the surrounding sea held good numbers of Guillemots, (possibly the most I have ever seen there), along with a supporting cast of Razorbills and Shags. However, I saw in one of the Obs blog entries that the Ravens have developed a taste for Auk eggs, so I am not sure how many eggs and subsequent chicks will survive the onslaught. Hopefully enough will to keep this outpost population rising.

Guillemots and Shags 1a, Portland, 20 May 2016

Guillemots and Shags, Portland, 20 May 2016

Fulmar 1, Portland, 19 May 2016

Fulmar, Portland, 19 May 2016

Herring Gull 2, Portland, 19 May 2016

Immature Herring Gull, Portland, 19 May 2016

Herring Gull 2a, Portland, 19 May 2016

Closer crop of above image

Steve C

Confiding Raven on Portland

Although my visit to Portland during May was primarily concerned with connecting with the Great-spotted Cuckoo, I was also hoping for a few late migrants still moving through, as well as catching up with a few of the resident breeders. As it happened late migrants were few and far between excepting Barn Swallows; which, on the Thursday were passing through in good numbers. (That said I am writing this on June 1st and they seem to be in short supply since then).

Raven 1, Portland, 20 May 2016

Raven, Portland, 20 May 2016

As expected I did come across a number of Ravens. I do remember Martin Cade saying a few years back that there was at least four pairs nesting on the west cliffs, so it is likely now that their numbers may well be into double figures. I came across them both on the West and East cliffs as well as feeding in the top fields with other Corvids. A family party consisting of 2 adults and 3 immature birds followed me along the west coast footpath, more accurately I was pushing them along just in front of me. The birds showed well as they flitted from quarry to quarry and eventually allowed a snap whilst three of them perched on an old loading derrick.

Ravens 1, Portland, 20 May 2016

Ravens, Portland, 20 May 2016

The Raven below was a particularly confiding individual, (especially for a member of the Crow family). It flew onto the post about twenty yards from where I was standing as I was carrying out a top fields loop. It allowed me to half the distance to get the close up, and stayed on the post watching me leave as I headed back on the loop. Pretty sure this is as close to the species as I have ever got.

Raven 3a, Portland, 20 May 2016

Raven, Portland, 20 May 2016

Raven 5a, Portland, 20 May 2016

Raven, Portland, 20 May 2016

Raven 4, Portland, 20 May 2016

Raven close up, Portland, 20 May 2016

Steve C

Common Cuckoo at Cotswold Water Park; not forgetting a feisty Robin

During the two visits to the Cotswold Water Park last week, I heard several Common Cuckoos, Cuculus canorus, around the reserve, coupled with a few sightings of birds mainly in flight. As most people will know the song is far carrying, so it is difficult to accurately estimate the numbers of males around the area. Maybe half a dozen will be near the mark. That said the Cleveland Lakes reserve only covers a fraction of the total park area so the actual figure for the Water Park as a whole will inevitably be higher.

Cuckoo 3, Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

Common Cuckoo, Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

As we watched the roosting Red-footed Falcon at Pit 72, one particular male Cuckoo was vigorously patrolling his territory. Singing both in flight and at various perches. He alighted in one particular tree several times over the period of around an hour and each time the resident Robin would fly into action to evict him. Even as the Cuckoo flew away the Robin would pursue, giving alarm calls and scolding the much larger bird as he went on his way.

Cuckoo 4a, Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

Common Cuckoo with Robin in Pursuit, Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

Cuckoo and Robin, Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

I’m the king of the birds, I’m the king of the birds. (My wife knows the story).

Whilst the images are not quite as sharp as I’d like, they are probably the best I have ever taken of Common Cuckoo and as always it is good to connect with what is now, a not so common species. The bottom image is a Buttercup Field just off the Thames Footpath. It just shows that even a field full of “weeds” can look stunning. Great to meet up with Dave and Moth over the two visits. Hopefully our paths will cross again.

Cuckoo 6b, Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

Common Cuckoo, Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

Cuckoo 1a Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

Common Cuckoo, Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

Cuckoo 5a, Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

Common Cuckoo, Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

Buttercup Field, Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

Buttercup Field, Cotswold Water Park, 26 May 2016

Steve C

Clutch of Peregrine pulli ringed in the New Forest

Over the festive period Keith B, organizer of the New Forest Winter Bird Survey (NFWBS) in recent years, invited the volunteers to his home for drinks.  Unfortunately, my youngest was the wrong side of her driving test, and I had to transport her to and from her work at a local hospital that particular evening and had to decline the kind offer.  However, I was able to accept Keith’s next generous offer to witness the ringing of a brood of Peregrine Falcons in the New Forest along with other survey volunteers.

The ringing took place on Friday 20 May 16 at a site that had been used by Peregrines for many years.  However, it has only been since gravel had been placed onto the base of the nest box that eggs have actually hatched, due to them previously rolling around preventing effective incubation.  This year there were two well grown chicks present and the female chick was significantly larger than the male.  The biometrics of each young bird was taken before each bird was ringed with a numbered colour ring, in addition to the standard metal BTO ring, by a trainee ringer under the supervision of Nigel J.  The whole operation was completed within ten minutes and, although it was over all too quickly, it was a real privilege to get an opportunity to get ‘up close and personal’ with an iconic species of the bird world.  The high ISO image below has now been transferred to the family e-photo frame as a reminder of a memorable experience.

Occupied Peregrine nest box

Peregrine pulli (male), New Forest – 20 May 16

I’ll certainly be double checking to see if a colour ring is visible on any future Peregrine I encounter.

Good birding,

Tony T   BSc (Hons) GeoSci (Open)

Puss Moth and Cream-bordered Green Pea at Titchfield Haven

The highlight for me from the Fareham Mothing Group outing to Titchfield Haven on Friday was a single Puss Moth.  It was encountered next to Richard D’s sheet late on in the evening after it crashed into the adjacent path side vegetation, and was located clung to an upright reed stem.  It is a large (forewing 29-38mm) white moth with intricate black markings and represented a new species for me.  An extremely fresh Gold Spot and two Cream-bordered Green Peas (Nationally Scarce B) at my sheet were two other highlights making the late night well worthwhile.  The image of a previous Gold Spot below doesn’t do justice to the iridescence of the gold markings.

Puss Moth, Titchfield Haven – 27 May 16

Gold Spot, Titchfield Haven – 10 Jul 15

Cream-bordered Green Pea, Titchfield Haven – 17 Aug 12

Recent high lights from my Fareham garden have included Pebble Prominent and Figure of Eighty.

Pebble Prominent, Fareham Garden – 6 May 16

Figure of Eighty, Fareham Garden – 16 May 16

Good mothing,

Tony T   BSc (Hons) GeoSci (Open)