Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

new shearwater

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • new shearwater

    Pyle, Welch & Fleischer 2011. A new species of shearwater (Puffinus) recorded from Midway Atoll, northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Condor: in press.

    Abstract
    Small black-and-white shearwaters of the genus Puffinus are distributed globally, and their phylogenetic relationships are complex and uncertain. In 1963 a small shearwater collected at Midway Atoll in the North Pacific Ocean was identified as a Little Shearwater (P. assimilis), but several physical features suggest closer alliance with Audubon's Shearwater (P. lherminieri) and its relatives. Biometrics indicate that the taxon this specimen represents is smaller than any other known shearwater, and phylogenetic analyses indicate it is distinct, with a pair-wise sequence divergence of at least 3.8% from all related taxa. We thus propose a new species based on the specimen: Bryan's Shearwater (Puffinus bryani). The breeding and nonbreeding ranges of Bryan's Shearwater are unknown, but a physical resemblance to the North Atlantic boydi (of controversial taxonomic status within Puffinus) suggests an affiliation with subtropical or tropical waters. Bryan's Shearwater is apparently rare and could be threatened by extinction; therefore, additional information is needed to increase our understanding of this taxon and its conservation requirements.

    http://www.jstor.org/pss/10.1525/cond.2011.100117

    a bold move with only a single type, so this thing must be pretty distinctive... who wants to take bets that it shows up on one of Debbie Shearwater's pelagics next...
    Last edited by Alex Lees; August 21st, 2011, 09:41 PM.
    Dept. of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK

    My website - Neotropical Bird Club -Tropical Forest Research - Punkbirder - Wikiaves

    In natural science the principles of truth ought to be confirmed by observation. — Carolus Linnaeus

  • #2
    "...who wants to take bets that it shows up on one of Debbie Shearwater's pelagics"
    One already has Western Birds 2008 Report of California Rare Bird Committee:
    Little Shearwater Puffinus assimilis. One photographed on Monterey Bay, MTY, 29 Oct 2003 was previously accepted as the only record for California (San Miguel and McGrath 2005, 2003-149a). Steve N. G. Howell challenged this conclusion, offering as an alternative hypothesis that the bird was an aberrant Manx Shearwater (P. puffinus). he suggested that molt and lighting compounded some plumage oddities, even though other features, such as leg color, were incorrect for Manx. his analysis was comprehensive and compelling, and the decision to remove this species from the state list was unanimous. the committee is grateful to Howell for his contribution. There is still disagreement over the identification of the bird depicted in these photographs. Some committee members believe it is a Manx, although a majority believes it is more likely a Little. despite these differences, the entire committee, which includes one of the observers, agrees that a record of this significance needs to be irreproachable to be accepted. beyond the complications of interpreting features that seem to vary from one image to the next, the taxonomic status of the Little Shearwater complex is unsettled. if the bird was a Little Shearwater in the broad, traditional sense (e.g., Jouanin and Mougin 1979), its identification to subspecies or species in a narrower sense remains problematic. Several committee members (and Howell) emphasized that this sighting could involve an undescribed taxon; the last chapter on the record may yet be written.
    Last edited by W. Ruskin Butterfield; August 21st, 2011, 11:45 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by W. Ruskin Butterfield View Post
      "...who wants to take bets that it shows up on one of Debbie Shearwater's pelagics"
      One already has Western Birds 2008 Report of California Rare Bird Committee:
      Little Shearwater Puffinus assimilis. One photographed on Monterey Bay, MTY, 29 Oct 2003 was previously accepted as the only record for California (San Miguel and McGrath 2005, 2003-149a). Steve N. G. Howell challenged this conclusion, offering as an alternative hypothesis that the bird was an aberrant Manx Shearwater (P. puffinus). he suggested that molt and lighting compounded some plumage oddities, even though other features, such as leg color, were incorrect for Manx. his analysis was comprehensive and compelling, and the decision to remove this species from the state list was unanimous. the committee is grateful to Howell for his contribution. There is still disagreement over the identification of the bird depicted in these photographs. Some committee members believe it is a Manx, although a majority believes it is more likely a Little. despite these differences, the entire committee, which includes one of the observers, agrees that a record of this significance needs to be irreproachable to be accepted. beyond the complications of interpreting features that seem to vary from one image to the next, the taxonomic status of the Little Shearwater complex is unsettled. if the bird was a Little Shearwater in the broad, traditional sense (e.g., Jouanin and Mougin 1979), its identification to subspecies or species in a narrower sense remains problematic. Several committee members (and Howell) emphasized that this sighting could involve an undescribed taxon; the last chapter on the record may yet be written.
      http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/lish_pp.html
      http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/images/lish6.jpg

      note the principle observer...
      Last edited by Alex Lees; August 22nd, 2011, 01:37 PM.
      Dept. of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK

      My website - Neotropical Bird Club -Tropical Forest Research - Punkbirder - Wikiaves

      In natural science the principles of truth ought to be confirmed by observation. — Carolus Linnaeus

      Comment


      • #4
        Pyle's 2003 description mentions blue legs. Tony Pym says Bryan's has: "The legs were blue, typical of the Little Shearwater group. ‘Typical’ being the operative word though, as we know now that the colour of undertail coverts in small shearwater can vary extensively within populations, that back colour can change with moult and age, and leg colour may vary from blue to pink or pale according to individuals (at least in Audubon’s and Tropical Shearwater anyway)."
        http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=203318 .

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by W. Ruskin Butterfield View Post
          Pyle's 2003 description mentions blue legs. Tony Pym says Bryan's has: "The legs were blue, typical of the Little Shearwater group. ‘Typical’ being the operative word though, as we know now that the colour of undertail coverts in small shearwater can vary extensively within populations, that back colour can change with moult and age, and leg colour may vary from blue to pink or pale according to individuals (at least in Audubon’s and Tropical Shearwater anyway)."
          http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=203318 .
          Looking at that thread, and thanks to Richard Klim:

          http://nationalzoo.si.edu/Publicatio...shearwater.cfm
          Dept. of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK

          My website - Neotropical Bird Club -Tropical Forest Research - Punkbirder - Wikiaves

          In natural science the principles of truth ought to be confirmed by observation. — Carolus Linnaeus

          Comment


          • #6
            Looking at the Smithsonian link I assumed the color picture of a shearwater was the 1963 bird, but it is a possible P. bryani from 1991:
            http://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com...hearwater.html
            Film photos look so quaint nowadays.
            Pyle in 2003 emphasized the littleness of the shearwater and P.brani is the smallest shearwater. My question given the small population or even extinctness of bryani could the 1991 and the 2003 birds be the same?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by W. Ruskin Butterfield View Post
              Looking at the Smithsonian link I assumed the color picture of a shearwater was the 1963 bird, but it is a possible P. bryani from 1991:
              http://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com...hearwater.html
              Film photos look so quaint nowadays.
              Pyle in 2003 emphasized the littleness of the shearwater and P.brani is the smallest shearwater. My question given the small population or even extinctness of bryani could the 1991 and the 2003 birds be the same?
              No strong reason to presume extinction so long as they represent vagrants from elsewhere and not a relictual population. Lots of islands in the Pacific and plenty of comparable stories of seabird rediscoveries....
              Dept. of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK

              My website - Neotropical Bird Club -Tropical Forest Research - Punkbirder - Wikiaves

              In natural science the principles of truth ought to be confirmed by observation. — Carolus Linnaeus

              Comment


              • #8
                Brings to mind Ricky Gervais' "chubby bat"...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by mafting View Post
                  Brings to mind Ricky Gervais' "chubby bat"...
                  In case anyone missed this news:

                  39th Meeting of the Pacific Seabird Group: Turtle Bay, HI, 7-10 Feb 2012. [abstracts]

                  BRYAN’S SHEARWATERS HAVE SURVIVED IN THE BONIN ISLANDS, NORTHWESTERN PACIFIC!

                  Kazuo Horikoshi*1, Masaki Eda2, Kazuto Kawakami3, Hajime Suzuki1, Hayato Chiba1, and Takashi Hiraoka4,
                  1 Institute of Boninology, Chichijima, Ogasawara, Tokyo Japan, hori AT ogasawara.or.jp; 2 Tottori University, Yonago, Tottori Japan; 3 Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki Japan; 4 Yamashina Institute for Ornithology, Abiko, Chiba Japan

                  The Bryan’s Shearwater (Puffinus bryani) is a new species described in 2011 based on a specimen collected in Midway Atoll in 1963 (Pyle et al. 2011). This specimen and another recorded at Midway Atoll in the early 1990s are the sole reliable records to date. Bryan's Shearwaters likely do not regularly breed in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands because of the limited number of records. The Bonin Islands are subtropical oceanic islands located in the northwestern Pacific Ocean at a similar latitude to Midway. Since 1997, we have found six samples of remarkably small Puffinus shearwater (one rescued individual and five carcasses) which showed similar morphological characteristics to the Bryan’s Shearwater. In this study, we genetically and morphologically examined the Bonin samples and have confirmed that they are the Bryan’s Shearwaters. Since the latest sample was found on an islet to the north of Chichijima Island in 2011, the species have surely survived there. There is thus a strong possibility that the Bonin Islands provide their breeding grounds, although the exact locations remain unclear. Three of the examined individuals found on an islet off Chichijima Island were detected as carcasses preyed upon by Black Rats (Rattus rattus). Although attempts were made to eradicate rats on this island in 2008, there are various other rat-infested islands that could be breeding grounds for shearwaters. In any case, Bryan's Sheawater appears to be very rare and threatened in the Bonin Islands. For its conservation, detection of their breeding sites and rat eradication are essential.


                  UPDATED INFORMATION ON BRYAN'S SHEAWATERS (PUFFINUS BRYANI) IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN, WITH A LOOK TOWARD ITS CONSERVATION

                  Peter Pyle*1, Reginald David2, Bruce D. Eilerts3, Binion Amerson4, Matthew McKown5 and Abe Borker5
                  1 The Institute for Bird Populations, P.O. Box 1346, Point Reyes Station, CA 94956, USA, ppyle AT birdpop.org; 2 Rana Productions, Kailua-Kona, HI; 3 Arizona Department of Transportation, Phoenix, AZ; 4 Dallas, TX 75234; 5 Coastal Conservation Action Lab., U.C. Santa Cruz, CA.

                  A new species of Procellariiform, Bryan's Shearwater (Puffinus bryani), was described by Pyle, A. J. Welch, and R. C. Fleischer in 2011 based on a specimen collected by Amerson in February 1963 on Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. It had been misidentified as a Little Shearwater (P. assimilis) but genetically appears closer to a clade including the Newell's Shearwater (P. newelii) of the Southeastern Hawaiian Islands. During the winters of 1990-1991 and 1991-1992, a second Bryan's Shearwater was discovered calling in a rock crevice near the northeast corner of Sand Island, Midway, and photographed, videotaped, and audiotaped by David and Eilerts in December 1991. These two records likely represented prospecting individuals, and the locations of source colonies of Bryan's Shearwaters remain unknown. There have also been several reports of Little Shearwaters in the North Pacific that may or may not have represented mis-identified Bryan's Shearwaters. Here we present updated information on seasonality, breeding habitat requirements, and vocalizations of Bryan's Shearwaters based on the 1963 and 1991 records, and we review potential at-sea records in the North Pacific. Bryan's Shearwaters are undoubtedly rare and, if extant, may need targeted conservation actions to increase their population size. We present ideas on the potential breeding and foraging ranges, breeding habitat, and next conservation steps to protect this newly discovered seabird.
                  copied from Richard Klim's posting on the other channel.

                  see also:

                  http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/...na013000c.html
                  Dept. of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK

                  My website - Neotropical Bird Club -Tropical Forest Research - Punkbirder - Wikiaves

                  In natural science the principles of truth ought to be confirmed by observation. — Carolus Linnaeus

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X