Lunar Marbled Brown macro moth new for Fareham garden

A single Lunar Marbled Brown was the sixth new species of macro moth for my Fareham garden since I upgraded to a Robinson’s Trap.  However, there have been a few common species (Shuttle-shaped Dart, Bright-line Brown-eyes, Muslin Moth and Knot Grass) I have recorded in April that have yet to turn up this year.

Lunar Marbled Brown, Fareham garden – 25 Apr 16

Good mothing,

Tony T   BSc (Hons) GeoSci (Open)

Little and Great-crested Grebes at Mere Sands Wood

Spent a few days up north over the last week. Whilst visiting the mother-in-law in Burscough, I found a few hours on Friday morning to visit Mere Sands Wood Nature Reserve. I have visited this reserve on and off for the last twenty five years or so. In that time it has had its ups and downs but glad to report that the reserve is on the up at the moment. A great deal of work has gone into clearing the abundant and extremely invasive Rhododendron scrub. Hopefully this is starting to pay off as there was a great many newly arrived Blackcaps, Chiffchaffs and Willow Warblers around the reserve; all in good voice. Not to mention good numbers of the resident Song Thrush, Robins, Wrens and the usual Tits. It is also a great place to get close views of Great-crested and Little Grebes, especially from the Cyril Gibbons hide which overlooks Mere End Lake. All in all a great place to visit if you find yourself in West Lancashire.

Great-crested Grebe 1, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Great-crested Grebe, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Great-crested Grebe 3a, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Great-crested Grebe, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Great-crested Grebe 4, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Great-crested Grebe, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Great-crested Grebe 5, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Great-crested Grebe, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Great-crested Grebe 6a, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Great-crested Grebe, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

 

Little Grebe 2a, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Little Grebe, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Little Grebe 1a, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Little Grebe, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Little Grebe 4, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Little Grebe, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Little Grebe 5, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Little Grebe, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Little Grebe 5b, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Little Grebe, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

The bird above was feeding close to the hide and if it not for a Canada Goose spoiling the fun, I could have watched for hours.

Song Thrush 1, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Song Thrush, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Robin 1, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Robin, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Robin 1a, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Robin, Mere Sands Wood, 22 Apr 2016

Steve C

 

Acleris umbrana micro moth (Na) new for Fareham garden

The two species of macro moth (Frosted Green and Streamer) that were New For Garden on Friday 15 Apr 16 were completely eclipsed by confirmation of the identity of a micro moth I caught the following night.  I had my suspicions that the micro was the Nationally Scarce A Acleris umbrana due to the prominent black streak from the base to the apex of the forewing.  However, with so few records in Hampshire I assumed it had to be a form of the common and highly variable Acleris hastiana.  Due to my niggling doubts I showed the specimen to Richard D who examined its genitalia and confirmed that it was indeed Acleris umbrana (female).  The Fareham Mothing Group first encountered the species last year with one at Horsea Island and two at Titchfield Haven, all three being recorded during the month of July.  Due to the fact the species overwinters as an adult, my garden record must either represent a recent arrival from the continent or possibly an individual that has survived the mild winter locally.

I had hoped to get a few record images of the Acleris umbrana before showing it to Richard but unfortunately it refused to settle.  Consequently, I didn’t risk letting it out of the tube.  However, I’ll post an image of it mounted in due course.  The photograph below is of the specimen that turned up at my sheet at Titchfield Haven last year during an outing to the reserve by the Fareham Mothing Group.

Acleris umbrana, Titchfield Haven – 10 Jul 15

Good mothing,

Tony T   BSc (Hons) GeoSci (Open)

Green-winged Orchid at Clayhall Cemetery

Yesterday I headed to Gosport to ‘twitch’ the Green-winged Orchids in flower at the Naval Cemetery in Gosport.  The orchids, that have unspotted leaves, are only located within a small area of managed lawn beside the chapel.  The majority of the twenty or so plants were in small clumps well away from any path but the two photographed below were an exception, and allowed a few record photographs without any fear of unknowingly treading on any emerging orchids.

Green-winged Orchid, Clayhall Cemetery, Gosport-23 Apr 16

Green-winged Orchid, Clayhall Cemetery, Gosport-23 Apr 16

Good wildlife watching,

Tony T   BSc (Hons) GeoSci (Open)

Frosted Green and Streamer macro moths new for Fareham garden

I had a very rewarding couple of nights mothing in my back garden last weekend with a further two species that were new for garden (NFG).  I first encountered Frosted Green during an outing with the Fareham Mothing Group at the start of the month but the Streamer was a completely new species for me.  The Streamer, named for the black pennant like marking two thirds of the way down the leading edge, was in particularly good condition and showed the violet tint.  Both NFGs occurred on the Friday night when I only had one other moth – Hebrew Character.

Frosted Green, Fareham Garden – 15 Apr 16

Streamer, Fareham Garden – 15 Apr 16

The following night I only had two moths but the Angle Shades was new for year.  It’s a species that partially roles its wings up when at rest.  The specimen wasn’t actually inside the trap but on the wall beneath an occupied Starling Box, and I initially mistook it for a piece of discarded nesting material.

Angle Shades, Fareham Garden – 16 Apr 16

Angle Shades, Fareham Garden – 16 Apr 16

Good mothing,

Tony T   BSc (Hons) GeoSci (Open)

Brown Booby in the Tropical Atlantic

The second of the three Booby species in the Atlantic is the Brown Booby, Sula leucogaster. As with the Masked Booby it has a pan tropical range in the three major oceans. I am not sure if I am correct but I always associate this species as occurring nearer to land than the Masked or Red-footed. That said I have seen them far out at sea but never in the numbers of the other two; as I said I could be completely wrong. For some reason I did not take as many pictures of this species as we sailed from Brazil and the subsequent passage through the tropics, so I have added a few from earlier on in Protector’s 2014/15 deployment.

Brown Booby 3a, Central Atlantic Ocean, 7 Apr 2015

Brown Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 7 Apr 2015

Brown Booby 4, Central Atlantic Ocean, 7 Apr 2015

Brown Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 7 Apr 2015

Brown Booby 1, Central Atlantic Ocean, 7 Apr 2015

Brown Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 7 Apr 2015

Brown Booby 2, Central Atlantic Ocean, 7 Apr 2015

Brown Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 7 Apr 2015

Brown Booby 1, Tortola, Caribbean Sea, 17 Jun 2014

Brown Booby, Tortola, Caribbean Sea, 17 June 2014 (Happy memories of the Pussers Rum Bar !!)

Brown Booby 2a, Caribbean Sea, 12 Jun 2014

Brown Booby, Caribbean Sea, 12 June 2014

Brown Booby 3, Panama Bay, 28 Apr 2014

Brown Booby, Panama Bay, 28 Apr 2014

Brown Booby 3, Eastern Caribbean Sea, 27 Jun 2014

Brown Booby, Eastern Caribbean Sea, 27 June 2014

Steve C

Masked Boobies feeding in the Tropical Atlantic

As I mentioned before, the Masked Booby most often flies alongside the ship, but will also ride along level with the bow, but never as much as the Brown Booby. They will watch proceedings from above. As Flying Fish leave the water they generally follow from a height, sometimes hovering momentarily. When the fish re-enters the water it is swiftly followed by the bird. The Masked Booby plunge dives, tucking in the wings just before entry.  Again the images below speak for themselves.  We saw many Masked Boobies come back to the surface with fish. They do appear to have a good dive to catch ratio.

Masked Booby 8, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015_edited-1

Masked Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015

Flying Fish 3, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

The object of the birds desire. Flying Fish, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby 4, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby 44, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby 444a, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby 4444, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby 4444 splash, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

My best attempt to have a bird meeting water was still a fraction late !

Masked Booby 444444, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby with Flying Fish, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby 44444, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby with Flying Fish, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby 9, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015

Masked Booby Exiting, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby 5, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Masked Booby Exiting, Central Atlantic Ocean, 8 Apr 2015

Steve C

 

Masked Booby in the Tropical Atlantic

On our passage north from Rio to Plymouth we encountered the expected three species of Booby that frequent the Atlantic. Masked Booby is a pan-tropical fairly common species which I have seen in all three major oceans. As I mentioned before, they habitually tag along with the ship as an aid to feeding, (more on that later).

Masked Booby 6a, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015_edited-1

Masked Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015

Masked Booby 7, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015

Masked Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015

When the ship is sailing through the tropics it can be rather quiet unless you’re in the middle of a migration period. One bird that always makes an appearance is the Masked Booby.  As they do fly close to the ship, it gives you a chance to get some close up shots. An aspect of photography I always enjoy.

Masked Booby 5a, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015

Masked Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015

Masked Booby 1a, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015

Masked Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015

Masked Booby 2, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015

Masked Booby, Central Atlantic Ocean, 5 Apr 2015

Steve C

Twin-spotted Quaker, Oak Beauty and Clouded Drab new for Fareham garden

I have records for the months of March and April from previous years with my 40W Actinic Heath Trap when I was able to set it up overnight during leave periods.  However, with my new replacement Robinson’s Moth Trap I have already had three species of macro moth (Twin-spotted Quaker, Oak Beauty and Clouded Drab) that have been New For Garden, although I had encountered the species during my Friday outings with the Fareham Mothing Group.  Hopefully I can look forward to many more NFGs as the year progresses and further opportunities to get to grips with the Nikon 105mm Macro lens I bought last year.

Twin-spotted Quaker, Fareham Garden – 21 Mar 16

Oak Beauty (male), Fareham Garden – 22 Mar 16

Clouded Drab, Fareham Garden – 31 Mar 16

Other species that have been New For Year have included Early Grey, Brindled Pug, Brimstone and Herald.  Previous record images below.

Brindled Pug

Brimstone

Herald

Good mothing,

Tony T   BSc (Hons) GeoSci (Open)

Slaty-breasted Wood Rail and Green-headed Tanager at Rio de Janeiro Botanic Gardens

Before I get back to the seabirds; Tony and I flew back to Rio de Janeiro to join the ship in late March after a month of leave. We were both busy, but did manage a few hours at the Rio de Janeiro Botanic Gardens one late afternoon. We managed over 20 species before we lost the light. I was very happy with the number of birds including 11 species that were new for me including the four in the images below. The Botanic Gardens are well worth a visit, if you have a few hours to spare and appeared quite safe to us, with plenty of people around and park security guards.

Channel-billed Toucan 4, Rio Botanic Garden, 31 Mar 2015

Channel-billed Toucan, Rio Botanic Garden, 31 Mar 2015

Green-headed Tanager 3, Rio Botanic Garden, 31 Mar 2015

Green-headed Tanager, Rio Botanic Garden, 31 Mar 2015

Masked Water Tyrant 1, Rio Botanic Garden, 31 Mar 2015

Masked Water Tyrant, Rio Botanic Garden, 31 Mar 2015

Slaty-breasted Wood Rail 3, Rio Botanic Garden, 31 Mar 2015

Slaty-breasted Wood Rail, Rio Botanic Garden, 31 Mar 2015

We sailed from Niteroi late in the afternoon on the 3rd April and headed out of Guanabara Bay into the Atlantic Ocean. On the way out we had numerous Magnificent Frigatebirds, some were even welcoming visitors arriving by plane!

Magnificent Frigatebird 1a, Rio de Janeiro, 3 Apr 2015

Magnificent Frigatebird, Rio de Janeiro, 3 Apr 2015

Magnificent Frigatebird 2, Rio de Janeiro, 3 Apr 2015

Magnificent Frigatebird, Rio de Janeiro, 3 Apr 2015

Plane

Magnificent Frigatebirds meeting the 16:20 from Santiago, 3 April 2015

We also had several flocks of Brown Boobies, more of those later. We lost the daylight all too quickly but not before we had passed the statue of Christ the Redeemer, nicely backlit by the setting sun.

Brown Booby's 1, Rio de Janeiro, 3 Apr 2015

Brown Boobies, Rio de Janeiro, 3 Apr 2015

Christ the Redeemer 2

Christ the Redeemer with possible Vulture species, 3 April 2015

Steve C

Masked and Red-footed Boobies in the Atlantic Ocean

Over the next week or so I intend to post some entries that I had pretty much forgotten about, until I was looking through some of my protector images last weekend. They were taken on the passage from Rio de Janeiro back to Plymouth this time last year just before I left the ship. They are mainly concerned with the Booby family with a few extras thrown in. But before that I am just going to jump back even further in time to 2011. I was then serving on HMS York heading south through the tropics for the Falkland islands. We were pretty much on the equator give or take a few miles. Anyway I‘ll repost that entry then will follow up with some more images from 2014 where I managed to capture a Red-footed Booby with a Flying Fish. Hopefully you will see an improvement in my shots over the five years, (or NOT).

Masked and Red-footed Booby: Feeding Techniques (originally published in 2011)

“I mentioned earlier that I would try and put together an entry of the differing feeding techniques of Red-footed and Masked Boobies to catch Flying Fish.

The images below are pretty self-explanatory.  Like I said the Red-foots tended to swoop down and chase their prey hoping to catch it in mid-air.  The Masked Boobies have the more familiar approach of plunge diving, much like our own Northern Gannet.  Both colour phases of Red-footed Booby can be seen swooping down to get behind the flying fish they are after.  The latter two images show the brown phase bird on two different hunts.  Both proved to be unsuccessful although I did see the odd fish taken in mid-air.  The latter image shows a flying fish just getting back into the water with little time to spare.

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Red-footed Booby, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, 18 March 2011

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Red-footed Booby, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, 18 March 2011

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Red-footed Booby, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, 18 March 2011

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Red-footed Booby, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, 18 March 2011

The Masked Booby flies alongside the ship and hovers momentarily.  If a fish is spotted, the bird plunge dives, tucking in the wings just before entry.  Again the images speak for themselves.  I saw many Masked Boobies come back to the surface with fish.  As one image shows; some of the fish are quite a size and must be a substantial meal.  I will attempt to capture some more images of the Boobies in the act of fishing particularly the Red-footed as they close in for an aerial catch”.

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Masked Booby, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, 18 March 2011

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Masked Booby, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, 18 March 2011

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Masked Booby, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, 18 March 2011

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Masked Booby, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, 18 March 2011

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Masked Booby, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, 18 March 2011

Steve C

 

Birding Wales – Garden Moths

When I moved to Wales I treated myself to a new Robinson Trap with the initial intention of finding out what moths would visit my new garden. I put the trap out three times and caught zero moths. It was still early in the season so I wasn’t panicking yet.
The next clear night and I placed the trap in the garden and the light wouldn’t come on, so no moths and I was already on my second MV lamp. A few days later and I had three moths. A Twin-spotted Quaker, a Common Quaker and a Hebrew Character.
Since then I have had varying success but most of the moths have been new for me.
A nice looking moth at this time of year is the Oak Beauty.

Oak Beauty Bont 030416 017

Oak Beauty, Pontrhydfendigaid, 3rd April 2016

So far I have caught 76 moths of seven species and one micro moth.
Todays fare included my first Early Grey and these two Clouded Drabs

Clouded Drab Bont 120416 026

Clouded Drab, Pontrhydfendigaid, 12th April 2016

 

Clouded Drab Moth 2 120416 009

Clouded Drab, Pontrhydfendigaid, 12th April 2016

As you can see even within the same species they can be hugely variable.
Mark C.

Birding Wales – Willow Tit

When checking out our new house on Zoopla, I did what most birders would do and looked to see what reserves were the nearest. This turned out to be Cors Caron or Tregaron Bog as it is known. I first visited this area in June 1995 with my dad and brother, we came here specifically to see Red kite, as none of us had ever seen one in the wild. Now 21 years later they are a common sight, here and in many other counties in Britain, little did I know that one day I would live on the doorstep of the reserve.
Talking to the locals I was told that Willow Tit can be seen here and although the bog is massive I was pointed towards some good areas. So this morning after refreshing my memory of the Tit’s song I set off for the bog.
I didn’t hear Willow Tit and I never managed to get to my target area but I did get good views and some average images of a Tit as I strolled along the main broadwalk as one flew across in front of me.

Willow Tit Cors Caron 100416 149

Willow Tit, Cors Caron, 10th April 2016

This was only the second time I had seen this declining species, so I was chuffed to see one up close. The bog never has a great diversity of bird species but a hundred plus Sand Martin feeding over Maes Llyn was also great to see.
Mark C

 

159 Black-tailed Godwits and Yellow-legged Gull from the Titchfield Canal Path

Spent a few hours down the canal path this afternoon. The weather was mixed but that kept the path a bit quieter than of late. Am I being too miserable when I say I look forward to the path getting flooded again!

14271

The good old days

The highlights today were a good sized flock of 159 Black-tailed Godwits, 45 Mediterranean Gulls, 2 Marsh Harriers 3 Common Buzzards and hopefully a Yellow-legged Gull. 51 species in total. No sign of the Short-eared Owl that Dave Wallace connected with yesterday but he did send me an image he took of the bird which you can see below. The possible Yellow-legged Gull was sat next to a lesser Black-backed Gull on the fence line adjacent to Posbrook Floods. The difference in the back colouring is quite obvious and the legs were yellow, although they appeared paler than those of the Lesser. The birds were approx 100 metres away so not the sharpest images but I am reasonably happy with the id but not 100%

Yellow-legged Gull 2 (poss), Posbrook Floods, 9 Apr 2016

Possible Yellow-legged Gull (right hand bird), Posbrook Floods, 9 Apr 2016

Yellow-legged Gull 1 (poss), Posbrook Floods, 9 Apr 2016

Possible Yellow-legged Gull (left hand bird), Posbrook Floods, 9 Apr 2016

Marsh Harrier 1, Titchfield Haven, 9 Apr 2016

Marsh Harrier, Titchfield Haven, 9 Apr 2016

Long-tailed Tit 1, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Long-tailed Tit, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

SHORT EARED OWL (3)

Short-eared Owl, Titchfield Haven, 8 April 2016. Photo Dave Wallace

The Black-tailed Godwits were easier to id and were feeding furiously as I watched. They flushed the once along with the Med Gulls when a Buzzard came over a little too close. However, they soon settled back down. It was only when I looked on Going Birding when I got home that Dan Houghton had also counted 159 birds which I thought was rather handy.

Black-tailed Godwits 4, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Black-tailed Godwits, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Black-tailed Godwits 5, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Black-tailed Godwits, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Black-tailed Godwits 3a, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Black-tailed Godwits, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Black-tailed Godwits 3, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Black-tailed Godwits, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Black-tailed Godwits 2, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Black-tailed Godwits, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Black-tailed Godwits 1, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Black-tailed Godwits, Titchfield Canal, 9 Apr 2016

Good to bump into Tinders and his good lady near Hammond’s Bridge. If your reading Tony; Cotswold Outdoor do a nice line in lady’s walking jackets. Any colour but pink !!

Steve C

Wildlife selection at Hong Kong Wetland Park

As you would imagine there was a lot more to the Hong Kong Wetland Park than just the Spoonbills.  A good number of waders were seen from the Mudflat Hide, including my first Spotted Redshanks of the visit as well as Avocets, Black-winged Stilts, Common Redshanks, Greenshanks and Marsh Sandpipers. As at nearby Mai Po, there was a good number of Great Cormorants loafing around the reserve.

Wader Selection1, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Wader Selection, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Great Cormorants 1, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Great Cormorants, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Hong Kong Wetland park 1

Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Many were in breeding plumage and would soon be on their way north. A single Stejneger’s Stonechat was seen flycatching in one of the reed beds and several Plain Prinias could be heard singing but unfortunately no worthwhile shots were to be had. Several Pied Kingfishers and a single White-breasted were also new birds for the visit. Little and Great Egrets were more expected as was the Mudskippers which I had seen in abundance in Deep Bay.

Stejneger's Stonechat 2, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Stejneger’s Stonechat, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Little Egret 1, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Little Egret, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Great Egret 1, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Great Egret, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Mudskippers 1a, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Mudskippers, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Mudskipper 4, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Mudskipper, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Mudskipper 2, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Mudskippers, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

The only birds of prey were Common Kestrel and Eastern Buzzard. Like I said in the first post on the park, it is certainly worth a visit. It has only been ten years since it opened but I can see the species tally ticking up nicely in years to come.

Eastern Buzzard 1, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Eastern Buzzard, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

White-breasted Waterhen 1a , Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

White-breasted Waterhen , Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Red-whiskered Bulbul 1, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Red-whiskered Bulbul, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Water Lily 2 , Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Water Lily , Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Hong Kong Wetland park 2

Hong Kong Wetland Park

Russet Percher 1, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016

Russet Percher, Hong Kong Wetland Park, 6 March 2016. Photographed from the boardwalk above.

Tower Block 1

Tower Block Close Up

Steve C