Archive for BirdLife International

The future of Caño Tiburones hangs on a thread

The wind in your hair, the sound of birds, you’re paddling down 30km of estuarine channels in Puerto Rico’s largest wetland. A unique mix of freshwater and saltwater producing a full variety of natural aromas from native plants. Trying to spot all 190 resident bird species, lost in the moment, you might not realise that this small paradise is under attack. Farmers want to reclaim some of the land and a water-thirsty incinerator might be built here. Suddenly, you start to notice a slight smell of pollution, which also threatens the wetland. Continue reading

Say ‘no’ to extinction: saving Bristly and his fourteen companions

Stresemann’s Bristlefront Merulaxis stresemanni: a long-tailed bird with distinctive forehead bristles, a rufous rump, a musical whistle song, seen perhaps eating frogs and insects, and with a tennis-ball-sized tunnel for its nest. Spotted a handful of times since its rediscovery in Brazil’s Atlantic forest in 1995, that’s about all we know of this unique bird. Apart from one scary fact: there are fewer than fifteen individual birds left of the entire species. Continue reading

Climate Change Agreement rooted by historic signing on Earth Day

Think of trees and you may think of fresh air to breathe. You may think of trapping carbon and combating climate change, or of food, a livelihood, or of forest habitat for the wildlife you love. You may think of the inspiration you found whilst climbing in nature as a child, or you might think of a robust trunk and long-lived roots that extend beyond our own lives. However you think of trees, they are a great symbol for Earth Day this year, which marks a special ceremony. Continue reading

Veterinary drug could cause major drop in vulture numbers in Spain, new study confirms

According to a new study, published in the Journal of Applied Ecology on Monday and analysing the potential effects of the use of veterinary diclofenac in Spain, the approval in that country of the use of these two new veterinary drugs containing diclofenac – Diclovet and Dolofenac – could jeopardise the viability of Europe’s most important breeding population of Griffon Vultures. Continue reading

Finding Beck’s Petrel: an eight day voyage of discovery

A small, dark seabird with a white underbelly faces almost certain extinction unless its nesting grounds are found. It is with this sense of obligation that an intrepid BirdLife International team sets off on an eight day voyage of discovery this weekend. Continue reading

BirdLife advocates to halt construction of superhighway through IBA in Nigeria

The Cross River National Park, one of the most biological diverse sites in Nigeria and an Important Bird and Biodiversity Area (IBA) is currently being threatened by the construction of a Super-Highway. Continue reading

Forest loss this century is driving many species towards extinction, warns new study

Deforestation since the turn of the century has driven at least 500 species of mammals, birds and amphibians closer to extinction, according to a newly published scientific study. Continue reading

Preserving the Batumi bottleneck

Every autumn, millions of birds of prey make their way south from the Russian forests and plains to their warmer African wintering grounds. This migration takes them through high Caucasus, and along the shores of the Black and Caspian Seas, which are difficult to cross. Nowhere is this migration more impressive than in Batumi, Georgia – a 10-km wide corridor between the Black Sea and the Lesser Caucasus mountains – where over a million birds of prey (raptors) are recorded annually. Continue reading

How do you save a species that is almost impossible to track?

Until a decade ago the Balkan Lynx (a subspecies of the Eurasian Lynx) was virtually unknown to the local population and its sightings were almost mythical. This is not surprising: the subspecies’ current population is estimated at 19 to 36 adult individuals. Continue reading

New Sociable Lapwing habitats discovered in Uzbekistan

The Critically Endangered Sociable Lapwing is one of the world’s rarest and most threatened birds. It breeds in Kazakhstan and southern Russia and winters from Sudan to Pakistan and India. How it gets from its breeding grounds to its wintering areas is of great interest to conservationists, since hunting pressures along its migration routes is considered one of the main threats to the species’ population. Continue reading