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The Big Mammal Year

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  • The Big Mammal Year

    Hi Everyone,

    I'm not sure where to post this, but I thought a number of the readers would be interested in our little adventure...

    www.thebigmammalyear.com
    Last edited by richlindie; January 14th, 2010, 06:19 PM.

  • #2
    Spam?

    Not going to risk opening the link to find out!

    Comment


    • #3
      If that's the kind of response I'm likely to encounter, then this might be harder than I thought (lol). I am perplexed at how you could have even thought this is spam. Nonetheless, I have fallen for the same kind of thing before so I understand your caution - I only hope you haven't put others off from gong to the link. Perhaps someone less skeptical could click the link to prove to Michael it's not spam?

      Comment


      • #4
        Even using an Apple Mac, I will not take the risk.

        Your first post, and the text which goes with the link is unintelligible.

        Colin

        Comment


        • #5
          Wow! I am shocked at how skeptical everyone has become these days. Perhaps if you visit birdforum.net and trust some of the users there, you will see that others have visited the site and can confirm this is not spam. I'm sure that in time, my disbelievers will be silenced.

          Best Wishes
          Rich

          Oh, and congrats on the Apple Mac! I think?

          Comment


          • #6
            This is text copied directly from the page the link takes you too, hope the op, rich doesnt mind, but this is not spam. All the best

            Imagine trekking through remote Himalayan mountains in search of the near-mythical Snow Leopard. Or searching for one of the less than forty surviving Gilbert's Potoroo in Western Australia. Or what about tracking down the rare Nilgiri Marten and Lion-tailed Macaque in the jungles of India, before spotting a Blue whale in the oceans around Sri Lanka. Or perhaps pushing through the dense forests of China's Sichuan Province to catch a glimpse of the most cuddly of all beasts, the Panda. Imagine doing all this – and more - in just one year!

            Well, we hope to do just that! Welcome to The Big Mammal Year! Please join us on our journey to help conserve our world's mammals. Any support, no matter how small, is greatly appreciated! Please keep reading to see how you can be a part of this exciting project. Thank you!

            Rich and Hayley



            Many of us are familiar with the world's larger and more charismatic mammals. You certainly know what a Polar Bear is and you've no doubt heard of a Panda. You might even know that they are both endangered species. But have you heard of a Silky Sifaka or a Gilbert's Potoroo? What about a Black-crested Gibbon or an Ader's Duiker? Out of a total of 5500+ species of mammals, more than 1100 are classified as endangered - many of which remain unheard of by most of us - making the Panda and Polar Bear part of a much larger group of mammals in need of urgent support and attention.

            We have dedicated a whole year of our lives to travel around the world to see and photograph some of the rarest and most exciting mammals, and to meet with the individuals and organizations striving to protect them. Along the way, we hope to achieve two main goals:

            * To raise awareness and funds for the protection of endangered mammals.

            The trip provides an exciting platform to educate others about the world's lesser-known, endangered mammals. It also provides a medium through which donations may be collected and channeled into worthy mammal conservation initiatives - particularly those protecting rare and poorly known species. All of this will be made possible by the promotion of our trip through the media and this website, where we will provide exciting, up-to-date information on our progress throughout our journey. Ultimately, we also hope to release a photographic book of our journey - part of the proceeds of which, will go directly to mammal conservation.

            * To promote wildlife tourism around the world, with a focus on endangered mammals.

            Many people are unaware that the wonders of wildlife watching are accessible to them, wherever they are in the world. By allowing others to share in our experiences and by providing information on where to go and what to see, we hope that others can enjoy the wonders of wildlife watching, while contributing directly to conservation through the money they spend. It has been well documented that rare species stand a greater chance of protection if tourism places a value upon them. Classic examples of this include Panda tracking in the Qinling Mountains of China, and Gorilla tracking in East Africa.
            Last edited by michael23; January 14th, 2010, 07:55 PM.
            sigpic

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Colin Key View Post
              Even using an Apple Mac, I will not take the risk.

              Your first post, and the text which goes with the link is unintelligible.

              Colin
              ???? Odd response

              Sounds great Rich.....!!
              www.adambowleyart.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by birdboybowley View Post
                ???? Odd response

                Sounds great Rich.....!!
                Why odd? Using a Mac means that I am more or less immune to "web.....", but the text accompanying this first post was, to say the least, unusual.

                Like Micheal, I suspected SPAM here.

                Colin

                Comment


                • #9
                  Part of the problem is that this (and other similar forums) are plagued by first-time posters who put in a sentence of text followed by an external link to some site or other selling junk. When it's happened 30 or 40 times, it gets so that one just assumes a first-time posting with an ext link is spam. Sadly, it means one misses the occasional real person with something good to say, as here.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Totally agree with Michael. I notice that the OP has now edited the text (much more coherent) accompanying the link - he did himself no favours with the original garbage he wrote which sounded as though it came from a Nigerian who owned a Collins Pocket Dictionary .

                    Colin

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Colin Key View Post
                      Totally agree with Michael. I notice that the OP has now edited the text (much more coherent) accompanying the link - he did himself no favours with the original garbage he wrote which sounded as though it came from a Nigerian who owned a Collins Pocket Dictionary .

                      Colin
                      LOLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL

                      When I first opened this link,,I thought they were chasing Yeti's...thats pretty big.

                      I read on and it must have been a great trip for them and they are rightly proud of their adventure. Well done for "having a go"!

                      I think Colin is being a bit unfair,,a Nigerian would'nt call a leopard a big mammal,,,infact I'm thinking who would?.....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Um ... I think I'd call a Leopard a big mammal. Best not to offend them.
                        ________
                        silver surfer vaporizer
                        Last edited by Russ Heselden; January 20th, 2011, 01:47 AM.
                        Russ Heselden

                        www.russheselden.co.uk

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