Archive for American Bird Conservancy

Westside Project Threatens Over 100 Northern Spotted Owls in California

Fourteen timber sales in the Klamath National Forest approved by the USDA Forest Service late last month have received permission from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to take* up to 103 Northern Spotted Owls, a subspecies already in steep decline. The Westside project, approved on Feb. 29, proposes extensive post-fire salvage logging, 70 percent of which is in forest reserves designated by the Northwest Forest Plan as areas for wildlife conservation and forest restoration. Continue reading

Agency Targets Open Pipes and Mining Claim Markers to Reduce Bird Deaths

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today took action to reduce a serious threat to birds, issuing a memorandum to its field offices across the nation with guidance on how to eliminate the threat of open pipes on public lands. Continue reading

Expansion of Brazilian “Songbird Forest” Reserve Protects Some of the World’s Rarest Birds

The Brazilian conservation group Fundação Biodiversitas, with support from American Bird Conservancy, has secured a tract of vital Atlantic Forest habitat for the Stresemann’s Bristlefront, listed as Critically Endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and other rare species like the Banded Cotinga (shown). Continue reading

Northern Spotted Owl Populations in Rapid Decline, New Study Reports

The Northern Spotted Owl is in decline across its entire range, and its rate of decline is increasing—that is the conclusion of a major demographic study produced by federal scientists, published Wednesday, December 9, 2015, in the journal “The Condor.” The study examined survey results from monitoring areas across the range of the imperiled owl. Continue reading

Report Highlights 10 Rare Species with ‘No Room to Roam’

Habitat loss and conversion, dams, roads, and other developments are among the leading causes of wildlife habitat fragmentation, according to a new report by the Endangered Species Coalition. Continue reading

Endangered Hawaiian Petrels Moved to Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge

A historic project more than 30 years in the making took place on Kauaʻi’s north shore on Monday when 10 downy, endangered Hawaiian Petrel chicks were flown by helicopter from their montane nesting area to a new colony protected by a predator-proof fence at Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge. Continue reading

New York Governor Vetoes Feral Cat Bill, Protects Wildlife

This week, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo vetoed legislation that would have used public funds to support statewide Trap, Neuter, Release (TNR) programs for feral cats. The decision came on Monday, Oct. 26, after a lengthy public debate. Continue reading

Statement: Sage Grouse Management Plans and ‘Not Warranted’ Finding for ESA Protection

Federal management plans unveiled today are crucial for the conservation of the Greater Sage-Grouse. They protect sagebrush habitat from industrial development and wildfires, and adopt new management standards that advance conservation and habitat restoration across over 50 million acres of the species’ range on public lands. Continue reading

Interactive Website Offers New Tool to Reduce Seabird Bycatch

Hundreds of thousands of birds are accidentally injured or killed every year in fisheries around the world. A dynamic new website (www.fisheryandseabird.info) – created by American Bird Conservancy and The Pennsylvania State University’s Center for Environmental Informatics  – puts a wealth of information helpful in reducing this “bycatch” right at the fingertips of those who need it most: fishermen, conservationists, and those promoting fishery sustainability. Continue reading

Into the Sunset of the American West? Sage Grouse’s Future Hinges on Politics & Federal Management Plans

By the end of this month federal authorities will make historic decisions that may dramatically change the landscape of the American West: whether to list the Greater Sage-Grouse under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) or to rely on management plans that are currently too weak to save the iconic bird. Continue reading