Northern and Central Peru – 20 October – 16 November 2007

Published by David Beadle (dbeadle AT pathcom.com)

Participants: David Beadle – Toronto, Ontario - trip organizer plus others (see below)

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David Beadle – Toronto, Ontario - trip organizer
Dennis Barry – Whitby, Ontario
George Bryant – Toronto, Ontario
Margaret Carney – Whitby, Ontario
Hugh Currie – Toronto, Ontario
Bob Curry – Burlington, Ontario
Glenda Slessor – Burlington, Ontairo
Robert Stamp – Hamilton, Ontario

This extensive trip to Northern Peru was designed to visit most of the key sites in order to see as many endemic birds as possible, without going anywhere too remote. Dave developed the itinerary based on first-hand experience from previous trips to the region. Anahi Plenge of Ultimate Voyages did a great job in making sure that what had been written on paper became reality. The trip was quite successful and we ended up with a whopping 862 species throughout the month. This total included more than 50 Peruvian endemics, many of which we saw very well. In such a short space of time one can only scratch the surface of such a diverse and complex region, but we all felt that we had sampled a nice cross section of the wildlife available to us. I for one look forward to returning yet again to this fabulous part of the “bird continent”.

Notes on selected sites:

The excellent “Where to Watch Birds in Peru” by Thomas Valqui is an absolute must for the visiting birder. However, since the publication of this important book a number of sites have been further explored or only briefly mentioned in the guide, or not at all! The following notes are designed to help birders visiting the region.

Muyuna Lodge: This very comfortable lodge is south of the Amazon River, about 140 km. from Iquitos. It takes about 2-3 hours by speedboat to reach the lodge, which is situated on the banks of the Rio Yanayacu. Not too many birders have visited this lodge yet, which is a shame because it has much to offer. There is great opportunity here to bird in very nice varzea forest, either from boats or recently cut trails. It is probably THE place to see Black-tailed Antbird. It is also a good site for the very local Wattled Curassow, but on this occasion we were unlucky with this desirable cracid. Behind the lodge there is a trail system that cuts through some nice swampy and terra firme forest with a nice selection of birds and other wildlife on offer. As far as I know there is no official checklist of the birds around this lodge and I’m sure there is much to be discovered here. One of the guides, Moises, is very knowledgeable about the birds of the area and we all enjoyed his “quiet” enthusiasm. I would certainly encourage birders to visit this lodge, especially if you are seeking varzea species and enjoy boat trips!

Juan Guerra: Although this area is well known, the small quebrada we birded is perhaps not visited too often. In Valqui, go to section 6.1 and, looking at the map you will see the dirt road that runs east parallel to the Rio Mayo headed towards Shapaja. About one-two km. along the road there is an obvious pull-off on the right with a clear view across the river. Opposite this is a small trail that goes off to the left and eventually leads to a small village. After about 100 m the trail enters a small wooded quebrada. It is quite rich in dry forest Amazonian birds. It is a good place to look for the huallagae form of Northern Slaty-Antshrike as well as the local Chestnut-throated Spinetail, Flammulated Bamboo-Tyrant and Sulphur-bellied Tyrant-Manakin. Other good birds here include Ashy-headed Greenlet, Pale-breasted Thrush and Bluish-fronted Jacamar. It does not take too long to bird this small area and it is only about 18 km. South of Tarapoto.

Quebrada Mishkiyaku: This excellent forested site can be found a short distance south of Moyobamba. Drive about 10 km along the road to the “Thermal Baths” (ask the locals) and look for the gravel track on the right, opposite the “Water Treatment Works”. The trail winds upwards from about 800 metres and passes through some very nice forest on the way. The trail is good but can be a bit slippery when wet! I have been reliably informed that such birds as Grey-tailed Piha, Scarlet-banded and Fiery-throated Fruiteaters and Buff-tipped Sicklebill occur here. Unfortunately we experienced heavy rain throughout our visit resulting in fewer birds, and none of the above. However, the potential was obvious, especially when one considers that good forest at this altitude is hard to reach. Hopefully I’ll return soon…

Abra Patricia Lodge: This excellent new lodge will be a must on all trips from now on. Situated just east of the pass and surrounded by superb forest it is a great base from which to work the whole area. The view from the dining area is amazing. There are some well-maintained trails right behind the sleeping quarters that penetrate some very nice forest. I’m sure it’s only a matter of time before a Long-whiskered Owlet is found here! As it is there are several owl species around the lodge. When we stayed here the buidings were only half finished, and it was a real rush-job for the staff to have the place ready for us! However, they did a great job and we thouroughly enjoyed our stay in this very special place. Now, if only there had been some hot water! Oh yes, I should mention that this place is dynamite for moths at night – check out the walls after the dark when the lights go on…

Itinerary:

Day 1 - 20 October: This, our first day, got a bit messed up…but it worked out okay in the end – honest! After an enforced eight-hour stay at the airport due to a missed flight we finally limped into Iquitos late in the afternoon. We were met by Basilio from Explornapo Lodge, who was to be our guide for the next couple of days. We booked into the Hotel and almost immediately made for the banks of the Amazon to see what could be found at such a late hour. Dinner at the Eiffel building ended a somewhat tiring day. It could only be uphill from here! Accommodation was at Acosta Hotel.

Day 2 - 21 October: And it was. An early start and an easy transfer to the dock ensured that we were on our way to Explornapo Lodge. Arriving just before lunchtime we had just about enough leeway to swing a short boat trip to an early successional river island. After lunch we opted to explore a mature river island followed by a leisurely paddle along a lovely blackwater river. After dinner it was back into the boat for a short nightbirding excursion. No luck seeing anything but there were several owls, potoos and nightjars calling. Accommodation was at Explornapo Lodge.

Day 3 - 22 October: All day at Explornapo. A predawn start got us to the famous canopy walkway by first light. All morning was spent on the walkway. Luckily it wasn’t too busy and we were able to spend much of our time on the main platform. To be honest it was slow, but we did notch up a reasonable list of canopy species, though nothing too dramatic. It was overcast and quite cool, so this may have affected bird behaviour. After lunch we walked one of the trails that radiate from the Lodge. One can never expect too much in the afternoon but we did see a couple of nice birds, including a flighty male Black-necked Red-Cotinga and a cracking Spotted Puffbird.

Day 4 - 23 October: We had time for a couple of hours birding on one of the trails before we rather sadly had to return to the lodge for breakfast. It was quite busy with understory and canopy flocks but our time was over. Shortly thereafter we boarded the launch that was to take us safely back to Iquitos. An easy transfer to another nearby dock and we were shortly on our way to Muyuna lodge. It took a couple of hours and we got there in time to take a short exploratory boat ride with our guide Moises. After dinner it was back into the boat for a nocturnal cruise along the river. It was excellent and we had some epic views of Boat-billed Herons and several nightbirds. Accommodation was at Muyuna Lodge.

Day 5 - 24 October: All day at Muyuna. We made an early start and headed for a trail through varzea forest that Moises had recently cut. This is THE place to see Black-tailed Antbird. We saw a nice variety of varzea species and headed back for lunch. In the afternoon we walked a nice trail behind the Lodge that cuts through some productive terra firme forest. It was rather hot but we notched up a pleasing list of antbirds and tyrants.

Day 6 - 25 October: We returned early to the recently cut riverside trail taking breakfast with us. We hoped for Wattled Curassow…but it was not to be this time. It was quite birdy and we were sorry to leave. After lunch it was back into the launch and a return journey to Iquitos. Arriving at an overbooked hotel it was with some relief that we got upgraded to a much nicer sister hotel – with a swimming pool! This was very popular with certain members of the group.

Day 7 - 26 October: It was great for me to return to the Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve with our guide Juan Diaz Alvan. It was amazingly hot, even early in the morning, but the birding was excellent. We nailed one target after another, with good views too. Never mind about those we missed, we’ll get ‘em tomorrow. Hmm. Read on.

Day 8 - 27 October: We returned to Allpahuayo/Mishana this morning with the aim of “mopping up”. Well, it was even hotter than the previous day and the birds were all but non-existent! It was a real struggle and by midday we had all had enough and returned to Iquitos. We decided to hire a boat to take us to some river island for the afternoon. The first one was a bust – still too hot. But the second one provided a flurry of desirable island specialities before it became too dark to see anything. The Sand-colored Nighthawks were amazing as we approached the dock in Iquitos.

Day 9 - 28 October: An early flight to Lima and we were met by the van and driver for an excursion to Lomas de Lachay. Everything went according to plan and we saw most of what we wanted. We had trouble finding good shorebird habitat though, and didn’t have the time to go north to the more productive coastal lagoons. However, we did check the beach at the seaside town of Chancay and connected with a few shorebirds and gulls. So, back to Lima and our evening flight to Chiclayo. Ali – our trusty driver for the next couple of weeks - met us at the airport and whisked us away to our hotel. It had been a tiring day. Overnight in Chiclayo at Casa de la Luna Hotel.

Day 10 - 29 October: This morning we drove to Bosque de Pomac. After telling everyone how hot it can get here I was amazed that it was overcast and cool! This was good though and the bird activity remained high all morning. We saw all the target species and headed for the coast. After a nice seaside lunch we birded the coastal lagoons near Puerto Eten for a few list padders. Then it was up to Chaparri. After a couple of hours we picked up our guide Thomas and headed into this lovely community-run reserve. An excellent dinner followed by a little nightbirding and another busy day was over. Overnight at Chaparri Lodge.

Day 11 - 30 October: An early start around the lodge at Chaparri got us some amazing birds. We nailed all the important targets before breakfast! A leisurely hike up the quebrada gave us great looks at White-winged Guans and a host of other tumbesian endemics. After lunch we reluctantly departed and returned to Chiclayo to buy food for the next day. Overnight at Los Horcones Lodge in Tucume.

Day 12 - 31 October: We had to rise super early this morning for the long drive to Abra de Porculla. The weather was perfect and we scored heavily with all the targets bar one, couldn’t find Piura Chat-Tyrant anywhere, what a shame. Then it was onwards to a small side canyon a couple of kilometers north of Chamaya. We saw some of our targets here but the weather had worsened and in high wind and threatening rain we beat a hasty retreat to Jaen. Overnight in Jaen at El Bosque Hotel.

Day 13 – 1 November: Since the seminario road was not too far away we had what can only be described as a lay in this morning! The birding was excellent and we scored well with just about everything we wanted. Since we still needed Litle Inca-Finch we next headed to the cactus scrub of Bagua Chica. It was hard work but half the group managed to see one. We then drove to Pomacochas, where we checked out some scrub around town and looked at a largely birdless Laguna Pomacochas. Overnight in Pomacochas at El Paraiso Hotel.

Day 14 – 2 November: This was the morning many had been waiting for – the Spatuletail! We met up with Santos, the local guide, and hiked up to the small private reserve that is famous for this near-mythical hummer. We were not to be disappointed and the birds put on a great show. Other hummers were scarce though. We drove up to the beginning of the Rio Chido trail in the rain but didn’t stay long as it was virtually birdless in the largely deforested terrain here. Instead, we opted to drive to Abra Patricia and score a few of the specialties of that area. We did okay, but the rain forced us to return earlier than planned. Overnight at El Paraiso Hotel again.

Day 15 – 3 November: We spent the whole day birding this famous area. We started at Valle Hermoso, then further along the road to Campamento Garcia, and finally down to the Afluente area. We found a few of the specialities and some impressive mixed species flocks in the fruiting trees and forest patches above Afluente. Overnight at the new Abra Patricia Lodge just below the pass.

Day 16 – 4 November: Another day to plunder the avian riches of this super area. Overnight at Abra Patricia Lodge again.

Day 17 – 5 November: After birding the area around Aguas Verdes we headed towards the bustling city of Tarapoto. A few kilometers beyond Tarapoto, near the small town of Juan Guerra, is a very interesting region of dry forest with some pretty neat birds. We birded along the Rio Mayo and in a small wooded quebrada nearby. After which it was back to the madness that is Tarapoto. Overnight in Tarapoto at Cerro Verde Hotel.

Day 18 – 6 November: An early start (what else) got us to within a few kilometers of the tunnel on the Tarapoto to Yurimaguas road. However, drastic road improvement certainly did nothing to improve our chances of actually getting there! It was gridlock with traffic reduced to one lane so we got out and walked! This turned out to be a good move since we found a very busy fruiting tree stuffed with tanagers. Here, we were fortunate indeed to find a pair of Dotted Tanagers. We cut our losses here and returned to the quebrada near the Rio Mayo. The birding was excellent and we scored some nice specialities of the area. After lunch we headed back towards Moyobamba and spent the late afternoon and evening birding around the base of Morro de Calzada. It was obvious the weather was becoming unsettled and dark clouds loomed large on the horizon. Overnight in Moyobamba at Casona de Moyobamba Hotel.

Day 19 – 7 November: Rain! Too bad, for this promised to be a very exciting venture to an area I had not visited before. We drove to the extensively forested Quebrada Mishkiyaku, a short distance southeast of Moyobamba and spent the next few hours trudging through the rain. The habitat was great but the weather distinctly offputting, so we retreated with a rather modest list. It could have been so much better. We drove onwards to Rioja and the Restaurante Yacumama for an excellent and well-deserved lunch. The rain abated and we birded until evening in the interesting savanna and forest patches nearby. Overnight in Rioja at the decidedly scrappy Rocio Hotel!

Day 20 – 8 November: A long day of driving with frequent birding stops. First spot was the scrap of white sand forest above the small town of Aguas Verdes. After scoring the main targets here we slowly birded our way back up to Abra Patricia. Rain again featured at the upper levels. We had an early dinner in Pedro Ruiz and then drove three hours to the delightful Hacienda Chillo in the Utcubamba Valley, where we spent the night.

Day 21 – 9 November: An early foray along the road, which runs alongside the Rio Utcubamba, yielded some nice birds, including several Maranon endemics. The roosting Koepcke’s Screech-Owls were exactly where they should have been so all was well! We drove to the lovely Andean town of Leimebamba, where we had lunch. After this we drove to the forest fragments about 17 Km above town for the remainder of the afternoon until rain again stopped play. Not before we had seen a number of great birds though. Overnight in Leimebamba at Casona de Leymebamba Lodge.

Day 22 – 10 November: Back up to the forest fragments above Leimebamba and then onwards to the infamous Abra Barro Negro. After a scenic lunch we dropped down a considerable distance on a lovely winding road to our specially set up camp at Balsas.

Day 23 – 11 November: After a very pleasant breakfast in our camp we birded the immediate area for a little while before packing up and heading out for pastures new. First was the scrub above Limon, where we got lucky with our targets, and then up to more temperate forest patches closer to Celendin. Overnight at Celendin Hotel.

Day 24 – 12 November: We left Celendin early and birded our way to Cruz Conga. We did well and saw some nice highland species. As luck would have it we scored the “Cajamarca” Antpitta easily and were on our way again. The road had been washed out in a few places and progress was slow due to extensive roadworks as we made our way to the large and picturesque Andean city of Cajamarca. Overnight at Portada del Sol Hotel.

Day 25 – 13 November: An early start to be on-site for the Great Spinetail at San Marcos by a reasonable hour. We went straight to the site in the wooded ravine above San Marcos where I had seen them at last year, and, there they were! Amazing. We had a nice stress-free hike up the valley and then headed back to Cajamarca. In the afternoon we drove to the Gray-bellied Comet site along the Rio Chonta. The final bridge had been washed away so we had to walk a kilometer or two to reach the main area. We failed in our quest, what else is new, and returned to town after a nice walk around Las Ventanillas ruins. Overnight at Portada del Sol Hotel again.

Day 26 – 14 November: Another trip along the Rio Chonta for the Comet. I’m getting used to this now! We split up and it wasn’t long before the call came through that some of the group “had the bird”. A mad rush for some of us to get to the site, and the bird was nowhere to be seen! However, over the next couple of hours some of us managed to get brief flight views of a couple of nervous Comets. The highly territorial Giant Hummers were chasing everything and anything that trespassed. So, it was back to the airport at Cajamarca to say tearful farewells to Ali and to catch our (delayed) flight to Lima. Overnight at El Patio Hotel.

Day 27 – 15 November: It was with some relief that the weather looked to be near perfect for our all day pelagic. It was pretty flat and overcast at first but got decidedly lumpy farther out. We went out about 30 Km and chummed for storm-petrels. We did okay, but couldn’t buy a Ringed anywhere. However, we did well for most other expected species. The slow journey back to port was largely uneventful, though we did visit the famous sea lion rocks, which was a truly remarkable experience. Overnight at El Patio Hotel again.

Day 28 – 16 November: A super early start on the old Santa Eulalia road in order to be on-site for the Great Inca-Finch just after first light. We bagged some nice looks and drove up to look for the warbling-finch. Rather amazingly we nailed that one too, so, after some backtracking, we drove ever upwards to the polylepis site. Sadly, no cotingas due to the lateness of the hour but we did see a number of high elevation species new for the trip. And, even further along the road, towards Marcapomacocha, we saw most of the birds the area is famous for. There just remained the dreary Red Bull-fuelled drive back to Lima via the main highway. Last night at El Patio Hotel.

Day 29 – 17 November: The gang got up super early, about 2 am, for the transfer to the international airport for their flight back to Canada. After our farewells, I, however, returned to bed since I was flying to Buenos Aires later in the day!

Thus, the trip ended. It really was a great tour of some of the finest birding sites in the north of Peru. True, we were a bit rushed at most sites and certainly needed much more time in the Amazon. However, we were lucky with the weather and experienced only one morning of heavy rain. We recorded a huge number of birds and saw many of the very special ones very well indeed. We got lucky with some and failed with others…but that’s birding for you. I for one cannot wait to return to this very special part of the bird continent.

Bird species List:

The taxonomy used in this list roughly follows the 6th edition of the Clements Checklist of the Birds of the World.

White-throated Tinamou – Tinamus guttatus: Heard a few times at Allpahuayo/Mishana.

Cinereous Tinamou – Crypturellus cinereus: Heard at Explornapo.

Little Tinamou – C. soui: Heard at the base of Morro de Calzada.

Undulated Tinamou – C. undulatus: One was seen quite nicely in varzea at Muyuna. Otherwise commonly heard at Explornapo and Muyuna.

Tataupa Tinamou – C. tataupa: Heard along the seminario road near Jaen.

Andean Tinamou – Nothoprocta pentlandii: Three along the lower Santa Eulalia road included nice looks at a close, sitting individual.

White-tufted Grebe – Rollandia rolland: One was seen on the fresh water marsh near Puerto Eten.

Least Grebe – Tachybaptus dominicus: One was in the marsh surrounding the reservoir at Tinajones.

Pied-billed Grebe – Podilymbus podiceps: Four were seen in the marshes near the reservoir at Tinajones.

Silvery Grebe – Podiceps occipitalis: About 10 noted on a lake near Marcapomacocha.

Great Grebe – Podiceps major: Three were on the open water of the reservoir at Tinajones.

Humboldt Penguin – Spheniscus humboldti: Just three birds were seen on the pelagic out of Callao.

Waved Albatross – Phoebastria irrorata: Two were seen on the pelagic. One bird afforded great views as it sat on the sea in front of the boat.

White-chinned Petrel – Procellaria aequinactialis: About 30 seen on the pelagic – great looks at some.

Pink-footed Shearwater – Puffinus creatopus: At least 20 were seen on the pelagic.

Sooty Shearwater – P. griseus: Common on the pelagic.

Wilson’s Storm-Petrel – Oceanites oceanicus: Around 50 seen on the pelagic. Nice looks thanks to the chum.

White-vented Storm-Petrel – O. gracilis: The commonest storm-petrel on the pelagic with at least 100+ being logged.

Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel – Oceanodroma tethys: Great looks on the pelagic. About five birds were watched over the chum slick about 30 Km from shore – the farthest point.

Markham’s Storm-Petrel – O. markhami: About ten were noted on the pelagic. Most were seen at the farthest point when the chum was chucked overboard.

Peruvian Diving-Petrel – Pelecanoides garnotii: Three were seen on the pelagic.

Magnificent Frigatebird – Fregata magnificens: 12 sailed over us at Puerto Eten.

Peruvian Booby – Sula variegata: At least 1000+ were noted offshore from Puerto Eten. Noted as very common offshore from Callao.

Neotropic Cormorant – Phalacrocorax brasilianus: A large concentration of 1000+ birds was resting on a sandbar en route from Iquitos to Muyuna Lodge. Up to 25 were seen around the lodge at Muyuna. Up to 60 were seen offshore in the northwest. Also, noted as rather common offshore from Callao.

Guanay Cormorant – P. bougainvillii: Abundant offshore from Callao – many on breeding islands and cliffs.

Red-legged Cormorant – P. gaimardi: Six individuals of this lovely cormorant were seen around the sea lion islands offshore from Callao.

Peruvian Pelican – Pelecanus thagus: At least 2000+ were noted offshore from Puerto Eten. Also found to be abundant offshore from Callao.

Horned Screamer – Anhima cornuta: Rather common around Muyuna Lodge where as many as 20 were seen.

Andean Goose – Chloephaga melanoptera: About 15 near Marcapomacocha.

Muscovy Duck – Cairina moschata: Two were seen from the boat as we made our war from Iquitos to Explornapo.

Torrent Duck – Merganetta armata: A nice pair was seen below Abra Patricia and four were noted in the Utcubamba Valley.

Speckled Teal – Anas flavirostris: Three were seen on roadside pools between Celendin and Cajamarca. Also, two were noted near Marcapomacocha.

Blue-winged Teal – A. discors: Three were seen in the marshes around the reservoir at Tinajones.

Cinnamon Teal – A. cyanoptera: At least 35 were logged in the marshes at Tinajones.

Little Blue Heron – Egretta caerulea: Up to four in the northwest – mainly at Puerto Eten and Tinajones.

Snowy Egret – E. thula: Found to be scarce in Amazonia where three at Muyuna was the peak count. This species is much more numerous in the northwest, where up to 50 were seen, mostly in coastal lagoons and rice fields.

Cocoi Heron – Ardea cocoi: Common along rivers and lake margins in Amazonia, especially so around Muyuna, where up to 20 were noted.

Great Egret – Casmerodius albus: Commonly seen throughout in the lowlands. Especially common in Amazonia, where up to 40 were logged on various boat trips between lodges.

Cattle Egret – Bubulcus ibis: A common species throughout, especially so in the rice fields of the northwest.

Striated Heron – Butorides striata: This is a common species in Amazonia, especially so around Muyuna where up to 20 were seen daily. Otherwise small numbers were noted throughout the lowlands of the northwest.

Black-crowned Night-Heron – Nycticorax nycticorax: Two were seen at Puerto Eten, one at Jaen and another was seen at the dock near Callao.

Boat-billed Heron – Cochlearius cochlearius: A couple of birds were heard at night at Explornapo. Amazing spotlit views of eight birds were had on a nocturnal boat excursion at Muyuna.

Fasciated Tiger-Heron – Tigrisoma fasciatum: One was seen from the bus briefly as we traveled through the Utcubamba Valley. Luckily we had amazing scope views of a cooperative bird on the river below Abra Patricia. A trip highlight for some I think…

Rufescent Tiger-Heron – T. lineatum: A lovely adult bird was seen from the boat near Muyuna.

Least Bittern – Ixobrychus exilis: A flushed bird was seen briefly by some about 15 Km northeast of Bagua Chica.

Black-faced Ibis – Theristicus melanopis: Two were seen, albeit rather distantly, at the reservoir at Tinajones.

Green Ibis – Mesembrinibis cayennensis: One was heard at Muyuna.

Wood Stork – Mycteria americana: Three were seen at Muyuna.

Black Vulture – Coragyps atratus: Rather common and widespread throughout the north and around Lima.

Turkey Vulture – Cathartes aura: Commonly seen throughout. Three sailed over the sea lion rocks offshore from Callao.

Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture – C. burrovianus: Up to 30 were noted in Amazonia, mostly along rivers and over river islands.

Greater Yellow-headed Vulture – C. melambrotus: Small numbers were noted over forests in Amazonia.

Andean Condor – Vultur gryphus: At least five were seen, albeit rather distantly, along the upper Santa Eulalia road.

King Vulture – Sarcoramphus papa: A fine adult was seen from the canopy walkway at Explornapo. Otherwise two sailed high over Chaparri.

Osprey – Pandion haliaetus: Small numbers (max. four) were seen along rivers and lake margins in Amazonia. One was seen at Puerto Eten and two flew over the reservoir at Tinajones.

Gray-headed Kite – Leptodon cayanensis: Single adults were seen from the canopy walkway at Explornapo and at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Hook-billed Kite – Chondrohierax uncinatus: Up to two were seen at a small quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Swallow-tailed Kite – Elanoides forficatus: Rather scarce. One at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve was the only sighting in Amazonia. More frequently seen on the lower east slope, where up to 10 were noted, mostly around Afluente.

Slender-billed Kite – Rostrhamus hamatus: One was seen from the boat at Explornapo.

Double-toothed Kite – Harpagus bidentatus: We had great scope looks at two perched birds at Explornapo. Otherwise, one flew over us at Aguas Verdes.

Plumbeous Kite – Ictinia plumbea: Four were seen at Explornapo.

Plain-breasted Hawk – Accipter ventralis: Seen briefly by some at Abra Patricia.

Crane Hawk – Geranospiza caerulescens: A perched bird was seen at Muyuna.

Slate-colored Hawk – Leucopternis schistacea: One was seen well at Muyuna.

Great Black-Hawk – Buteogallus urubitinga: One was seen from the boat en route to Explornapo. Otherwise, we had great views of up to six birds at Muyuna.

Savanna Hawk – B. meriodionalis: Two were seen near Puerto Eten whilst three were noted at Tinajones.

Harris’s Hawk – Parabuteo unicinctus: One was seen flying over the road near Lomas de Lachay.

Black-collared Hawk – Busarellus nigricollis: Seen only in varzea at Muyuna, where rather common. We had amazing looks at up to 10 birds here.

Black-chested Buzzard-Eagle – Geranoaetus melanoleucus: Two were seen sailing over Lomas de Lachay. Otherwise a few were seen in the northwest, notably up to three at Chaparri and two at Rio Chonta.

Roadside Hawk – Buteo magnirostris: One or two birds were seen at scattered localities throughout the trip.

Broad-winged Hawk – Buteo platypterus: One was seen at Abra Patricia.

Short-tailed Hawk – B. brachyurus: One was seen at Explornapo. Otherwise a couple of singletons were seen near Afluente.

White-throated Hawk – B. albigula: One was soaring high over Abra Barro Negro.

Puna Hawk – B. poecilochrous: At least three were seen along the upper Santa Eulalia road.

Zone-tailed Hawk – B. albonotatus: One was seen near Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Black Caracara – Daptrius ater: Single birds were seen at Explornapo and Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve. Also, one was seen along the Rio Mayo near Juan Guerra.

Red-throated Caracara – Ibycter americanus: Heard a couple of times at Explornapo.

Mountain Caracara – Phalcoboenus megalopterus: No less than 12 were seen between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Crested Caracara – Polyborus cheriway: Two were seen near Chaparri.

Yellow-headed Caracara – Milvago chimachima: Commonly seen throughout Amazonia, especially so around Explornapo, where up to 30 were logged.

Lined Forest-Falcon – Micrastur gilvicolis: One was seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Buckley’s Forest-Falcon – M. buckleyi: One was heard in a forest patch near the restaurant Yacumama, near Rioja. We reeled the bird in quite close but it always remained out of sight.

American Kestrel – Falco sparverius: Scattered records of up to four birds throughout the trip. Found to be scarce in Amazonia but was more frequent in the northwest, especially so in the highlands. Also, one was seen along the Santa Eulalia road.

Aplomado Falcon – F. femoralis: One was seen at Abra dePorculla.

Bat Falcon – F. rufigularis: Nice looks at two birds perched above the jeep track at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Peregrine Falcon – F. peregrinus: Single birds were seen in Iquitos, near Lomas de Lachay and Puerto Eten. Also, one was seen far offshore on the pelagic out of Callao.

Speckled Chachalaca – Ortalis guttata: Noisy groups were heard at dawn at Explornapo and Muyuna. Otherwise a few were heard and seen between Moyabamba and Rioja.

White-winged Guan – P. albipennis: Endemic to the dry forests of the northwest. We had amazing looks at the reintroduced birds and wild-bred offspring, as many as 10, at Chaparri.

Spix’s Guan – P. jacquacu: Two were seen very well at Explornapo.

Sickle-winged Guan – Chamaepetes goudotii: One bird was seen briefly by the roadside near Abra Patricia and two were seen in the vicinity of the fruiting trees above Afluente.

Hoatzin – Opisthocomus hoazin: A group of six birds were seen in riverside trees en route to Explornapo. Otherwise, three were seen in dense cover along the Rio Mayo near Juan Guerra.

Russet-crowned Crake – Anurolimnas viridis: Heard in the savanna near the restaurant Yacumama, near Rioja.

Plumbeous Rail – Pardirallus sanguinolentus: One was seen very near Cruz Conga.

Purple Gallinule – Porphyrio martinicus: Up to six noted at Explornapo and two were seen at Muyuna.

Common Moorhen – Gallinula chloropus: An amazing concentration of at least 400+ was noted at the coastal lagoons near Puert Eten. Otherwise two were seen at the reservoir at Tinajones and two were seen in the rice fields 15 Km northeast of Bagua Chica.

Andean Coot – Fulica ardesiaca: Eight were seen on the reservoir at Tinajones.

Giant Coot – F. gigantea: Two were watched on a lake near Marcapomacocha.

Sunbittern – Eurypyga helias: Two rather tame birds frequented the area in front of the cabanas at Explornapo. Two were also seen from the boat at Muyuna.

Wattled Jacana – Jacana jacana: Commonly seen in Amazonia, where up to 40 were logged at Muyuna. Otherwise four birds were seen in the savanna near restaurant Yacumama.

Blackish Oystercatcher – Haematopus ater: Five were seen near the sea lion rocks out of Callao.

American Oystercatcher – H. palliatus: Two were seen on the beach at Chancay.

Black-necked Stilt – Himantopus mexicanus: At least 800+ were seen on the lagoons near Puerto Eten. Otherwise 40 were noted in the marshes around the reservoir at Tinajones and 15 in rice fields near Jaen.

Peruvian Thick-knee – Burhinus superciliaris: Two were seen in agricultural fields on the way out of Chaparri. Nicely spotted by our guide Thomas.

Pied Lapwing – Vanellus cayanus: Two were seen on a sand bar near Explornapo.

Andean Lapwing – V. resplendens: At least 10 were logged between Celendin and Cajamarca. Heard near Marcapomacocha.

Black-bellied Plover – Pluvialis squatarola: Four were on the beach at Chancay.

Killdeer – C. vociferus: One was seen on the beach at Puerto Eten.

Collared Plover – C. collaris: One was seen near Explornapo.

Snowy Plover – C. alexandrinus: Two were seen in the heat haze on the beach at Puerto Eten.

Diademed Sandpiper-Plover – Phegornis mitchellii: Two were seen at close range in a bog near Marcapomacocha. Some birds just never fail to impress…

Puna Snipe – Gallinago andina: Two were flushed from a bog near Marcapomacocha.

Whimbrel – Numenius phaeopus: Single birds were seen at Las Salinas, Chancay and at the dock near Callao.

Greater Yellowlegs – Tringa melanoleuca: Two were seen at Puerto Eten. Two more were in rice fields near Bagua Chica. Heard at Callao.

Lesser Yellowlegs – T. flavipes: Six at Puerto Eten was the sole record.

Solitary Sandpiper – T. solitaria: One on a river island near Iquitos was the only record.

Spotted Sandpiper – T. macularia: Scattered records of up to five birds in Amazonia and the Utcubamba Valley. Two were bobbing along the beach at the dock near Callao.

Ruddy Turnstone – Arenaris interpres: Five were seen on the beach at Chancay. Also 15 were feeding on the beach at the dock near Callao.

Surfbird – Aphriza virgata: At least 20 were on the rocks as we pulled out of the dock to begin the pelagic out of Callao.

Sanderling – Calidris alba: Seven were feeding along the tideline at Puerto Eten.

Semipalmated Sandpiper – C. pusilla: Three on the ultra saline pools near Las Salinas.

Least Sandpiper – C. minutilla: Four were on the saline pools near Las Salinas.

Wilson’s Phalarope – Phalaropus tricolor: Six were seen on the coastal lagoons near Puerto Eten.

Red-necked Phalarope – P. lobatus: Six were seen on the pelagic.

Red Phalarope – P. fulicaria: About 20 noted on the pelagic.

Rufous-bellied Seedsnipe – Attagis gayi: Five were seen near Marcapomacocha.

Gray-breasted Seedsnipe – Thinocorus orbignayianus: One bird was seen near Marcapomacocha.

Least Seedsnipe – T. rumicovorus: Eight gave nice views along the barren approach road to Lomas de Lachay.

South Polar Skua – Catharacta maccormicki: Four dark morph birds were seen on the pelagic.

Pomarine Jaeger – Stercorarius pomarinus: At least 25 were seen on the pelagic, including one flock of 10.

Parasitic Jaeger – S. parasiticus: Two were seen well on the pelagic.

Long-tailed Jaeger – S. longicaudus: An immature was watched over the chum about 30 Km out on the pelagic.

Belcher’s Gull – Larus belcheri: At least 30 were seen on the beach at Chancay. About 50 were noted on the pelagic.

Gray Gull – L. modestus: 30+ were seen on the pelagic.

Kelp Gull – L. dominicanus: Abundant offshore from Callao.

Gray-headed Gull – L. cirrocephalus: 12 where seen on the beach at Chancay, 20 at Puerto Eten and five were at the reservoir at Tinajones.

Andean Gull – L. serranus: Nine were logged between Celendin and Cajamarca. Two were seen near Marcapomacocha.

Franklin’s Gull – L. pipixcan: 200 were seen on the beach at Chancay and at least 500+ were at Puerto Eten. Large numbers were seen offshore from Callao.

Sabine’s Gull – Xema sabini: Three adult birds were seen far offshore on the pelagic.

Swallow-tailed Gull – Creagrus furcatus: Three, an adult and two immatures, were a welcome sight on the pelagic – excellent views as they took off from the sea in front of the boat.

Elegant Tern – S. elegans: About 400+ noted on the pelagic.

Sandwich Tern – Sterna sandvicensis: One close inshore on the pelagic.

Common Tern – S. hirundo: At least 10 on the pelagic.

Yellow-billed Tern – S. superciliaris: Very common along rivers in Amazonia. Up to 40 were seen at Muyuna.

Peruvian Tern – S. lorata: Six were seen well on the pelagic.

Large-billed Tern - Phaetusa simplex: Very common along rivers in Amazonia. Highest count was 250 en route to Muyuna.

Inca Tern – Larosterna inca: Abundant offshore from Callao.

Rock Pigeon – Columba livia: Sometimes common around human habitations throughout.

Band-tailed Pigeon – P. fasciata: Frequently seen in small numbers in the highlands of the northwest. Highest concentration was about 20 at the fruiting trees above Afluente.

Pale-vented Pigeon – P. cayennensis: Small numbers were seen in the eastern foothills, especially around Aguas Verdes.

Peruvian Pigeon – P. oenops: Four gave great flight looks on the seminario road near Jaen. Otherwise up to six were seen at the traditional site at Balsas.

Plumbeous Pigeon – P. plumbea: A common voice in the forest of Amazonia.

Ruddy Pigeon – P. subvinacea: Frequently heard in Amazonia. One or two were seen well in the Afluente area.

West Peruvian Dove – Zenaida meloda: Common around Lima and the lower Santa Eulalia road and the arid northwest.

Eared Dove – Z. auriculata: Common in the arid northwest and the highlands of the north. About 20+ were seen around Tarapoto, one of the few localities where this species can been seen in the eastern lowlands. At least 100+ were seen along the lower Santa Eulalia road.

Plain-breasted Ground-Dove – Columbina minuta: Two were seen in the savanna near Restaurante Yacumama.

Ruddy Ground-Dove – C. talpacoti: Small numbers, up to 10, were frequently seen in the eastern lowlands and foothills.

Ecuadorian Ground-Dove – C. buckleyi: Four were seen well along the seminario road near Jaen.

Croaking Ground-Dove – C. cruziana: Common around Lima and the lower Santa Eulalia road. This species is also in the arid northwest and in the dry intermontane valleys of the Maranon.

Blue Ground-Dove – Claravis pretiosa: Three were seen along the seminario road near Jaen and another was seen near the resturant Yacumama, near Rioja.

Bare-faced Ground-Dove – Metriopelia ceciliae: About 20 were seen on the rocky slopes along the lower Santa Eulalia road.

Black-winged Ground-Dove – M. melanoptera: 30+ were seen along the Santa Eulalia road.

White-tipped Dove – Leptotila verreauxi: Scattered records of up to six birds throughout the trip, though virtually absent from Amazonia.

Gray-fronted Dove – L. rufaxilla: Single birds were heard at Explornapo and seen at Muyuna.

Mitred Parakeet – Aratinga mitrata: At least 40 were seen flying over Pomacochas, up to six were noted in the Abra Patricia area, and 30 were seen well in the Utcubamba Valley near Tingo.

Red-masked Parakeet – A. erythrogenys: Six flyovers at Chaparri was the only record.

Scarlet-fronted Parakeet – A. wagleri: Three were seen along the seminario road near Jaen. Otherwise 23 were seen near Bagua Chica and two just west of Balsas.

White-eyed Parakeet – A. leucopthalmus: Common around Muyuna with a maximun of 120. Up to 20 were seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana and 30 in the Tarapoto/Juan Guerra area.

Dusky-headed Parakeet – A. weddellii: Common only at Muyuna, where up to 40 were noted.

Mountain Parakeet – Bolborhynchus aurifrons: Flocks totaling at least 20 birds were seen along the lower Santa Eulalia road.

Andean Parakeet – B. orbygnesius: A flock of six was seen at Rio Chonta.

Blue-winged Parrotlet – Forpus xanthopterygius: Two were seen at Muyuna. A few forpus Parrotlets seen from the bus near Iquitos were most probably this species.

Pacific Parrotlet – Forpus coerlestis: Common in the arid northwest, particularly at Chaparri, where at least 100+ were seen.

Yellow-faced Parrotlet – F. xanthops: Endemic to the upper Maranon Valley. Nice looks at two on the east side of the Maranon Valley as we approached Balsas. We also lucked into four on the west side as we traveled from Balsas to Limon.

Canary-winged Parakeet – Brotogeris versicolurus: Up to 50 were seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Cobalt-winged Parakeet – B. cyanoptera: Common in Amazonia, where up to 200 at Explornapo and 100 at Muyuna. Otherwise 10 were seen near Restaurante Yacumama near Rioja.

Tui Parakeet – B. sanctithomae: Just one was seen at Muyuna.

(Spot-winged Parrotlet – Touit stictoptera: Two calling birds glimpsed as they flew over Campamento Garcia were possibly this species)

Black-headed Parrot – Pionites melanocephala: A flock of 16 was seen from the canopy walkway at Explornapo and another was observed at Muyuna.

White-bellied Parrot – P. leucogaster: A flock of six was seen well at Muyuna.

Short-tailed Parrot – Graydidascalus brachyurus: Up to eight were logged at Muyuna.

Blue-headed Parrot – Pionus menstruus: Three at Explornapo and 20 flew over the savanna near restaurante Yacumama.

Red-billed Parrot – P. sordidus: Up to 10 birds were noted between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

Speckle-faced Parrot – P. tumultuosus senilis: Two singles were seen in forest patches above Leimebamba.

Festive Parrot – Amazona festiva: Up to six were seen at Muyuna.

Yellow-crowned Parrot – A. ochrocephala: At least 10 were seen from the canopy walkway at Explornapo. Otherwise fairly common at Muyuna, where up to eight were seen daily.

Orange-winged Parrot – A. amazonica: Seen only at Muyuna, where up to 30 were seen daily.

Scaly-naped Parrot – A. mercenaria: Three were seen at Abra Patricia.

Mealy Parrot – A. farinosa: Up to eight were seen at Explornapo. Slightly more numerous at Muyuna where up to 20 were logged.

Dark-billed Cuckoo – Coccyzus erythropthalmus: One at Explornapo was the sole record.

Squirrel Cuckoo – Piaya cayana: Scattered records of up to three birds from Amazonia and the eastern foothills.

Little Cuckoo – P. minuta: Heard tantalizingly close at Muyuna, but we could never actually see one.

Greater Ani – Crotophaga major: Small numbers at Explornapo and Muyuna.

Smooth-billed Ani – C. ani: Rather common in Amazonia and the eastern foothills.

Groove-billed Ani – C. sulcirostris: Up to 15 were seen in the arid northwest and the dry Maranon Valley.

Striped Cuckoo – Tapera naevia: Heard at Bagua Chica and another seen near Limon.

Barn Owl – Tyto alba: Heard in the grounds of Los Horcones Lodge at Tucume.

Tropical Screech-Owl – Megascops choliba: Heard at Explornapo and Muyuna.

Peruvian Screech-Owl – M. roboratus: One, out of two calling, seen well at Chaparri.

Koepcke’s Screech-Owl – M. koepckeae: Endemic to the west slope and dry intermontane valleys. Two were seen very well as they roosted in a favoured tree at Hacienda Chillo in the Utcubamba Valley.

Cinnamon Screech-Owl – M. petersoni: One heard at close range behind Abra Patricia Lodge but, frustratingly, would not allow itself to be seen. Next time…

Tawny-bellied Screech-Owl – M. watsonii: Heard at Explornapo and Muyuna.

White-throated Screech-Owl – M. albogularis: Up to three birds were heard calling distantly at Abra Patricia Lodge.

Rufous-banded Owl – Ciccaba albitarsis: Two were seen in the vicinity of Abra Patricia Lodge.

Spectacled Owl – Pulsatrix perspicillata: Heard at Explornapo.

Amazonian Pygmy-Owl – Glaucidium hardyi: Heard at Explornapo.

Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl – G. brasilianum: Heard at both Explornapo and Muyuna.

Peruvian Pygmy-Owl – G. peruanum: Two were seen at Bosque de Pomac. Otherwise singles were seen or heard at Chaparri and on the lower Santa Eulalia road.

Burrowing Owl – Athene cunicularia: Two were seen amidst the sand dunes near Puerto Eten.

Striped Owl – Pseudoscops clamator: One showed very well just before dusk in the savanna near Restaurante Yacumama, near Rioja. This is always a great bird to see.

Great Potoo – Nyctibius grandis: Three were spotlighted on a nocturnal boat trip at Muyuna.

Common Potoo – N. griseus: Several were calling at Explornapo and one was spotlit whilst on a nocturnal boat trip at Muyuna.

Rufous Potoo – N. bracteatus: Heard at Explornapo, but, unfortunately not close enough to see.

Short-tailed Nighthawk – Lurocalis semitorquatus: One at Explornapo.

Sand-colored Nighthawk – Chordeiles rupestris: At least 50 were seen at dusk swirling over the boat docks at Iquitos. It was quite a sight.

Lesser Nighthawk – C. acutipennis: Four were seen flying over the hotel grounds at Los Horcones Lodge at Tucume. Another was flushed in the daytime near Bagua Chica.

Common Nighthawk – C. minor: At least one was with Sand-colored Nighthawks at the boat dock in Iquitos at dusk.

Band-tailed Nighthawk – Nyctiprogne leucopyga: One was seen at dusk near Explornapo.

Pauraque – Nyctidromus albicollis: Four were seen at Explornapo and three on the nocturnal boat trip at Muyuna.

Spot-tailed Nightjar – Caprimulgus maculicaudus: One was seen at dusk in the savanna near Restaurante Yacumama, near Rioja.

Scrub Nightjar – C. anthonyi: Single birds were seen at Los Horcones Lodge at Tucume and flushed from the cactus-dominated scrub near Bagua Chica.

Blackish Nightjar – C. nigrescens: Three birds gave great pre-dusk views on the trail near the base of Morro de Calzada.

Ladder-tailed Nightjar – Hydropsalis climacocerca: One was seen very well in the spotlight whilst on the nocturnal boat trip at Muyuna.

Chestnut-collared Swift – Cypseloides rutilus: Recorded only at Abra Patricia, where up to 20 were logged.

White-collared Swift – Streptoprocne zonaris: Up to 200 were seen at Abra Patricia. Otherwise small numbers were seen at various sites between Afluente and Tarapoto.

Pale-rumped Swift – Chaetura egrigia: At least 10 were seen very well from the canopy walkway at Explornapo. Otherwise, only seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve, where up to 10 were recorded.

Chimney Swift – C. pelagica: One was seen well as it whizzed around with various swallow species (including Cliff) over reservoir at Tinajones.

Amazonian Swift – C. viridipennis: We were pretty sure that some of the chaetura swifts watched from the canopy walkway at Explornapo could have been this species. Otherwise, three uniformly dark chaetura swifts seen flying over an early successional river island near Iquitos were thought to be this species.

Short-tailed Swift – C. brachyura: Small numbers were noted at several Amazonian sites with a maximum of eight at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

White-tipped Swift – Aeronautes montivagus: Six at Abra Porculla. Up to 12 were seen near Campamento Garcia.

Andean Swift – A. andecolus: Up to eight were seen at the Rio Chonta site near Cajamarca.

Fork-tailed Palm-Swift – Tachornis squamata: Commonly seen throughout Amazonia with a maximum of 20 at Muyuna.

Rufous-breasted Hermit – Glaucis hirsuta: One-two seen at Explornapo, Muyuna and Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Pale-tailed Barbthroat – Threnetes leucurus: We had great looks at a perched bird at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Green Hermit – Phaethornis guy: Just one was seen briefly at Aguas Verdes.

Eastern Long-tailed Hermit – P. superciliosus: One was seen at Muyuna.

Tawny-bellied Hermit – P. syrmatophorus: One was seen below Campamento Garcia.

White-bearded Hermit – P. hispidus: One was seen at Explornapo Lodge.

Koepcke’s Hermit – P. koepckeae: Endemic, and very local, on the east slope of the Peruvian Andes. One was seen about four Km below the tunnel on the Tarapoto – Yurimaguas road.

Reddish Hermit – P. ruber: One was watched at close range from the canopy walkway at Explornapo.

Gray-chinned Hermit – P. griseogularis: Two of the form porcullae were seen at Abra de Porculla. One individual, probably of the form zonura, was seen at the quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Green-fronted Lancebill – Doryfera ludovicae: One was seen briefly near Afluente.

Gray-breasted Sabrewing – Campylopterus largipennis: One was seen in the small quebrada near Juan Guerra.

White-necked Jacobin – Florisuga mellivora: Two were seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Sparkling Violet-ear – C. coruscans: Just one was seen at Pomacochas.

Blue-tailed Emerald – Chlorostilbon mellisugus: One was seen at the quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Fork-tailed Woodnymph – Thalurania furcata: A male was noted at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Rufous-throated Sapphire – Hylocharis sapphirina: A nice male was watched at close range on a mature river island near Explornapo.

Golden-tailed Sapphire – Chrysuronia oenone: A male was seen at Restaurante Yacumama, near Rioja.

Tumbes Hummingbird – Leucippus baeri: Nice looks at two birds at Chaparri.

Spot-throated Hummingbird – L. taczanowskii: Endemic to the dry Maranon Valley and the west slope of the Peruvian Andes. Pretty common in dry intermontane valleys in the Maranon, particularly so at San Marcos where we logged at least 20 birds.

Olive-spotted Hummingbird – L. chlorocercus: Four were seen on river islands near Explornapo.

White-bellied Hummingbird – L. chionogaster: Six were seen well in the Utcubamba Valley, mostly near Hacienda Chillo.

Many-spotted Hummingbird – L. hypostictus: One was seen very well perching atop bare branches near the fruiting tree about four Km below the tunnel on the Tarapoto – Yurimaguas road.

Amazilia Hummingbird – Amazilia amazilia: Very common in the arid northwest with a maximum of 30 at Chaparri. Otherwise three were seen at San Marcos.

Glittering-throated Emerald – A. fimbriata: Two were seen at Muyuna.

Andean Emerald – A. franciae: Two were seen in the Utcubamba Valley.

Ecuadorian Piedtail – Phlogophilus hemileucurus: One was seen nicely near Afluente.

Speckled Hummingbird – Adelomyia melanogenys: Just one was seen, near above Afluente.

Black-breasted Hillstar – Oreotrochilus leucopleurus: Endemic to the high Andes of central Peru. A superb male was seen at a favoured patch of flowers near Marcapomacocha as we ate our “late” picnic lunch.

Shining Sunbeam – Aglaeactis cupripennis: At least eight were seen in scrub on both sides of Abra Barro Negro.

Mountain Velvetbreast – Lafresnaya lafresnayi: Two singles were seen in remnant forest patches about 17 Km above Leimebamba.

Bronzy Inca – Coeligenera coeligenera: One was seen briefly above Campamento Garcia.

Collared Inca – C. torquata: Up to three were seen below Abra Patricia.

Violet-throated Starfrontlet – C. violifer: Two singles were seen in forest patches about 17 Km above Leimebamba.

Rainbow Starfrontlet – C. iris: Two were seen about 17 Km above Leimebamba. Otherwise three were logged above Limon and another between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Sword-billed Hummingbird – Ensifera ensifera: One whizzed over Abra Patricia Lodge.

Giant Hummingbird – Patagonia gigas: One was seen in the Utcabamba Valley near Hacienda Chillo. Fairly common along Rio Chonta where up to six very territorial birds protected their flower patches vigorously!

Amethyst-throated Sunangel – Heliangelus amethysticollis: Two obliging males were seen at ultra close range about 17 Km above Leimebamba.

Purple-throated Sunangel – H. viola: A male was seen near Pomacochas.

Royal Sunangel – H. regalis: Endemic to outlying ridges in the northeastern Andes. The usual male was seen above Campamento Garcia. What a bird…

Sapphire-vented Puffleg – Eriocnemis luciani: Four were seen in forest scraps below the pass at Abra Barro Negro.

Emerald-bellied Puffleg – E. alinae: One was seen very nicely near Pomacochas. Another was seen above Campamento Garcia.

Booted Racket-tail – Ocreatus underwoodi: One was seen below Campamento Garcia.

Black-tailed Trainbearer – Lesbia victoriae: Frequently seen in the temperate zone on both sides of the Maranon with a maximum of four between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Green-tailed Trainbearer – L. nuna: Two were seen at Pomacochas. Otherwise one was seen above Leimebamba and up to five at Rio Chonta.

Bronze-tailed Comet – Polyonymus caroli: Endemic to the west slope of the Peruvian Andes. One was seen along the lower Santa Eulalia road.

Tyrian Metaltail – M. tyrianthina: A few were seen in temperate scrub on both sides of the Maranon with a maximum of three at Rio Chonta.

Coppery Metaltail – Metallura theresiae: Endemic to the east slope of the Peruvian Andes. One was seen briefly below the pass at Abra Barro Negro.

Black Metaltail – M. phoebe: Endemic to the west slope of the Peruvian Andes. Common at Rio Chonta, where up to six were seen very well. Four were seen along the upper Santa Eulalia road.

Gray-bellied Comet – Taphrolesbia griseiventris: Endemic to the west side of the Maranon Valley. A male and female were seen at Rio Chonta, though they were frustratingly elusive and not seen by all.

Long-tailed Sylph – Aglaiocercus coelestris: Two singles were seen above Afluente.

Marvelous Spatuletail – Loddigesia mirabilis: Endemic to the Utcubamba Valley. At least three males and two females were seen at the usual locality near Pomacochas. We were treated to the amazing sight of two males facing-off whilst a female sat nearby looking distinctly unimpressed! A trip highlight, even if one has seen this remarkable hummer before.

Oasis Hummingbird – Rhodopis vesper: Two were noted at Lomas de Lachay.

Peruvian Sheartail – Thaumastura cora: Two males were seen at Chaparri.

Purple-collared Woodstar – Myrtis fanny: Common in the northwest with up to 10 at Abra Porculla and 20 along the seminario road near Jaen. Two were seen along the lower Santa Eulalia road.

Short-tailed Woodstar – Myrmia micrura: Four were seen at Bosque de Pomac with another two at Chaparri. A super sprite!

White-bellied Woodstar – Acestura mulsant: A female was seen at Balsas.

Little Woodstar – A. bombus: Two females gave great looks in the Utcubamba Valley at Hacienda Chillo.

Amazonian White-tailed Trogon – Trogon viridis: Heard at Explornapo. Three were seen at the quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Amazonian Violaceous Trogon – T. violaceus: A male was seen briefly at Muyuna.

Collared Trogon – T. collaris: Three were seen well at Muyuna.

Masked Trogon – T. personatus: A male was seen nicely below Abra Patricia.

Blue-crowned Trogon – T. curucui: One was heard at Muyuna.

Black-tailed Trogon – T. melanurus: Four were seen at Muyuna.

Crested Quetzal – Pharomachrus antisianus: Heard once below Campamento Garcia.

Golden-headed Quetzal – P. auriceps: Two were seen at Abra Patricia Lodge.

Ringed Kingfisher – Ceryle torquata: Common in Amazonia, especially so at Muyuna where we saw around 20 one day. A few scattered singles were seen in the northwest and lower east slope.

Amazon Kingfisher – Chloroceryle amazona: Frequently seen in Amazonia, again, especially common at Muyuna where we logged a maximum of 10. Otherwise, one was seen in the Utcubamba Valley near Hacienda Chillo.

Green Kingfisher – C. Americana: Up to two per day at Muyuna and a single bird at Balsas was about it.

American Pygmy Kingfisher – C. aenea: Nice looks at a perched bird at Muyuna.

Blue-crowned Motmot – Momotus momota: Heard at Explornapo, Muyuna and Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Broad-billed Motmot – Electron platyrhynchum: One was heard just before dusk at the base of Morro de Calzada.

White-eared Jacamar – Galbalcyrhynchus leucotis: Common at Muyuna where we recorded up to 15 daily.

Yellow-billed Jacamar – Galbula albirostris: One was seen briefly at Explornapo.

Blue-cheeked Jacamar – G. cyanicollis: Two showed well in terra firme forest at Muyuna.

Bluish-fronted Jacamar – G. cyanescens: One was seen in varzea at Muyuna and two were in the small quebrada near Juan Guerra.

White-chinned Jacamar – G. tombacea: One gave great views right by the lodge at Explornapo.

Paradise Jacamar – G. dea: Just one was seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

White-necked Puffbird – Notharchus macrorhynchos: One was seen from the canopy walkway at Explornapo.

Brown-banded Puffbird – Notharchus ordii: One posed well at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Spotted Puffbird – Bucco tamatia: Great looks at one at Explornapo.

Rufous-capped Nunlet – Nonnula ruficapilla: One seen in varzea at Muyuna failed to hang around for the crowd…

Black-fronted Nunbird – Monasa nigrifrons: Rather common in Amazonia, especially so at Muyuna where we logged up to 20 daily.

White-fronted Nunbird – M. morphoeus: Heard at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Yellow-billed Nunbird – M. flavirostris: Three were watched at close range along the jeep track at Allpahuayo/Mishana.

Swallow-wing – Chelidoptera tenebrosa: Up to six were seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana. Amazingly, we saw none anywhere else in Amazonia.

Scarlet-crowned Barbet – Capito aurovirens: Recorded only at Muyuna where we saw up to six daily.

Gilded Barbet – C. auratus: Up to six were seen at Explornapo. Heard commonly at Muyuna and Allpahyuayo/Mishana reserve. A few were also seen in the eastern foothills between Juan Guerra and Rioja.

Lemon-throated Barbet – Eubucco richardsoni: Just one was seen at Muyuna, where a few others were heard.

Versicolored Barbet – E. versicolor: A total of four were seen at two sites above Afluente. A truly stunning bird!

Andean Toucanet – Aulacorhynchus albivitta: Up to three were seen below Abra Patricia.

Chestnut-tipped Toucanet – A. derbianus: Two were seen at Afluente.

Lettered Aracari – Pteroglossus inscriptus: Two were seen at Explornapo and two were noted at restaurante Yacumama, near Rioja.

Chestnut-eared Aracari – P. castanotis: Up to six were seen at Explornapo, Muyuna and in the eastern foothills.

Many-banded Aracari – P. pluricinctus: At least 15 were seen from the canopy walkway at Explornapo.

Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan – Andigena hypoglauca: Heard, and then miraculously seen in the forest patch 17 Km above Leimebamba. Three cheers for Bob!

Golden-collared Toucanet – Selenidera reinwardtii: Four were seen from the canopy walkway at Explornapo.

Yellow-ridged Toucan – Ramphastos culminatus: Two were seen from the canopy walkway at Explornapo. Otherwise, heard commonly at Muyuna, Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve and Juan Guerra.

Cuvier’s Toucan – R. cuvieri: A few were heard and seen at various sites in Amazonia.

Lafresnaye’s Piculet – Picumnus lafresnayi: Three were seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku, near Moyobamba.

Ecuadorian Piculet – P. sclateri: Six were seen at Abra de Porculla.

Speckle-chested Piculet – P. steindachneri: Endemic to the east slope of the northern Andes of Peru. One was eventually found in the big flock at Km 401 above Afluente. At last!!

Plain-breasted Piculet – P. castelnau: One was seen well on a mature river island near Explornapo.

Yellow-tufted Woodpecker – Melanerpes cruentatus: Commonly seen or heard at various sites in Amazonia and the eastern foothills.

Scarlet-backed Woodpecker – Veniliornis callonotus: At least 10 were logged at Bosque de Pomac and a single bird was seen along the seminario road near Jaen.

Smoky-brown Woodpecker – V. fumigatus: Two were seen at Abra de Porculla and another above Limon.

Little Woodpecker – V. passerinus: One or two were seen at various sites in Amazonia and in the eastern foothills.

Red-stained Woodpecker – V. affinis: Three singles were seen at Explornapo and Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Golden-olive Woodpecker – Piculus rubinosus: Four were seen at Bosque de Pomac, one at Abra de Porculla and two above Afluente.

Crimson-mantled Woodpecker – P. rivolii: One was seen in a flock just below Abra Patricia Lodge.

Black-necked Woodpecker – Colaptes atricollis: Endemic to the west slope and the dry Maranon Valley. Two were seen in the Utcubamba Valley at Hacienda Chillo, and another was recorded at San Marcos.


Spot-breasted Woodpecker – C. punctigula: One was seen at Explornapo, two at Muyuna and another single at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Andean Flicker – C. rupicola: Common in the highlands on both sides of the Maranon with maximum counts of six above Leimebamba and six between Limon and Celendin.

Scaly-breasted Woodpecker – Celeus grammicus: One was seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Chestnut Woodpecker – C. elegans: One was seen at Explornapo and two were noted at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Lineated Woodpecker – Dryocopus lineatus: Just one at Bosque de Pomac.

Crimson-crested Woodpecker – C. melanoleucus: Up to three were seen at Muyuna, whilst another was recorded at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Plain-brown Woodcreeper – Dendrocincla fuliginosa: Single birds were noted at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve and at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Long-tailed Woodcreeper – Deconychura longicauda: One was seen above Afluente.

Olivaceous Woodcreeper – Sittasomus griseicapillus: Only one, at Muyuna.

Wedge-billed Woodcreeper – Glyphorynchus spirurus: Scattered singletons at Muyuna and Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Long-billed Woodcreeper – Nasica longirostris: Heard near Explornapo. We had great looks at this impressive woodcreeper at Muyuna, where we noted up to three birds.

Cinnamon-throated Woodcreeper – Dendrexteastes rufigula: Two were seen at Explornapo with another at Muyuna.

Strong-billed Woodcreeper – Xiphocolaptes promeropirhynchus: One was heard at Abra Patricia Lodge.

Straight-billed Woodcreeper – Xiphorhynchus picus: One or two birds were noted at Muyuna on two dates.

Striped Woodcreeper – X. obsoletus: One or two were seen nicely in varzea at Muyuna on two dates.

Ocellated Woodcreeper – X. ocellatus: Two singles were seen well at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Buff-throated Woodcreeper – X. guttatus: Two were seen at Explornapo.

Olive-backed Woodcreeper – X. triangularis: three singles were seen within flocks below Campamento Garcia.

Streak-headed Woodcreeper – Lepidocolaptes souleyetii: One was seen at Bosque de Pomac.

Lineated Woodcreeper – L. albolineatus: Just one was seen at Explornapo.

Grayish Miner – Geositta maritima: Six were seen in the arid southern sector of Lomas de Lachay.

Coastal Miner – G. peruviana: Endemic to the coastal plain. Two showed well along the barren approach road to Lomas de Lachay. Another was seen in the dunes near Puerto Eten.

Thick-billed Miner – G. crassirostris: Endemic to the coastal lomas and west slope of the Andes in central Peru. Two birds were seen on rocky slopes along the lower Santa Eulalia road.

Slender-billed Miner – G. tenuirostris: Two were seen nicely in the highlands between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Plain-breasted Earthcreeper – Upcerthia jelskii: About six were seen along the upper Santa Eulalia road.

Bar-winged Cinclodes – Cinclodes fuscus: Two were noted between Celendin and Cajamarca. At least six were noted along the upper Santa Eulalia road.

White-winged Cinclodes – C. atacamensis: Recorded only at Rio Chonta, where up to 10 could be found. Great views!

White-bellied Cinclodes – C. palliates: Endemic to high altitude bogs of west-central Peru. Three birds were seen together near Marcapomacocha.

Lesser Hornero – Furnarius minor: One was a last minute save at dusk on an early successional river island near Iquitos.

Pale-legged Hornero – F. leucopus: Single birds were seen and heard at Explornapo and Muyuna. Otherwise a couple of birds were seen along the Rio Mayo near Juan Guerra.

Pacific Hornero – F. cinnamomeus: Very common in the arid northwest with as many as 40 at Bosque de Pomac and around Jaen.

Rusty-crowned Tit-Spinetail – Leptasthenura pileata: Endemic to the Andes of north and central Peru. Three of the form cajabambae were seen at Rio Chonta. Two of the form pileata were seen along the Santa Eulalia road.

White-chinned Thistletail – Schizoeaca fuliginosa: The distinctive form peruviana is Endemic to the east slope of north-central Peruvian Andes. Nice looks at four birds in the forest fragments about 17 km above Leimebamba.

Rufous Spinetail – Synallaxis unirufa: Up to three were seen or heard below the pass at Abra Patricia and at Campamento Garcia.

Azara’s Spinetail – S. azarae: Commonly heard and up to four seen at Abra Patricia and above Leimebamba.

Dark-breasted Spinetail – S. albigularis: Two were seen in the savanna near Restaurante Yacumama, near Rioja. Otherwise heard in the white sand forest fragments near Aguas Verdes.

Dusky Spinetail – S. moesta: Two elusive birds were eventually taped out into view in the white sand forest fragments near Aguas Verdes

White-bellied Spinetail – S. propinqua: A few were heard on an early successional river island near Explornapo. Eight were seen and a few others heard on the young river island near Iquitos.

Ruddy Spinetail – S. rutilans: Two were seen briefly at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Chestnut-throated Spinetail – S. cherriei: Two were seen very well in the small quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Necklaced Spinetail – S. stictothorax: Very common at Bosque de Pomac, where at least 20 were seen.

Chinchipe Spinetail – S. chinchipensis: Endemic to the middle Maranon and Chinchipe drainages. One was a last minute save along the seminario road near Jaen. Sometimes lumped with the preceding species.

Line-cheeked Spinetail – Cranioleuca antisiensis: Nice looks at eight birds at Abra de Porculla.

Baron’s Spinetail – C. baroni: Endemic to the Andes of north-central Peru. Six were logged in the Utcubamba Valley and four were seen between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Ash-browed Spinetail – C. curtata: Up to six birds were noted in the big flocks above Afluente. It was nice to obtain repeated close studies of this interesting spinetail.

Parker’s Spinetail – C. vulpecula: One was seen briefly on the edge of a mature river island near Explornapo.

Speckled Spinetail – C. gutturata: Two singles were with canopy flocks at Muyuna.

Red-and-white Spinetail – C. mustelina: Up to five were seen in riverside vegetation at Explornapo and Muyuna.

Canyon Canastero – Asthenes pudibunda: Two were seen along the Santa Eulalia road.

Cactus Canastero – A. cactorum: Endemic to the west slope in central and southern Peru. A pair attending a nest in the arid southern sector of Lomas de Lachay gave reasonable scope views.

Streak-throated Canastero – A. humilis: Two were seen in scrappy fields between Celendin and Cajamarca. Also, four were noted near Marcapomacocha.

Streak-backed Canastero – A. wyatti: An organized flush through some bunchgrass between Celendin and Cajamarca produced two birds.

Many-striped Canastero – A. flammulata: One was seen, and a few others heard, just above the treeline below Abra Barro Negro.

Junin Canastero – A. virgata: Endemic to the high Andes of central and southern Peru. Several where heard in bunchgrass near Marcapomacocha.

Great Spinetail – Siptornopsis hypochondriacus: Endemic to the upper Maranon Valley. A pair gave an epic performance at the usual spot above San Marcos.

Rufous-fronted Thornbird – Phacellodomus rufifrons: Six were seen near Moyabamba.

Chestnut-backed Thornbird – P. dorsalis: Endemic to the central Maranon valley. One showed brilliantly above Limon.

Russet-mantled Softtail – P. berlepschi: Endemic to the east slope of the northern Peruvian Andes. Two were seen on both days at Km 17 above Leimebamba. They were with a large, fast moving flock but proved reliable if one was patient and waited for the flock to materialize and pass through.

Wren-like Rushbird – Phleocryptes melanops: Several were heard, and a couple seen, in coastal reed beds near Puerto Eten.

Orange-fronted Plushcrown – Metopothrix aurantiacus: One was seen in varzea at Muyuna.

Equatorial Graytail – Xenerpestes singularis: two were seen in the big flock at Km 401 above Afluente.

Spotted Barbtail – Premnoplex brunnescens: Heard at Abra Patricia.

Pearled Treerunner – Margorornis squamiger: Seen only in the forest scraps above Leimebamba, where up to 4 were seen on two dates.

Streaked Tuftedcheek – Pseudocolaptes boissonneaultii: One or two on a few occasions at Abra Patricia and four in the flock above Leimebamba.

Buff-browed Foliage-gleaner – Syndactyla rufosuperciliata: One was seen in a flock below Campamento Garcia.

Rufous-necked Foliage-gleaner – S. ruficollis: Two gave prolonged looks at Abra de Porculla.

Montane Foliage-gleaner – Anabacerthia striaticollis: A couple of singles were seen below Abra Patricia.

Striped Treehunter – Thripadectes holostictus: One was seen in a flock below Campamento Garcia.

Ruddy Foliage-gleaner – Automolus rubiginosus: One was seen briefly in the white sand forest near Aguas Verdes and another was heard between there and Afluente.

Chestnut-crowned Foliage-gleaner – A. rufipileatus: Great looks of a pair in the quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Henna-hooded Foliage-Gleaner – Hylocryptus erythrocephalus: Amazingly, as many as six were seen at Abra de Porculla. A beast of a furnariid!!

Streaked Xenops – X. rutilans: Just one in a flock above Afluente.

Fasciated Antshrike – Cymbilaimus lineatus: Heard from the canopy walkway at Explornapo.

Great Antshrike – Taraba major: A male was seen near Muyuna and one was heard at the quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Collared Antshrike – Sakesphorus bernardi: The nominate form was common at Bosque de Pomac (15), Chaparri and Abra Porculla. Two of the Maranon form shumbae were seen in cactus-dominated scrub near Bagua Chica.

Barred Antshrike – Thamnophilus doliatus: Two were seen at Muyuna. Otherwise single birds were heard at Allpahuayo/Mishana and Juan Guerra.

Chapman’s Antshrike – T. zarumae: Repeated good looks at several birds at Abra de Porculla.

Lined Antshrike – T. tenuepunctatus: A few were heard and seen above Afluente.

Castelnau’s Antshrike – T. cryptoleucus: Brilliant looks at a pair on a mature river island near Explornapo.

Uniform Antshrike – T. unicolor: Two were seen at a regular site above Campamento Garcia.

Plain-winged Antshrike – T. schistaceus: A pair gave nice looks at Muyuna.

Mouse-colored Antshrike – T. murinus: Just one was seen at Explornapo, but many others were heard both there and at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Northern Slaty-Antshrike – T. punctatus: A male of the form leucogaster gave great views along the seminario road near Jaen. A male of the Endemic form huallagae was seen quite well in a wooded quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Amazonian Antshrike – T. amazonicus: A bright female was seen near Muyuna.

Variable Antshrike – T. caerulescens: Two were seen at Abra Patricia Lodge. Others were heard in the same general area on two other days.

Rufous-capped Antshrike – T. ruficapillus: Two showed well at times in a small bamboo-choked gully near Pomacochas. Another was heard at the Spatuletail site nearby.

Spot-winged Antshrike – Pygiptila stellaris: Four were seen at Muyuna, allowing great looks at times.

Pearly Antshrike – Megastictus margaritatus: A flighty male gave brief but good perched looks for some at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Plain Antvireo – Dysithamnus mentalis: Two were seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku, near Moyobamba.

Cinereous Antshrike – Thamnomanes caesius: One highly vocal male was seen in an understory flock at Explornapo.

Bluish-slate Antshrike – T. schistogynus: One was seen well in an understory flock at Muyuna.

Pygmy Antwren – Myrmotherula brachyura: Up to four seen at Explornapo and a couple of single birds were noted at Muyuna.

Amazonian Streaked-Antwren – M. multostriata: Four showed well in riverside forest at Muyuna.

Stripe-chested Antwren – M. longicauda: Amazing close looks at a couple of males in dry scrub near Juan Guerra.

Plain-throated Antwren – M. hauxwelli: A pair showed quite well on the trail behind the lodge at Muyuna.

White-flanked Antwren – M. axillaris: Up to four were seen at Explornapo, up to two at Allpahuayo/Mishana, and two at Quebrada Mishkiyaku, near Moyabamba.

Long-winged Antwren – M. longipennis: One was seen in a flock at Explornapo and two were noted at Muyuna.

Gray Antwren – M. menetriesii: Four were seen at Muyuna, whilst another was heard at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Leaden Antwren - M. assimilis: Great looks of a pair on a mature river island near Explornapo.

Ash-throated Antwren – Herpsilochmus parkeri: Endemic to the Rio Mayo drainage. It took a while but eventually a pair of this lovely herpsilochmus did put in an appearance at Km 401 above Afluente. As is usually the case with this genus patience is required. They are often heard long before they can actually be seen, as they appear to be rather slow moving and independent of the main flock.

Ancient Antwren – H. gentryi: Nice looks at a pair of this restricted range herpsilochmus at Allpahuayo/Mishana.

Yellow-breasted Antwren – H. axillaris: Heard a couple of times and then finally seen in the big flock at Km 401 above Afluente. We ended up with great scope views of this elusive canopy species.

Long-tailed Antbird – Drymophila caudata: Quite common in bamboo at Abra Patricia, where we had some great looks at this flashy drymophila.

Rufous-rumped Antwren – Terenura callinota: One was seen in a fast moving flock above Afluente.

Gray Antbird – Cercomacra cinerascens: Heard at Explornapo. Two were eventually seen in a canopy flock at Muyuna.

Blackish Antbird – C. nigrescens: Heard a few times and eventually seen very well at Afluente and in the quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Black Antbird – C. serva: Heard late in the day at the base of Morro de Calzada.

White-browed Antbird – Myrmoborus leucophrys: Great looks at two in the quebrada near Juan Guerra. This species is very common here and we heard many others in the general area.

Ash-breasted Antbird – M. lugubris: Sadly, heard only, on a mature river island near Iquitos. We were unlucky as this attractive antbird is usually not too difficult.

Black-faced Antbird – M. myotherinus: Frustrating for some, a pair of this handsome species played hide-and-seek with us at Allpahuayo/Mishana.

Warbling Antbird – Hypocnemis cantator: Two were seen at Explornapo.

Yellow-browed Antbird – H. hypoxantha: Great looks at a pair at Allpahuayo/Mishana.

Band-tailed Antbird – Hypocnemoides maculicauda: Several were seen brilliantly in varzea at Muyuna.

Black-and-white Antbird – Myrmochanes hemileucus: Nice looks at a pair on a young river island near Explornapo.

Silvered Antbird – Sclateria naevia: Nice, close looks of a couple of individuals in varzea at Muyuna.

Spot-winged Antbird – Percnostola leucostigma: A female showed very well at Muyuna. Otherwise two were seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Zimmer’s Antbird – Myrmeciza castanea: Frustratingly heard only, and rather distantly, at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve. Luckily we obtained great views of two birds in the white sand forest above Aguas Verdes.

Plumbeous Antbird – M. hyperythra: Up to four showed amazingly well in varzea at Muyuna. The female of this chunky species is particularly attractive…

White-shouldered Antbird – M. melanoceps: One heard in varzea near the lodge at Explornapo, but was too far away to be reeled in.

Sooty Antbird – M. fortis: Nice looks at a vocal male at Explornapo.

Scale-backed Antbird – Hylophylax poecilonotus: A female was seen briefly at Explornapo, Excellent views of a pair at Allpahuayo/Mishana. What a great bird!

Black-spotted Bare-eye – Phlegopsis nigromaculata: A vocal individual gave frustratingly brief views as it circled us along the terra firme trail above the lodge at Muyuna.

Rufous-capped Antthrush – Formicarius colma: Heard at Explornapo. One was heard at Explornapo.

Rufous-breasted Antthrush – F. rufipectus: Heard once below Abra Patricia.

Striated Antthrush – Chamaeza nobilis: Several were heard from the canopy walkway at Explornapo. We thought we would have a go at actually seeing one the next day…but failed to even hear any!

Undulated Antpitta – Grallaria squamigera: One was heard at close range in roadside forest at Km 17 above Leimebamba.

Chestnut-crowned Antpitta – G. ruficapilla: Just one was actually seen, at Abra de Porculla. Otherwise commonly heard at Abra de Porculla, Pomacochas, in the Utcubamba Valley, above Leimebamba, Limon, and between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Stripe-headed Antpitta – G. andicola: One showed well for some in the polylepis along the upper Santa Eulalia road.

Rusty-tinged Antpitta – G. przewalskii: Endemic to the east slope of the north-central Andes. Several were heard at and below Abra Patricia, but none were close enough to reel in.

Rufous Antpitta – G. rufula: We recorded two very distinctive forms on this trip. Firstly, the form obscura Endemic to the east slope of the central and northern Peruvian Andes south of the Maranon. We had nice looks at a couple of birds in forest patches about 17 Km above Leimebamba. Also, we had nice looks at a cooperative bird of the form cajamarcae, which is Endemic to the west slope of the northern Peruvian Andes, near Cruz Conga.

Chestnut Antpitta – G. blakei: Endemic to the east slope of the north-central Andes. One was heard and then seen very well along the muddy trail at Valle Hermoso, below Abra Patricia.

Rusty-belted Tapaculo – Lioseles thoracicus: Several were heard at Explornapo, should have tried harder to see one...

Elegant Crescentchest – Melanopareia elegans: Three were seen at Chaparri and a further five were sighted at Abra de Porculla. It was nice to see this stunner so well.

Maranon Crescentchest – M. mararonica: Two showed well, albeit rather briefly, in the side canyon about 2 km northwest of Chamaya.

Blackish (Leimebamba) Tapaculo – Scytalopus latrans intermedius: Many heard and one seen in forest scraps about 17 km above Leimebamba. The taxonomic status of this form seems unclear at present.

Rufous-vented Tapaculo – S. femoralis: Endemic to the east slope of the Peruvian Andes south of the Maranon. This is a common bird by voice in the forests below Abra Patricia. We eventually had good looks at a couple of birds at Abra Patricia Lodge.

White-crowned Tapaculo – S. atratus: Heard only, above Afluente.

Neblina Tapaculo – S. altirostris: Endemic to the east slope of the Peruvian Andes. A few were heard calling right at the treeline below Abra Barro Negro on the west side. We eventually obtained great looks at two birds.

Black-necked Red-Cotinga – Phoenicircus nigricollis: A flighty male was seen several times at Explornapo.

Cinereous Mourner – Laniocera hypopyrra: Heard at Muyuna.

Red-crested Cotinga – Ampelion rubrocristata: six gave nice views above Limon. Otherwise two were seen between Celendin and Cajamarca and two at Rio Chonta.

Peruvian Plantcutter – Phytotoma raimondii: Endemic to north coastal Peru and the arid northwest. Seen only at Bosque de Pomac, where at least 20 birds were logged – they seemed to be everywhere!

Green-and-black Fruiteater – Pipreola riefferii: Heard a few times below Abra Patricia but only two were seen, and briefly at that.

Scarlet-breasted Fruiteater – P. frontalis: One was seen briefly in the big flock at Km 401 above Afluente.

Scaled Fruiteater – Ampelioides tschudi: Two were seen in the fruiting trees above Afluente.

White-browed Purpletuft – Iodopleura isabellae: Two were seen in the canopy of riverside forest at Explornapo.

Olivaceous Piha – Lipaugus cryptolophus: One was seen a couple of times in the fruiting trees above Afluente.

Screaming Piha – L. vociferans: A few were heard at Explornapo and Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve but we made no serious attempt to actually see any.

Plum-throated Cotinga – Cotinga maynana: A lovely male was seen at Muyuna.

Spangled Cotinga – C. cayana: Six were seen from the canopy walkway at Explornapo with another nearer the lodge.

Bare-necked Fruitcrow – Gymnoderus foetidus: A lone male was seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Purple-throated Fruitcrow – Querula purpurata: Up to six were seen at Muyuna.

Red-ruffed Fruitcrow – Pyroderus scutatus: A superb male was seen a couple of times in the fruiting trees above Afluente.

Amazonian Umbrellabird – Cephalopterus ornatus: We had nice looks at three birds at Km 401 above Afluente.

Andean Cock-of-the-Rock – Rupicola peruviana: Up to six were seen in the fruiting trees above Afluente. Many others were heard in the general area.

Wire-tailed Manakin – Pipra filicauda: A male was seen briefly and a few others heard at Explornapo.

Golden-headed Manakin – P. erythrocephala: A lovely male was seen at Explornapo. Others were heard at a lek at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

White-crowned Manakin – P. pipra: Fairly common at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve, where up to four were seen.

Blue-crowned Manakin – P. coronata: Up to four were seen at Explornapo. Heard at Muyuna.

White-bearded Manakin – Manacus manacus: A male was seen briefly at Muyuna.

Western Striped Manakin – Machaeropterus regulus: Heard at Explornapo but, sadly, not seen.

Orange-crowned Manakin – Herterocercus aurantiivertex: A male was seen nicely at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Saffron-crested Tyrant-Manakin – Neopelma chrysocephalum: One showed briefly at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve, but unfortunately not for all.

Sulphur-bellied Tyrant-Manakin – N. sulphureiventer: At least three were calling from dense cover in the quebrada near Juan Guerra but we could only manage brief glimpses of one individual.

Dwarf Tyrant-Manakin – Tyranneutes stolzmanni: Heard at Explornapo and Muyuna.

Streak-necked Flycatcher – Mionectes striaticollis: Up to three were present in the big flocks above Afluente.

Olive-striped Flycatcher – M. olivaceus: A few were seen in the eastern foothills with a maximum of six at Aguas Verdes.

Ochre-bellied Flycatcher – M. oleagineus: Two at Explorenapo.

Inca Flycatcher – Leptopogon taczanowskii: Endemic to the east slope of the Peruvian Andes. One was seen briefly within a fast moving flock below Campamento Garcia.

Slaty-capped Flycatcher – L. superciliaris: Two were seen nicely in a large flock (containing mostly tyrants) at Aguas Verdes.

Flammulated Bamboo-Tyrant – Hemitriccus flamulatus: One was seen in dense scrub in the quebrada near Juan Guerra. No bamboo in sight.

White-eyed Tody-Tyrant – H. zosterops: One was eventually tracked down and seen well at Explornapo.

White-bellied Tody-Tyrant – H. greisipectus: One was heard at Muyuna.

Zimmer’s Tody-Tyrant – H. minimus: One was heard at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Stripe-necked Tody-Tyrant – H. striaticollis: One was seen in the quebrada near Juan Guerra and two more were cooperative in the savanna near Restaurante Yacumama, near Rioja.

Lulu’s Tody-Tyrant – Poecilotriccus luluae: Endemic to the east slope south of the Maranon. Fantastic close looks at several birds below Abra Patricia and along the muddy trail at Valle Hermoso. A flashy little sprite!

Rusty-fronted Tody-Flycatcher – P. latirostre: One was seen briefly near Juan Guerra.

Spotted Tody-Flycatcher – Todirostrum maculatum: Up to four were seen in river edge habitats at Iquitos, Explornapo and Muyuna.

Common Tody-Flycatcher – T. cinereum: Locally common with up to six at Bosque de Pomac, eight near Juan Guerra and six in the Utcubamba valley near Hacienda Chillo.

Yellow-browed Tody-Flycatcher – T. chrysocrotaphum: Great views from the canopy walkway at Explornapo.

Sooty-headed Tyrannulet – Phyllomyias griseiceps: Two were seen at the base of Morro de Calzada and another was seen in the scrub at the base of Quebrada Mishkiyaku, near Moyobamba.

Plumbeous-crowned Tyrannulet – P. plumbeiceps: Amazing views of two birds in the large tyrant flock at Aguas Verdes.

Black-capped Tyrannulet – P. nigrocapillus: One was seen briefly in the large flock about 17 Km above Leimebamba.

Mishana Tyrannulet – Zimmerius villarejoi: Endemic to white sands forest near Iquitos and in the Mayo Valley. Super looks at a close individual at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Slender-footed Tyrannulet – Z. gracilipes: Gripping views from the canopy walkway at Explornapo. About the only way one can get close views of this canopy dwelling tyrant.

Golden-faced Tyrannulet – Z. chrysops: Common between Abra Patricia and Aguas Verdes, where up to 15 daily. The taxonomy of this form has yet to be resolved.

Southern Beardless-Tyrannulet – Camptostoma obsoletum: Birds of the form sclateri were commonly seen in the arid northwest and in the dry Maranon Valley, where a maximum of 12 were seen at Chaparri. One individual, presumably of the form olivaceum, was noted at the quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Tumbes Tyrannulet – P. tumbezana: Up to four were seen at Bosque de Pomac, Abra de Porculla and along the seminario road near Jaen.

Gray-and-white Tyrannulet – Pseudelaenia leucospodia: Very common at Bosque de Pomac, where at least 20 were seen. Otherwise four were seen at Abra de Porculla.

Yellow Tyrannulet – Capsiempis flaveola: Four were seen in scrub on the edge of the savanna near Restaurante Yacumama, near Rioja.

Amazonian Scrub-Flycatcher – Sublegatus obscurior: One was seen in the savanna near Restaurante Yacumama, near Rioja.

Yellow-crowned Tyrannulet – Tyrannulus elatus: Commonly heard at Explornapo, Muyuna and Allpahuayo/Mishana, though only a couple of individuals were actually seen.

Forest Elaenia – Myiopagis gaimardii: Two were seen at Muyuna.

Gray Elaenia – Myiopagis caniceps: One showed well in the canopy at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Yellow-crowned Elaenia – M. flavivertex: Two were seen well in varzea at Muyuna.

Yellow-bellied Elaenia – Elaenia flavogaster: Single birds were seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku and in the Utcubamba Valley near Hacienda Chillo.

Large Elaenia – E. spectabilis: One was seen briefly, but well, in scrub near Juan Guerra.

White-crested Elaenia – E. albiceps: Up to six were seen below Abra Patricia. Also, two were seen above Leimebamba and two above Limon.

Small-billed Elaenia – E. parvirostris: A worn bird, presumably a tardy austral migrant, was seen several times from the canopy walkway at Explornapo.

Mottle-backed Elaenia – E. gigas: Two were seen in the white sand forest near Aguas Verdes.

Brownish Elaenia – E. pelzelni: One was seen at Muyuna.

Sierran Elaenia – E. pallatangae: Up to four were seen below Abra Patricia.

White-throated Tyrannulet – Mecocerculus leucophrys: Two were seen below Abra Barro Negro.

White-banded Tyrannulet – M. stictopterus: One was seen below Abra Patricia and up to four logged in forest fragments 17 Km above Leimebamba.

Torrent Tyrannulet – Serpophaga cinerea: One was seen below Abra Patricia. Common in the Utcubamba Valley, where at least 12 were logged. Otherwise, up four were seen along the Rio Chonta.

Black-crested Tit-Tyrant – Anairetes nigrocristatus: One or two were seen below Abra Barro Negro and between Limon and Celendin.

Pied-crested Tit-Tyrant – A. reguloides: Two were seen nicely along the lower Santa Eulalia road.

Yellow-billed Tit-Tyrant – A. flavirostris: At least three were seen well along the lower Santa Eulalia road.

Tufted Tit-Tyrant – A. parulus: One or two were seen below Abra Barro Negro and between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Tawny-crowned Pygmy-Tyrant – Euscarthmus meloryphus: Common in the arid northwest with a maximum of eight at Bosque de Pomac.

Marble-faced Bristle-Tyrant – Phylloscartes ophthalmicus: One was seen near Aguas Verdes.

Spectacled Bristle-Tyrant – P. orbitalis: One was seen briefly in a large mixed flock above Afluente.

Variegated Bristle-Tyrant – P. poecilotis: Single birds were seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku and at Aguas Verdes.

Ecuadorian Tyrannulet – P. gualaquizae: Nice looks at up to four birds in the big flock at Km 401 above Afluente.

Mottle-cheeked Tyrannulet – P. ventralis: A family party of four was seen a couple of times above Campamento Garcia. Otherwise up to two were noted in the flocks above Afluente.

Short-tailed Pygmy-Tyrant – Myiornis ecaudatus: One was seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Scale-crested Pygmy-Tyrant – Lophotriccus pileatus: Nice looks at one at Km 401 above Afluente.

Olivaceous Flatbill – Rhynchocyclus olivaceus: Two singles were recorded at Muyuna.

Fulvous-breasted Flatbill – R. fulvipectus: One was seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Yellow-olive Flycatcher – Tolmomyias sulphurescens: One was seen at Restaurante Yacumama, near Rioja.

Zimmer’s Flycatcher – T. assimilis: Great looks at one from the canopy walkway at Explornapo, with another seen at Allpahuayo/Miahana reserve.

Gray-crowned Flycatcher – Tolmomyias poliocephalus: One was seen at Muyuna.

Yellow-breasted Flycatcher – T. flaviventris: Two were seen at Explornapo, with another at Quebrada Mishkiyaku

Orange-eyed Flycatcher – T. traylori: One was seen briefly in riverside forest near Explornapo.

Ornate Flycatcher – Myiotriccus ornatus: Nice looks at two birds above Campamento Garcia.

Bran-colored Flycatcher – Myiophobus fasciatus: One was seen at Bosque de Pomac and two were logged in the Utcubamba Valley near Hacienda Chillo.

Ruddy-tailed Flycatcher – Myiobius erythrurus: Single birds were seen at Muyuna and Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Black-tailed Flycatcher – Myiobius atricaudus: Great views of two birds in the quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Cinnamon Flycatcher – Pyrrhomyias cinnamomea: Up to four were noted below Abra Patricia.

Cliff Flycatcher – Hirundinea ferruginea: Just a couple, at Campamento Garcia.

Fuscous Flycatcher – Cnemotriccus fuscatus: One was seen on an early successional river island near Explornapo and two in similar habitat near Iquitos. A very vocal individual of the undescribed form sometimes known as the “Varillal Fuscous Flycatcher” remained frustratingly elusive in the varillal of Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve. Maybe next time…though I think I said that last time!

Gray-breasted Flycatcher – Lathotriccus griseipectus: One gave nice views for some of us at Chaparri.

Olive-sided Flycatcher – Contopus borealis: One was seen with the pewee flock at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Smoke-colored Pewee – C. fumigatus: Very scarce with just single birds at Rio Chido and Abra Patricia.

Western Wood-Pewee – C. sordidulus: Singles were logged (by voice) at Aguas Verdes and above Leimebamba.

Eastern Wood-Pewee – C. virens: One or two were recorded at scattered localities in Amazonia. Otherwise a large concentration of 15 were noted at Quebrada Mishkijaku.

Tumbes Pewee – C. punensis: Six were seen along the seminario road near Jaen.

Alder Flycatcher – Empidonax alnorum: Three, including one in full song, were seen at forest edge near Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Black Phoebe – Sayornis nigricans: Six were seen between Abra Patricia and Campamento Garcia and four were logged in the Utcubamba Valley near Hacienda Chillo.

Vermilion Flycatcher – Pyrocephalus rubinus: Two were seen on river islands near Iquitos. Common around Lima and in the arid northwest, where a maximum of 10 was noted at Bosque de Pomac. Common also in the dry Maranon Valley, where up to 10 were seen at several localities.

Jelski’s Chat-Tyrant – Ochthoeca jelskii: We were treated to brilliant views of a very cooperative bird in roadside scrub between Limon and Celendin.

Rufous-breasted Chat-Tyrant – O. rufipectoralis: Up to six were seen below Abra Barro Negro and around Celendin.

Brown-backed Chat-Tyrant – O. fumicolor: Up to four were seen below Abra Barro Negro, between Limon and Celendin and between Celendin and Cajamarca.

D’Orbigny’s Chat-Tyrant – O. oenanthoides: Two in the polylepis along the upper Santa Eulalia road.

White-browed Chat-Tyrant – O. leucophrys: Up to four were seen in the highlands on either side of the Maranon. Two were seen along the Santa Eulalia road.

Tumbes Tyrant – Tumbezia salvini: Endemic to the arid northwest. Two gave great views at Chaparri.

Drab Water-Tyrant – Ochthornis littoralis: two were noted near Explornapo. Otherwise one at Muyuna and one in the quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Streak-throated Bush-Tyrant – Myiotheretes striaticollis: Two were seen above Leimebamba and three between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Smoky Bush-Tyrant – M. fumigatus: One was seen in the big flock about 17 Km above Leimebamba.

Black-billed Shrike-Tyrant – Agriornis montana: Six were logged between Celendin and Cajamarca and four were seen at Rio Chonta.

White-tailed Shrike-Tyrant – A. andicola: Nice looks at two near Cruz Conga, with the preceding species for comparison.

Rufous-webbed Tyrant – Polioxolmis rufipennis: Great looks at six birds near Cruz Conga.

Little Ground-Tyrant – Muscisaxicola fluviatalis: One was noted on an early successional river island near Iquitos.

Taczanowski’s Ground-Tyrant – M. griseus: One was seen near Marcapomacocha.

Cinereous Ground-Tyrant – M. cinerea: Just one near Marcapomacocha.

White-fronted Ground-Tyrant – M. albifrons: Two were noted near Marcapomacocha.

Short-tailed Field-Tyrant – Muscigralla brevicauda: Three were seen in cactus-dominated scrub near Bagua Chica.

Rufous-tailed Tyrant – Knipolegus poecilurus: Four were noted above Campamento Garcia.

Riverside Tyrant – K. orenocensis: Two were seen on an early successional river island near Iquitos.

White-winged Black-Tyrant – K. aterrimus: Two were seen in roadside scrub above Limon.

White-headed Marsh-Tyrant – Arundinicola leucocephala: Two were seen en route to Explornapo, and another two were noted near Muyuna.

Long-tailed Tyrant – Colonia colonus: Up to five were seen between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

Cinnamon Attila – Attila cinnamomeus: Heard in varzea at Muyuna.

Citron-bellied Attila – A. citriniventris: Heard a few times at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve, just one was seen.

Bright-rumped Attila – A. spadiceus: One seen and a few heard at Explornapo, mostly from the canopy walkway.

Grayish Mourner – Rhipterna simplex: Two singles were seen at Muyuna.

Sirystes – Sirystes sibilator: One was seen in the grounds of Restaurante Yacumama, near Rioja.

Rufous Flycatcher – Myiarchus semirufus: Endemic to northern coastal and arid northwest Peru. One was a last minute save at Bosque de Pomac, but it showed very well!

Dusky-capped Flycatcher – M. tuberculifer: One or two were seen above Afluente and at 17 Km above Leimebamba.

Short-crested Flycatcher – M. ferox: Up to four were seen at various sites in Amazonia.

Sooty-crowned Flycatcher – M. phaeocephalus: Three were seen along the Seminario road near Jaen.

Brown-crested Flycatcher – M. tyrannulus: Three were seen in arid scrub near Bagua Chica.

Tropical Kingbird – T. melancholicus: Commonly seen throughout the lowlands and foothills.

Eastern Kingbird – T. tyrannus: One was seen in the unusual location of the Seminario road near Jaen.

Crowned Slaty-Flycatcher – Griseotyrannus aurantioatrocristatus: Up to four were seen at Explornapo, mostly from the canopy walkway.

Sulphury Flycatcher – Tyrannopsis sulphurea: One was seen in a moriche palm grove near Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Boat-billed Flycatcher – Megarhynchus pitangua: Recorded in small numbers in the eastern lowlands and foothills.

Baird’s Flycatcher – Myiodynastes bairdii: Four were noted at Bosque de Pomac, six at Chaparri and three at Abra de Porculla.

Streaked Flycatcher – M. maculatus: Singles were seen at Explornapo, Muyuna and Juan Guerra.

Social Flycatcher – Myiozetetes similis: Up to 10 were seen in the eastern lowlands with smaller numbers in the foothills.

Gray-capped Flycatcher – M. granadensis: Two each were seen at Explornapo and Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Dusky-chested Flycatcher – M. luteiventris: At least 12 were seen from the canopy walkway at Explornapo.

Piratic Flycatcher – Legatus leucophaius: At least 10 were seen from the canopy walkway at Explornapo, four at Muyuna, and singles at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve and Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Lesser Kiskadee – Philohydor lictor: Up to 10 were noted at Muyuna.

Great Kiskadee – Pitangus sulphuratus: Common in the eastern lowlands and foothills.

Varzea Schiffornis – Schiffornis major: Three were seen at Muyuna, where many others were heard in varzea forest.

Thrush-like Schiffornis – S. turdinus: Heard at Explornapo.

Chestnut-crowned Becard – Pachyramphus castaneus: One was seen at Muyuna, and another was at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

White-winged Becard – P. polychopterus: Two at Explornapo, one at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve, one at Juan Guerra and two at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Black-and-white Becard – P. albogriseus: Two were noted in a mixed flock below Campamento Garcia.

Pink-throated Becard – P. minor: One was seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Crested Becard – P. validus: A male was seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku. At the time of writing I’m not sure if this species has been recorded at this site before.

Masked Tityra – Tityra semifasciata: One was seen at Muyuna.

White-collared Jay – Cyanolyca viridicyana: Up to six were seen below Abra Patricia and two 17 Km above Leimebamba.

White-tailed Jay – C. mystacalis: Up to five were seen at Bosque de Pomac and Chaparri.

Green (Inca) Jay – C. yncas: Seen only in the Abra Patricia area, where up to four were logged.

Rufous-browed Peppershrike – Cyclarhis gujanensis: Heard at Muyuna. Two were seen at Bosque de Pomac, two at Jaen, and then heard many times on the east slope below Abra Patricia down to Juan Guerra. Otherwise one was seen above Leimebamba.

Red-eyed Vireo – Vireo olivaceus: Up to four were noted at Explornapo. Single birds were seen at Chaparri and Jaen. More numerous on the east slope, where up to 10 were seen, mostly around Afluente.

Yellow-green Vireo – V. flavoviridis: Four were seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Brown-capped Vireo – V. leucophrys: One or two were seen on several occasions between Campamento Garcia and Afluente.

Ashy-headed Greenlet – Hylophilus pectoralis: Two singles were seen in the quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Dusky-capped Greenlet – H. hypoxanthus: One was seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Olivaceous Greenlet – H. olivaceus: One was seen in a fast moving flock at Km 401 above Afluente.

Tawny-crowned Greenlet – H. ochraceiceps: One showed well at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

White-capped Dipper – Cinclus leucocephalus: Two were seen well at Rio Chido and another two were watched at some distance at Aguas Verdes.

Andean Solitaire – Myadestes ralloides: The lovely song was heard with some frequency around Abra Patricia. A few were seen.

White-eared Solitaire – Entomodestes leucotis: One seen and a few others heard, mostly below Campamento Garcia.

Swainson’s Thrush – Catharus ustulatus: One at Muyuna was the only individual noted in Amazonia. Rather common in the eastern foothills with a maximum of at least 50 in fruiting trees at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Chiguanco Thrush – Turdus chiguanco: A few were seen along the Santa Eulalia road. This species is quite common in the dry valleys of the Maranon, where the maximun count was 30 between Limon and Celendin.

Great Thrush – T. fuscater: Common in the more humid highlands.

Andean Slaty-Thrush – T. nigriceps: Four were seen at Abra de Porculla and we had nice looks at two above Afluente.

Plumbeous-backed Thrush – T. reevei: Found to be rather common at Abra de Porculla, where at least 40 were logged. We saw none here in February last year!

Maranon Thrush – T. maranonicus: One was seen briefly along the seminario road near Jaen. Otherwise, found to be fairly common in the Utcubamba Valley (15) and around Balsas.

Pale-breasted Thrush – T. leucomelas: Up to four were noted in the quebrada near Juan Guerra.

Black-billed Thrush – T. ignobilis: Two were seen at Iquitos airport. Otherwise a few were seen or heard in the eastern lowlands and foothills.

Lawrence’s Thrush – T. lawrencii: One was seen and heard at Explornapo.

Hauxwell’s Thrush – T. hauxwelli: Up to two were noted at Muyuna. We heard and saw two birds of the undescribed form in the white sand forest scraps near Aguas Verdes. This may turn out to be a new species of turdus thrush.

White-necked Thrush – T. albicollis: One was seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Long-tailed Mockingbird – Mimus longicaudatus: This species is abundant in the arid northwest. Smaller numbers were seen in the Maranon Valley with up to 30 near Jaen and 20 at Balsas.

Black-capped Donacobius – Donacobius atricapilus: Rather common in the wetlands around Muyuna, where up to 20 were seen daily.

Thrush-like Wren – Campylorhynchus turdinus: Up to three were seen nicely at Muyuna.

Fasciated Wren – C. fasciatus: This noisy wren is common in the arid northwest, particularly so at Bosque de Pomac, where we logged at least 25.

Gray-mantled Wren – Odontorchilus branickii: One was seen very well with a fast moving flock above Afluente.

Sharpe’s Wren – Cinnycerthia olivascens: Four were seen in a fast moving flock at Abra Patricia Lodge.

Coraya Wren – T. coraya: Commonly heard, with a few seen, in Amazonia and the eastern foothills.

Speckle-breasted Wren – T. sclateri: The form paucimaculatus was heard, and one seen, at Abra de Porculla. Birds of the form sclateri, sometimes known as the “Maranon Wren” were heard and seen well along the Seminario road near Jaen.

Buff-breasted Wren – T. leucotis: Commonly heard in riverine forest in Amazonia and the eastern foothills. This species was particularly numerous at Muyuna, where up to six were seen daily.

Superciliated Wren – T. superciliaris: Common in the arid northwest, where up to 20 were seen at Bosque de Pomac and 10 at Chaparri.

Southern House Wren – Troglodytes aedon: Scarce in Amazonia, were one was heard in Iquitos and another seen at Muyuna. Otherwise we encountered this common species frequently throughout the north. A few were noted along the Santa Eulalia road.

Mountain Wren – T. solstitialis: Just one was seen, below Abra Patricia.

Gray-breasted Wood-Wren – Henicorhina leucophrys: Commonly heard, and a few seen between Abra Patricia and Campamento Garcia.

(Bar-winged Wood-Wren – H. leucoptera: We almost certainly heard this species around Campamento Garcia but since we didn’t actually see any there is scope for confusion with the preceding species).

Southern Nightingale-Wren – Microcerculus marginatus: In Amazonia, heard at Muyuna and Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve. Otherwise a few were heard between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

Chestnut-breasted Wren – Cyphorhinus thoracicus: One was heard below Campamento Garcia but was just out of reach to actually see – as usual.

Musician Wren – C. aradus: Heard at Explornapo. Two were heard at Muyuna.

Long-billed Gnatwren – Ramphocaenus melanurus: Nice looks at one in a flock at Muyuna.

Tropical Gnatcatcher – Polioptila plumbea: The form bilineata, sometimes called the “White-faced Gnatcatcher” is very common in the arid northwest. We logged at least 20 at Bosque de Pomac and 10 at Chaparri. The form maior, sometimes known as the “Maranon Gnatcatcher”, is common in the dry intermountain valleys of the Maranon. Highest counts were 10 around Jaen and six at San Marcos.

Iquitos Gnatcatcher – P. clementsi: Endemic to northern Amazonian Peru. One was heard briefly at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

White-winged Swallow – Tachycineta albiventer: Commonly seen along rivers in Amazonia.

Tumbes Swallow – T. stolzmanni: Two were seen near Bosque de Pomac.

Brown-chested Martin – Phaeoprogne tapera: Scarce, with up to six at Muyuna and one at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Gray-breasted Martin – Progne chalybea: About 40 in Iquitos. Otherwise just one or two were noted at scattered sites in Amazonia, the arid northwest and eastern foothills.

Southern Martin – P. modesta: At least 200+ were seen in Iquitos.

Brown-bellied Swallow – Notiochelidon murina: 15 were seen at nest holes below Abra Barro Negro. Otherwise we logged 20 between Celendin and Cajamarca and 25 at Rio Chonta.

Blue-and-white Swallow – N. cyanoleuca: Commonly seen in the highlands, the arid northwest and eastern foothills.

White-banded Swallow – Atticora fasciata: 12 were seen at Explornapo and another was noted on the Rio Mayo near Juan Guerra.

Southern Rough-winged Swallow – Stelgidopteryx ruficollis: Small numbers were noted at scattered localities throughout the lowlands and foothills.

Sand Martin – Riparia riparia: Up to 200 were seen at Muyuna and near Iquitos. Otherwise, we noted one at Bosque de Pomac and four at Tinajones reservoir, near Chaparri.

Barn Swallow – Hurundo rustica: Small numbers were seen at scattered sites in the east. Larger accumulations were noted in the west, with up to 500 at Lomas de Lachay, 300 at Bosque de Pomac and 100 at Tinajones reservoir.

Cliff Swallow – H. pyrrhonota: Three were seen with the swallow flock at Tinajones reservoir. Otherwise a single bird was seen over rice fields near Bagua Chica.

House Sparrow – Passer domestucus: Commonly seen around habitations.

Paramo Pipit – Anthus bogotensis: Six gave nice looks between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Yellowish Pipit – A. lutescens: At least 10 were seen along the approach road to Lomas de Lachay, most of which were in full song flight mode. Otherwise, we noted six on the beach near Puerto Eten.

Hooded Siskin – C. magellanica: Very common at Abra de Porculla, where we saw at least 100+. Otherwise, this species was fairly common in the highlands with a maximum of 20 between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Black Siskin – C. atrata: Three were seen on the upper Santa Eulalia road.

Lesser Goldfinch – C. psaltria: Just two, at Abra de Porculla.

Tropical Parula – Parula pitiayumi: Six were seen at Chaparri. Otherwise, just two singles at Afluente and Balsas.

Blackburnian Warbler – Dendroica fusca: Just four birds were seen with the large flocks in the Afluente area.

Blackpoll Warbler – D. striata: One was seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Masked Yellowthroat – Geothlypis aequinoctialis: Four birds of the form peruviana were seen at San Marcos.

Canada Warbler – Wilsonia canadensis: Scattered records of up to four on the east slope below Campamento Garcia.

Slate-throated Whitestart – Myioborus miniatus: Four were noted at Abra de Porculla. Otherwise, this species was pretty common in the big flocks on the east slope, especially around Afluente.

Spectacled Whitestart – M. melanocephalus: Up to 10 were noted in the temperate forests and scrub at Pomacochas, Abra Patricia and above Leimebamba.

Gray-and-gold Warbler – Basileuterus fraseri: Four were seen below Abra de Porculla.

Citrine Warbler – B. luteoviridis: Two were seen below Abra Patricia and two were logged 17 Km above Leimebamba.

Black-crested Warbler – B. nigrocristatus: Up to four were recorded in the highlands of the Maranon Valley and at Rio Chonta.

Russet-crowned Warbler – B. coronatus: Small numbers were seen or heard around Abra Patricia.

Three-banded Warbler – B. trifasciatus: Very common at Abra de Porculla, where we noted at least 25. We saw none here in February last year!

Three-striped Warbler – B. tristriatus: Up to four were seen in the flocks below Campamento Garcia.

Buff-rumped Warbler – B. fulvicauda: Great looks of two birds at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Rufous-collared Sparrow – Zonotrichia capensis: Common and widespread in the highlands, the arid northwest and locally on the east slope.

Yellow-browed Sparrow – Ammodramus aurifrons: Up to three were seen or heard at scattered locations in Amazonia and in the eastern foothills.

Tumbes Sparrow – Aimophila stolzmanni: Seen only at Chaparri, where at least 10 were logged.

Black-capped Sparrow – Arremon abeillei: One was seen briefly below Abra de Porculla.

Rufous-naped Brush-Finch – Atlapetes rufinucha: Birds of the form latinuchus (on the east slope of the Andes) were seen in small numbers (up to eight) below Abra Patricia and above Leimebamba. Up to six birds of the pale-crowned form baroni were seen near Celendin and at Rio Chonta.

Bay-crowned Brush-Finch – A. seebohmi: Eight were seen at Abra de Porculla.

Rusty-bellied Brush-Finch – A. nationi: Endemic to the west slope of the central Peruvian Andes. At least 10 of this handsome brush-finch were seen along the Santa Eulalia road.

White-winged Brush-Finch – A. leucopterus: At least 15 of the form dresseri were seen at Abra de Porculla.

White-headed Brush-Finch – A. albiceps: Eight were seen very well at Chaparri.

Red-capped Cardinal – Paroaria gularis: Six were seen at Explornapo. Otherwise fairly common around Muyuna, where up to four were seen daily.

Bananaquit – Coerba flaveola: Common only in the arid northwest, were a maximum of 20 was seen at Chaparri. Elsewhere, up to six were seen at various localities on the east slope.

Bicolored Conebill – Conirostrum bicolor: One was seen on an early successional river island near Iquitos.

Cinereous Conebill – C. cinereum: In the arid northwest, two were seen at Bosque de Pomac and at Abra de Porculla. More numerous in the highlands on both sides of the Maranon Valley, where up to 10 were seen daily. Two were seen in polylepis along the upper Santa Eulalia road.

Blue-backed Conebill – C. sitticolor: Just four, below Abra Barro Negro.

Capped Conebill – C. albifrons: Only one, a female at Abra Patricia Lodge.

Black-faced Tanager – Schistoclamys melanopis: Two were seen in scrub at the base of Morro de Calzada.

Magpie Tanager – Cissopis leveriana: Up to four were seen between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

Grass-green Tanager – Chlorornis riefferii: One or two were seen a few times around Abra Patricia.

White-capped Tanager – Sericossypha albocristata: A flock was heard rather distantly from Abra Patricia Lodge. Surely my day with come…

Common Bush-Tanager – Chlorospingus opthalmicus: Up to six were seen in the big flocks between Campamento Garcia and Afluente.

Black-capped Hemispingus – Hemispingus atropileus: Two showed well in a big flock 17 Km above Leimebamba.

Superciliaried Hemispingus – H. superciliaris: Up to 10 of the white-bellied form leucogastrus were seen in the flocks 17 Km above Leimebamba.

Oleaginous Hemispingus – H. frontalis: Two were seen near the fruiting trees above Afluente.

Black-eared Hemispingus – H. melanotis: One was seen below Campamento Garcia.

Drab Hemispingus – H. xanthophthalmus: two were seen in a mixed flock at Abra Patricia. Otherwise, up to four were in the flocks 17 Km above Leimebamba.

Orange-headed Tanager – Thlypopsis sordida: Three were seen at the boat dock in Iquitos and another on a river island near Iquitos.

Buff-bellied Tanager – T. inornata: Three gave nice views along the Seminario road near Jaen. In addition we noted four in the Utcubamba Valley near Hacienda Chillo.

Guira Tanager – Hemithraupis guira: Four were seen at Muyuna.

Hooded Tanager – Nemosia pileata: Only two were seen, on a mature river island near Explornapo.

Fulvous Shrike-Tanager – Lanio fulvus: Nice looks at one in a flock at Explornapo.

Rufous-crested Tanager – Creurgops verticalis: Up to two were seen below Abra Patricia.

Flame-crested Tanager – Tachyphonus cristatus: A nice male was seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

White-shouldered Tanager – Tachyphonus luctuosus: A male was seen briefly above Afluente.

White-lined Tanager – T. rufus: Common only along the seminario road near Jaen, where we logged eight birds. Otherwise just one or two were seen in the eastern foothills.

Red-shouldered Tanager – T. phoenicius: Two were seen in scrub at the base of Morro de Calzada.

Hepatic Tanager – Piranga flava: Scattered records of up to three birds were seen in the arid northwest and the dry intermountain valleys of the Maranon.

Summer Tanager – P. rubra: Up to four were noted on several occasions in mixed flocks between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

Scarlet Tanager – P. olivacea: Up to six were seen at the fruiting tree below the tunnel on the Tarapoto-Yurimaguas road, and at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Vermilion Tanager – Calochaetes coccineus: Three were seen in the fruiting trees above Afluente – stunning!

Masked Crimson Tanager – Ramphocelus nigrogularis: Common along rivers in Amazonia. The maximum count was 30 at Explornapo.

Huallaga Tanager – R. melanogaster: Endemic to the Mayo and upper Huallaga valleys. Up to six were seen, mosty within flocks, between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

Silver-beaked Tanager – R. carbo: Commonly seen in Amazonia and the eastern foothills.

Blue-gray Tanager – Thraupis episcopus: Common in Amazonia and the eastern foothills. This species seemed especially numerous at Quebrada Mishkiyaku, where we saw at least 75, mostly in fruiting trees. Smaller numbers, up to six, were noted in the arid northwest.

Palm Tanager – T. palmarum: Small numbers were seen at scattered localities in Amazonia and the eastern foothills. As with the preceding species, many were using the fruiting trees at Quebrada Mishkiyaku, where at least 50 were logged.

Blue-capped Tanager – T. cyanocephala: Up to four were seen at Pomacochas, below Abra Patricia and above Leimebamba.

Blue-and-yellow Tanager – T. bonariensis: Six were seen in the Utcubamba Valley, one between Celendin and Cajamarca and up to eight at Rio Chonta.

Hooded Mountain-Tanager – Buthraupis montana: Up to two were seen at Abra Patricia and in the forest fragments 17 Km above Leimebamba.

Scarlet-bellied Mountain-Tanager – Anisognathus igniventris: One was seen near Pomacochas. Otherwise, only noted above Leimebamba, where up to four were observed.

Blue-winged Mountain-Tanager – A. somptuosus: Two singles were logged in the flocks below Campamento Garcia.

Yellow-throated Tanager – Iridisornis analis: One or two birds were seen on three dates in the flocks below Campamento Garcia.

Yellow-scarfed Tanager – I. reinhardti: Endemic to the east slope of the Peruvian Andes. Two were seen, albeit rather distantly, in a flock just below Abra Patricia Lodge.

Fawn-breasted Tanager – Pipraeidea melanonota: One was seen in the Utcubamba Valley near Hacienda Chillo. Otherwise two were noted between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Purple-throated Euphonia – Euphonia chlorotica: Up to four were seen in the Maranon Valley around Jaen and Balsas. More numerous in the eastern foothills, where up to 10 were noted near Juan Guerra.

Thick-billed Euphonia – E. laniirostris: Up to six were logged at Muyuna, Abra de Porculla and Juan Guerra.

Golden-rumped Euphonia – E. cyanocephala: Just one, a nice male in the Utcubamba Valley near Hacienda Chillo.

Bronze-green Euphonia – E. mesochrysa: Up to four were seen within the large tanager flocks between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

White-vented Euphonia – E. minuta: A single male was seen at Explornapo.

Orange-bellied Euphonia – E. xanthogaster: Up to 10 noted at scattered localities in Amazonia and the eastern foothills.

Rufous-bellied Euphonia – E. rufiventris: Six were seen from the canopy walkway at Explornapo.

Blue-naped Chlorophonia – Chlorophonia cyanea: Two were seen in the fruiting trees above Afluente and two were seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Orange-eared Tanager – Chlorochrysa calliparaea: Three singles were noted in the flocks above Afluente.

Turquoise Tanager – Tangara mexicana: Found to be very scarce, with just one or two noted at scattered sites in Amazonia. Elsewhere, four were seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Paradise Tanager – T. chilensis: Small numbers were frequently noted in Amazonia, with a maximum of six at Allpahuyao/Mishana reserve. More numerous in the eastern foothills, where a maximum of 10 was logged above Afluente.

Green-and-gold Tanager – T. schrankii: Up to 10 were seen at Explornapo. Otherwise, up to eight were seen in the tanager flocks between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

Golden Tanager – T. arthus: Common on the east slope, where up to 12 were logged, mostly between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

Saffron-crowned Tanager – T. xanthocephala: The commonest tangara on the east slope, where up to 20 were noted daily, mostly between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

Golden-eared Tanager – T. chrysotis: Five birds were noted on four dates in the flocks between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

Flame-faced Tanager – T. parzudakii: Up to 10 were seen almost daily on the east slope, mostly between Abra Patricia and Campamento Garcia.

Yellow-bellied Tanager – T. xanthogastra: Small numbers, up to six, were seen almost daily on the east slope, mostly between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

Spotted Tanager – T. punctata: Up to four were noted on the east slope, mostly around Afluente.

Dotted Tanager – T. varia: Two birds were studied at close range in the busy fruiting tree about four Km below the tunnel on the Tarapoto/Yurimaguas road.

Bay-headed Tanager – T. gyrola: Very scarce, with just one or two birds noted on a few dates. Most were in the big tanager flocks around Afluente.

Burnished-buff Tanager – T. cayana: Two were seen in open pasture near the base of Morro de Calzada. Single birds were also noted at Restaurante Yacumama and in the white sand scrub near Aguas Verdes.

Golden-naped Tanager – T. ruficervix: Two singles were logged in the big Afluente bird flocks.

Metallic-green Tanager – T. labradorides: Two singles were seen in the flocks above Afluente.

Blue-necked Tanager – T. cyanicollis: One was seen at Muyuna. Otherwise, a common component of the big tanager flocks on the lower east slope. Up to 10 were seen daily, mostly above Afluente.

Masked Tanager – T. nigrocincta: Up to 10 were seen in the tanager flocks between Aguas Verdes and Afluente.

Beryl-spangled Tanager – T. nigroviridis: Up to four were seen between Abra Patricia and Campamento Garcia.

Blue-and-black Tanager – T. vassorii: Up to four were seen below Abra Patricia.

Silver-backed Tanager – T. viridicollis: We had several nice encounters with this handsome tangara. Up to six were seen on the east slope, mostly between Abra Patricia and Campamento Garcia. In addition we noted two in the Utcubamba Valley near Hacienda Chillo.

Straw-backed Tanager – T. argyrofenges: A male was seen briefly (by some) in a fast moving flock below Campamento Garcia.

Opal-crowned Tanager – T. callophrys: Just one was seen, at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Black-faced Dacnis – Dacnis lineata: One or two were seen on several dates at Muyuna and in the eastern foothills.

Yellow-bellied Dacnis – D. flaviventer: Only one, at Muyuna.

Blue Dacnis – D. cayana: Very scarce. Just one was seen at Explornapo, six along the Tarapoto-Yurimaguas road and two at Aguas Verdes.

Green Honeycreeper – Chlorophanes spiza: Small numbers (up to six) were seen in Amazonia. Elsewhere, one or two were seen with the flocks between Aguas Verdes and Afluente on several dates.

Short-billed Honeycreeper – Cyanerpes nitidus: Seen only around the fruiting tree below the tunnel on the Tarapoto-Yurimaguas road, where at least ten provided great looks.

Purple Honeycreeper – C. caeruleus: Up to four were seen at Explornapo and Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve. Otherwise a few were seen in the eastern foothills, with a maximum of six at Quebrada Mishkiyaki.

Red-legged Honeycreeper – C. cyaneus: Four were logged at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve and two were seen at Aguas Verdes.

Swallow-Tanager – Tersia viridis: Common only at Explornapo, where at least 20 were seen from the canopy walkway. Elsewhere, very few were seen, apart from eight at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Red-crested Finch – Coryphospingus cucullatus: Seen only along the seminario road near Jaen, where we had nice looks at six birds.

Peruvian Sierra-Finch – Phrygilus punensis: Up to eight were noted in the Maranon highlands, mostly between Celendin and Cajamarca. At least 25 were seen along the upper Santa Eulalia road.

Mourning Sierra-Finch – P. fruticeti: One was noted at Rio Chonta. Otherwise, very common along the Santa Eulalia road where at least 300 were seen.

Plumbeous Sierra-Finch – P. unicolor: Up to thrtee were seen in the highlands of the Maranon Valley. Also, at least 10 were noted at Marcapomacocha.

Ash-breasted Sierra-Finch – P. plebejus: One was seen near Pomacochas. Otherwise a few were seen in the highlands of the Maranon Valley and 20 were logged along the Santa Eulalia road.

Band-tailed Sierra-Finch – P. alaudinus: Two showed well along the approach road to Lomas de Lachay. One was seen nicely along the Santa Eulalia road.

White-winged Diuca-Finch – Diuca speculifera: Four were seen at Marcapomacocha.

Cinereous Finch – Piezorhina cinerea: Endemic to the arid northwest. Five at Bosque de Pomac was all we could manage.

Great Inca-Finch – Incaspiza pulchra: Endemic to the west slope of the central Peruvian Andes. We had nice looks at three birds in the dry scrub along the lower part of the Santa Eulalia road.

Gray-winged Inca-Finch – I. ortizi: Endemic to the west bank of the central Maranon Valley. Great looks at a singing male in the roadside scrub above Limon.

Buff-bridled Inca-Finch – I. laeta: Endemic to the central and upper Maranon Valley. Great looks at up to four birds on either side of the Maranon valley near Balsas. Otherwise, six were seen at San Marcos.

Little Inca-Finch – I. watkinsi: Endemic to the lower Maranon Valley. One was seen briefly in the side canyon two Km northeast of Chamaya. Also, one or two were seen, equally briefly, in cactus-dominated scrub near Bagua Chica.

Rufous-breasted Warbling-Finch – Poospiza rubecula: Endemic to the west slope of the Peruvian Andes where it is decidedly local and uncommon at best. We were fortunate to see four individuals at a known stakeout along the Santa Eulalia road, though they were rather flighty and hard to see well. This included an immature bird in a plumage rarely observed. A trip highlight, as they say.

Collared Warbling-Finch – P. hispaniolensis: Just one was noted at Bosque de Pomac. More numerous at Chaparri, where 10 were logged.

Bright-rumped Yellow-Finch – Sicalis uropygialis: At least 100+ were seen near Marcapomacocha.

Greenish Yellow-Finch – S. olivascens: 50+ were observered along the Santa Eulalia road.

Saffron Finch – S. flaveola: Common in the arid northwest, with a maximum of 20 around Jaen.

Grassland Yellow-Finch – S. luteola: Six were seen near Pomacochas.

Raimondi’s Yellow-Finch – S. raimondii: Endemic to the lower west slope of the Peruvian Andes. Five gave nice looks at Lomas de Lachay.

Sulphur-throated Finch – S. taczanowskii: Seen only at Chaparri, where at least 100+ were drinking from the stream down from the lodge early in the morning.

Blue-black Grassquit – Volatinia jacarina: Two each at Iquitos and Explornapo were the only records from Amazonia. Otherwise recorded in small numbers near Jaen, on the lower east slope and at San Marcos.

Caqueta Seedeater – Sporophila murallae: Up to two gave nice looks in riverside vegetation near the lodge at Muyuna.

Lesson’s Seedeater – S. bouvronides: A male was seen with Lined Seedeaters at Muyuna.

Lined Seedeater – S. lineola: Seen only at Muyuna, where up to six were found in riverside vegetation near the lodge.

Black-and-white Seedeater – S. luctuosa: Just two were seen, between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Yellow-bellied Seedeater – S. nigricollis: A female was noted at Quebrada Mishkiyaki. Otherwise, three were seen well in the Utcubamba Valley near Hacienda Chillo.

Parrot-billed Seedeater – S. peruviana: 12 were seen at Chaparri.

Drab Seedeater – S. simplex: Seen only along the seminario road near Jaen, where at least 30+ were singing all around us.

Chestnut-bellied Seedeater – S. castaneiventris: Common in Amazonia and the lower east slope. The maximum count was 15 at Muyuna.

Chestnut-throated Seedeater – S. telasco: A huge concentration of 500+ was found in coastal reedbeds near Puerto Eten. Otherwise, 20 were noted in rice fields near Bagua Chica.

Chestnut-bellied Seed-Finch – Oryzoborus angolensis: Three single birds were seen at Explornapo and Muyuna. Elsewhere, a female was seen in the savanna near Restaurante Yacumama.

Band-tailed Seedeater – Catamenia analis: 10 were seen at Abra de Porculla. Otherwise, found to be common in the highlands of the Maranon Valley, with a maximum of 50 at Rio Chonta. In addition, about 25 were noted along the upper section of the Santa Eulalia road.

Plain-colored Seedeater – C. inornata: Six were seen at Abra Barro Negro and 20 were seen at various stops between Celendin and Cajamarca.

Dull-colored Grassquit – Tiaris obscura: Six were seen along the seminario road near Jaen. Also, four were noted at Balsas and eight at San Marcos.

Rusty Flowerpiercer – Diglossa sittoides: One was seen near Pomacochas and two gave great views in the Utcubamba Valley near Hacienda Chillo.

White-sided Flowerpiercer – D. albilatera: Four were seen near Pomacochas and two were noted above Leimebamba.

Moustached Flowerpiercer – D. mystacalis: Up to eight were seen in the scrub and forest fragments above Leimebamba.

Black-throated Flowerpiercer – D. brunneiventris: Common in the highlands of the Maranon Valley with as many as 10 between Celendin and Cajamarca, and 12 at Rio Chonta.

Deep-blue Flowerpiercer – Diglossopis glauca: One was seen in a fast moving flock below Campamento Garcia.

Bluish Flowerpiercer – D. caerulescens: One was seen near Pomacochas.

Masked Flowerpiercer – D. cyanea: Up to six were seen in the forest patches above Leimebamba. Another was seen near Pomacochas.

Golden-bellied Grosbeak – Pheucticus chrysogaster: Common in the arid northwest with a maximum of 30 at Chaparri. Also found to be common in the dry intermontain valleys of the Maranon, where up to six between Celendin and Cajamarca and at Rio Chonta.

Buff-throated Saltator – Saltator maximus: One was seen at Explornapo. More common on the lower east slope, where a maximum of eight were seen between Moyabamba and Rioja.

Grayish Saltator – S. coerulescens: Just two were seen at Explornapo and a single at Muyuna.

Black-cowled Saltator – S. nigriceps: Seen only at Abra de Porculla, where at least 10 were present.

Golden-billed Saltator – S. aurantiirostris: Fairly common, with six between Limon and Celendin, and 12 between Celendin and Cajamarca. Also, two were logged at Rio Chonta.

Streaked Saltator – S. striatipectus: Six birds of the faintly streaked form flavidicollis were seen at Bosque de Pomac. The heavily streaked form peruvianus was quite common in the dry Maranon Valley.

Crested Oropendola – Psarocolius decumanus: One was seen at Explornapo, and two were noted near Aguas Verdes.

Russet-backed Oropendola – P. angustifrons: The most common and widespread oropendola in Amazonia and the lower east slope. Up to 30 were seen at Muyuna and around Aguas Verdes.

Band-tailed Oropendola – Ocyalus latirostris: A pleasant surprise was a flock of five on a mature river island near Explornapo. We had excellent looks at this rarely seen and elusive icterid.

Yellow-rumped Cacique – Cacicus cela: This cacique is very common throughout Amazonia and in the eastern foothills.

Scarlet-rumped Cacique – C. uropygialis: Two birds were seen in the fruiting trees above Afluente.

Mountain Cacique – C. chrysonotus: Up to six were seen below Abra Patricia.

Solitary Cacique – C. solitarius: Single birds were seen at Explornapo and at Muyuna.

Yellow-tailed Oriole – Icterus mesomelas: One bird was seen near Jaen and up to two seen well at Balsas.

White-edged Oriole – I. graceannae: Common in the arid northwest with 15 at Bosque de Pomac and 20 at Chaparri.

Orange-backed Troupial – I. croconutus: As many as six were seen in the savanna near Restaurante Yacumama.

Oriole Blackbird – Gymnomystax mexicanus: Locally common along rivers in Amazonia. Up to 20 seen en route to Explornapo and near Iquitos.

Yellow-hooded Blackbird – Agelaius icterocephalus: Up to four were seen in riverine habitats at scattered localities in Amazonia.

Red-breasted Blackbird – Leistes militaris: Single birds were seen en route to Explornapo and near Iquitos. In addition, eight were seen at Laguna Pomacochas.

Peruvian Meadowlark – Sturnella bellicosa: At least 20 were noted at Lomas de Lachay. Otherwise, up to four were seen in the arid northwest and in the dry Maranon Valley.

Velvet-fronted Grackle – Lampropsar tanagrinus: Up to six were seen in varzea at Muyuna.

Scrub Blackbird – Dives warszewiczi: Two were seen at Bosque de Pomac and two were noted near Abra de Porculla.

Shiny Cowbird – Molothrus bonariensis: One was seen at Muyuna. This is a common bird in the arid northwest, where a maximum of 30 seen at Bosque de Pomac. Only a couple of single birds were noted on the east slope, including one at Km 401 above Afluente.

Giant Cowbird – Dolichonyx oryzivorus: Up to five were seen at scattered sites in Amazonia. Also, up to 10 seen at Aguas Verdes.

Mammal List:

Brown-throated Three-toed Sloth – Bradypus variegatus: One at Muyuna.

Long-nosed Bat – Rhynchonycteris naso: Several were seen at Eplornapo and Muyuna.

Fishing Bat – Nactilio leporinus: Several were seen whilst out at night at Muyuna.

Pygmy Marmoset – Cebuella pygmaea: Up to three at Explornapo Lodge.

Saddle-backed Tamarin – Saguinus fuscicollis: A small troop was seen at Allpahuayo/Mishana reserve.

Black-mantled Tamarin – S. nigricollis: A couple at Explornapo.

Night Monkey – Aotus species: One was seen in the spotlight briefly at Muyuna.

Dusky Titi Monkey – Callicebus moloch: Three were seen at Muyuna.

Yellow-handed Titi Monkey – C. torquatus: Great looks of one at Explornapo.

Common Squirrel Monkey – Saimiri sciureus: Several were seen at Muyuna.

Brown Capuchin Monkey – Cebus apella: At least one was seen at Muyuna.

Red Howler Monkey – Alouatta seniculus: Heard predawn at Muyuna.

South American Coati – Nasua nasua: One was seen at Quebrada Mishkiyaku.

Sechuran Fox: One was seen at Bosque de Pomac.

Pink River Dolphin – Inia geoffrensis: Several brief sufacings were noted whilst on boat rides to and from Explornapo and Muyuna.

White-tailed Deer – Odocoileus virginianus: Seen from the boat en route to Explornapo.

Squirrel species – Sciurus species: One at Bosque de Pomac.

Guayaquil Squirrel – Sciurus stramineus: Seen at Bosque de Pomac and Chaparri.

Paca – Agouti paca: One was seen at night at Muyuna.

Mountain Viscachas - Lagidium viscacia: A couple were seen near Celendin.

Dark-headed Tree Rat – Echimys saturnus: One was seen at Explornapo.

Mountain Bamboo Rat - Dactylomys peruanus: Heard at night at Abra Patricia Lodge.

South American Sea Lion - Otaria byronia: This species was abundant on the pelagic out of Callao.

David Beadle
Toronto

February 2008