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Thread: Rufous-necked Wood-Rail, New Mexico

  1. #1
    Senior Member AndyB's Avatar
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    Default Rufous-necked Wood-Rail, New Mexico


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    Moderator Brian S's Avatar
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    Hi Andy

    I saw this article yesterday, before the images came out and noted the carefully worded statement here - http://blog.aba.org/2013/07/abarare-...ew-mexico.html - 'this should be regarded as an unverified report. After that, I'm sure there will be questions of provenance." However, that was before the video was added to the link.....

    Bosque del Apache is a great reserve, i have spent many hours there, so good luck to those that go for it.

    Brian S
    Last edited by Brian S; July 8th, 2013 at 07:29 AM.

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    The Arizona Field Ornithologist website says: Normal range is barely into southern Sinaloa in Mexico. Normally a salt water species and mangrove specialist, it is rarely found outside this habitat, so the provenance of this bird could be an issue. However, the second photo clearly shows it is unbanded and appears to have normal feet.

    Arizona birders have an institutional memory of a Double-striped Thick-knee from 1987 which turned out to have been smuggled from Guatamala only to hang out on a golf course.

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    Senior Member AndyB's Avatar
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    This reserve is also where that remarkable Sungrebe was found a few years ago: http://www.surfbirds.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4349
    Not sure if that helps or hinders this particular record...

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    Moderator Brian S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ecoturs Colombia View Post
    Hi
    Just to comment on this. I have seen Rufous-necked Wood-Rail twice in northern South America. Last year I watched an individual in some dry scrub thickets on the Caribbean coast near Baranquilla, Colombia. The habitat was 1 - 2 kms inland and no mangroves or salt water were present and I know of no Mangroves nearby. The bird was behaving more like a Grey-necked Wood-Rail in that it was foraging in the forest leaf litter well away from any water sources.

    About ten years previous to this the only Rufous-necked Wood-Rail I saw in Ecuador was at Rio Palenque, which is a patch of Tropical Forest in the Pacific lowlands but nowhere near the coast. The bird walked out onto the gravel entrance track although it may have been near a fresh water stream. Again this was the kind of habitat where you would expect Grey-necked Wood-Rail.

    These two sightings would suggest to me that either

    a. Wandering Rufous-necked Wood-Rails can turn up in atypical habitat.

    or

    b. Rufous-necked Wood-Rails are not as tied to Saltwater and Mangroves as previously thought.

    I suspect the later is the case. The recently published "Field Guide to the Birds of Colombia" also states "Local in mangroves and coastal forests..."

    Considering the track history for vagrancy in this family I don't think it's choice of habitat should be seen as a negative factor.

    Trevor
    Trevor

    Thanks for this. How good are they at walking long distances.....?

    And welcome to surfbirds forums

    Brian S

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    Moderator Brian S's Avatar
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    Trevor

    My comment welcoming you was warmly meant and my comment about them walking long distances flippant, and should not be taken to heart - I might have added a smiley...

    I simply wondered how it might have got there from Mexico: as I said it is a long walk

    Brian S

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