Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Thayer's Gull in Lincs

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Thayer's Gull in Lincs

    Any better photos than this around of the putative Thayer's Gull seen in Lincs today - http://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/v2/Co...colnshire.jpg?

    Any views on its ID welcome - I may have to go and see this one.

    Brian S

  • #2
    Hi Brian,
    Graham Catley has some reasonable shots of it showing all the features, I'm sure he will upoad them to his blog shortly.

    You should go see it it's a cracker


    G

    Comment


    • #3
      http://pewit.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/...ire-first.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Shaky video now on blog

        http://yorkslister.blogspot.co.uk/20...-of-river.html

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm used to seeing these dark birds much earlier in the season (eg 5-6months ago) but then a soCal winter is probably harsher on the plumage.
          My Surfbirds Photo Albums

          Comment


          • #6
            Garry

            Graham's photos are very convincing - if this is not a Thayer's then...well, I don't know...

            Brian S

            Comment


            • #7
              Some videos are now available on Martian Garner's website - http://birdingfrontiers.com/2012/04/...-thayers-gull/

              Brian S

              Comment


              • #8
                Lee Evans said on his blog on the 9th: “Although the Lincolnshire juvenile 'looks the part', the size and structure of the bird, the size and length of the bill and the co....ness patterning of the plumage are more than worrying and perhaps suggest influence from elsewhere.”

                To me this is a classic Thayer's and is an excellent candidiate. I cannot see them getting much better than this bird.
                Last edited by Steve Webb; April 11th, 2012, 12:53 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  If I were you Mr Webb I would sign up to various identification chat groups where you can share your expertise on Thayer's Gulls and other gull species. Up until now I had been unsware of your larid qualities. Unlike yourself, I actually solicit the expertise of those that actually know what they are talking about and perhaps see up to 100 juvenile Thayer's Gulls on a daily basis. I take my guidance from these guys based in North America. How you can say that this is a classic is beyond me, particularly as Thayer's types are so incredibly variable. Very few 'Thayer's Gulls' recorded in Britain and Ireland actually look like the next and I am bewildered by their appearance and complexity. For me, the original Galway Tip bird was a Thayer's Gull. As you are an undoubted expert and saw this particular individual, please enlighten me as to what it was. Whilst you are at it, please inform me of what species the recent Dix Pit juvenile was - I look forward to seeing your assessment and identifications.

                  Your continued criticism and ridicule of me is very tiresome and an insult to those that inform me and share their extreme knowledge with me, especially the likes of CDRH, who is beyond doubt the best field observer of our time in my opinion. When you ridicule my position and reasoning behind contentious observations/identifications, you not only undermine me but also the observations of my many peers and informants. It is getting to the point that most experts now do not want their names associated with any form of identification discussions for fear of this type of ridicule - your recent publication of some discussion between me and Alex Lees just further proves what you are up to and it has no benefit for British birding or its enjoyment.

                  Because of you and your societies involvement on this forum now, I have now had no option other than to refrain from getting involved in discussions - in the same way that I was forced to depart from Birdforum. I find it very distasteful indeed. Please ensure that in driving me away from such forums, you use your expertise in helping solve the many issues that bestow this forum

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I don't make a habit of agreeing with Lee, indeed this could be a first, but concur with him that we don't need these tedious point scoring attempts which are becoming rather prevalent on here. His opinions were based (although perhaps not well enough attributed to) folk on ID-FRONTIERS in which there was an interesting discussion. Have a read of Peter Adriaens's post there. The phrase 'classic' for any large white-headed gull always seems a bit superflous, especially in the case of a taxon that is phenotypically as plastic as thayeri. 'Classic' may be taken to mean most different from other confusion (sub)species but not in fact represent the phenotypes that are most abundant in the population - a bit like our Euro-centric view of juvenile American Herring Gulls being big chocolate-coloured things, which as anyone who has been to America will have realised isn't that close to the population norm. Anyway, as nasty gulls go its not bad, nice one Tom Lowe.

                    Thanks to PA off of IDF for this link:

                    http://gull-research.org/glaucoides/...ylbell2005.pdf
                    Last edited by Alex Lees; April 12th, 2012, 12:22 AM. Reason: link
                    Dept. of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK

                    My website - Neotropical Bird Club -Tropical Forest Research - Punkbirder - Wikiaves

                    In natural science the principles of truth ought to be confirmed by observation. Carolus Linnaeus

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by LeeEvans View Post
                      Because of you and your societies involvement on this forum now, I have now had no option other than to refrain from getting involved in discussions - in the same way that I was forced to depart from Birdforum. I find it very distasteful indeed. Please ensure that in driving me away from such forums, you use your expertise in helping solve the many issues that bestow this forum
                      Lee, Only yesterday on your blog you said: “It’s identification remains tentative but it does ‘tick all of the boxes’ with what we have previously accepted as dark Thayer’s Gull.” So I do find your stance on this bird very confusing.

                      I agree that my last message on here was a bit over the top so in the interests of harmony I agree not to post any anti-LGRE messages on Surfbirds. So you are welcome to continue posting on here if you so wish. Steve
                      Last edited by Steve Webb; April 12th, 2012, 01:41 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi Lee,

                        Having absolutely no interest in rarites that turn up in the Emerald Isle can you please let us know the differences between your Galway Tip bird and the one in Lincolnshire, that's assuming that both were juveniles of course? By the way I cannot find any accepted records of Thayer's for Co Galway, there are two records each for Co Mayo & Co Donegal as well as one record each for Co Antrim & Co Cork but nothing for Co Galway.

                        All the best....
                        Last edited by Archie Archer; April 13th, 2012, 11:10 AM.
                        Archie - Association of Satirical Birders & Ornithologists

                        check out my blog at www.archiesbirding.blogspot.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Archie Archer View Post
                          Hi Lee,

                          Having absolutely no interest in rarites that turn up in the Emerald Isle can you please let me know us know the differences between your Galway Tip bird and the one in Lincolnshire, that's assuming that both were juveniles of course? By the way I cannot find any accepted records of Thayer's for Co Galway, there are two records each for Co Mayo & Co Donegal as well as one record each for Co Antrim & Co Cork but nothing for Co Galway.

                          All the best....
                          There have been a couple of recent candidates:
                          http://uk400clubrarebirdalert.blogsp...ty-galway.html
                          http://birdingfrontiers.com/2011/02/...ull-in-galway/

                          but Lee is referring to this one:

                          1989 Galway: juvenile/first-winter, Galway City Dump 11th to 31st March (Kilbane, 1989). Additional photographs in Dutch Birding 11:82 and Cottridge & Vinicombe (1986).

                          the first claimed in Europe to my knowledge.... cf: http://www.irbc.ie/announcements/announce28.php
                          Last edited by Alex Lees; April 13th, 2012, 12:59 AM.
                          Dept. of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK

                          My website - Neotropical Bird Club -Tropical Forest Research - Punkbirder - Wikiaves

                          In natural science the principles of truth ought to be confirmed by observation. Carolus Linnaeus

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            According to that article the Galway bird of 1989 is not accepted as it says "the Galway record is considered indeterminate on current knowledge" if I'm reading it right?

                            ATB

                            Steph'
                            Last edited by GoneBirding; April 12th, 2012, 08:54 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by GoneBirding View Post
                              According to that article the Galway bird of 1989 is not accepted as it says "the Galway record is considered indeterminate on current knowledge" if I'm reading it right?

                              ATB

                              Steph'
                              Yes, although Lee seems to think it was one. No idea if the IRBC have plans to reopen that file...
                              Dept. of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK

                              My website - Neotropical Bird Club -Tropical Forest Research - Punkbirder - Wikiaves

                              In natural science the principles of truth ought to be confirmed by observation. Carolus Linnaeus

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X