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North Peru Megas - Scarlet Banded Barbet - October 11-19 2012

Published by Barry Walker (Barry.Walker AT ManuExpeditions.com)


A 9 day trip to North Peru targeting some of the sexy species - and we had to rush a little bit but we successfully saw some very good species indeed including Scarlet-banded Barbet, Long-whiskered Owlet, Marvelous Spatuletail, Pale-billed, Chestnut & Ochre-fronted Antpittas, Royal Sunangel, Point-tailed Palmcreeper, Jet Manakin, Fiery-throated & Scarlet-breasted Fruiteaters, Grey-tailed Piha, Foothill Antwren, Mishana Tyrannulet, Piura Chat-Tyrant, Henna Hooded and Rufous-necked Foliage-gleaners & Bar-winged Wood-Wren, Maranon Spinetail & Crescentchest . Despite a rainy day on our one day on the Barbet Ridge we did very well indeed. Some unusual sun for this time of year at Abra Patricia and low flock activity there we managed to see a wide variety of the special birds of this endemic area including 42 species of Hummingbirds most seen very well at feeding stations, 41 species of Tanager and recorded 16 true Peruvian endemic and many other range restricted species including several near endemics. 378 species in all.

DAY BY DAY ACTIVITIES

October 11th: Meet at Dunkin Donuts in Lima airport and flight to Tarapoto and the Scarlet-banded Barbet Camp.


On arrival we met our drivers & field chef Aurelio. We then drove by bus and then specially modified Toyota 4 x 4 pickups for several hours to the Barbet Camp on a brick hard road and blazing sunshine. A 3 course dinner concluded the day and we retired with great expectations for the following morning. In the evening the heavens opened and it rained and thundered all night, breaking off to a steady drizzle at dawn. Night at the Barbet Camp at 1400 meters, Department of San Martin.

October 12th: A full day birding the Ridgeline trail out of camp and to the East.

Rain! What to do? It was just about birdable and we set off with trepidation to the muddy trail which was not as bad as we thought. It was a tricky muddy trail and we had to deal with constant drizzle but incredibly rewarding– we spent all day with a field lunch packed in by Aurelio, seeing multiple Scarlet-banded Barbets ( two almost in town!) and other hard to see species and spent an elated night in camp with no rain (important for our exit next day). Birding elevations 1400-1700 meters, Department of San Martin. Night in Camp.

October 13th: Birding the camp area and onto Moyobamba

The weather behaved and our vehicles arrived late despite the road being very, very tricky and we were lucky to get out. As Aurelio and Walter were breaking camp we birded an area of Melastomes near camp and saw some great birds. Then it was a long drive to our comfortable hotel in Moyobamba via a stop to look for Oilbirds. Night Moyobamba, Department of San Martin.

October 14th: Morro de Calzada and Abra Patricia

Dawn found us at the municipal reserve of Morro de Calzada where we birded the nutrient poor soil forest and scrub. We backtracked to the Wanquanki Hummingbird feeders where we had a great time and reluctantly we headed onto the open country dominated by bracken and Mauritia Palm near Rioja for lunch and birding, before continuing to the ECOAN Owlet Lodge at Abra Patrica with some late afternoon birding there. [ECOAN is a Peruvian NGO working mainly on the conservation of cloud and Polylepis forests http://www.ecoanperu.org/] Night Owlet Lodge. Department of San Martin. Night Owlet Lodge

October 15th: Abra Patricia

We spent our time between walking trails and birding the roadside at different elevations between the pass at 2200 meters to 1700 at Alta Nieve. Flocks were scarce but we did manage to winkle out most of the specialties’ of the area, had a marvelous time at the Hummingbird feeders. Unusual sun for this time of year hampered us somewhat. Returning to Abra Patricia we set off down the Owlet trail to be followed by local guide Roberto. It was the first time that Roberto and I had never heard an Owlet call – not surprising in a thunder and lightning storm and rain. Suggestions of waiting it out were dismissed and we trudged back to the lodge in the rain where on arrival conditions were now perfect – we could imagine the Owlets being very active but it was too late. Department of San Martin. Night Owlet Lodge

October 16th: Abra Patricia

We birded the lodge and road area at the pass and then did a loop through the forest on the Grallaria and Mono trails. The afternoon was set aside for another Owlet attempt. At the appointed time black clouds rolled in and we were told it was local and would clear up – which it did – but the majority of the group decided to go look for a Cinnamon Screech Owl whilst Jim headed down the Owlet trail – success! He saw and Owlet and we saw the Screech Owl! Department of San Martin

October 17th: San Lorenzo and Huembo and onto Jaen

A rainy morning found us at the bottom of a steep trail (almost a staircase in parts) that took us up to a small patch of Chusquea bamboo in pretty torrential rain but we made it and 2 Pale-billed Antpitta’s treated us to marvelous views. We then went to the Marvelous Spatuletail interpretation centre at Huembo and after rousing Santos out of bed we were treated to – well Spatuletails, amongst others including Little Woodstar. We continued to Jaen with a stop in the Maranon Desert Scrub – a whole new set of birds. Night in Jaen Departments of Amazonas & Cajamarca

October 18th : Birding above Tamborapa on the La Coipa Road.

Full Day looking for Maranon specialties with great success and an early finish. Weather was mostly overcast and cool in place that can be very hot. Eric the Maranon Crescentchest behaved well. Night in Jaen. Department of Cajamarca.

October 19th: Jaen to Abra Porculla and Chiclayo

Early start to Abra Porculla ata round 2000 meters – the North Peruvian Low - where we birded until 11:00 am getting a taste of Tumbesian avifauna before heading to Chiclayo airport, saying goodbye to the crew and to Jim who was hiring a car for more birding, and late afternoon flight to Lima (where everyone was heading to Iquitos next day). Departments of Cajamarca & Lambeyeque.

MAJOR GPS READINGS

Oilbird Cave Moyobamba S 06 08 851 W76 50 471
Wanquanki: 06°04’29’’S – 76°58’32’’W – 990 m
Aguas Verdes Bridge: 05°41’04’’S – 77°39’14’’W – 1037 m
Afluente: 05°40’27’’S – 77°42’09’’ – 1418 m
Abra Patricia: 05°40’49’’S – 77°46’41’’W – 1970 m
ECOAN Huembo feeders: 05°51’26’’S –77°59’03’’W – 2053 m
Jaen S 05 42 869 W 078 48 253
Above Tamborapa S 05 26 11 W 078 48 92
Abra Porculla 05° 52.850’, 79° 32.397’1,800m

Species Lists

Taxonomy:
SACC = South American Classification Committee (Nov 2012)
http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.html
IOC = International Ornithologist’s Union http://www.worldbirdnames.org/

* = Heard Only
RR = Restricted-range species
E = Endemic to Peru
Conservation Status: Follows Birdlife International

HOODED TINAMOU Nothocercus nigrocapillus
Seen by Barry and Tony on one day and then by Jim the next on the Owlet trail at Abra Patricia

LITTLE TINAMOU Crypturellus soui*

TATAUPA TINAMOU Crypturellus tataupa*
Tataupa means house in Guarani as in those parts it was often around villages and houses.

Family: ANATIDAE (DUCKS AND GEESE)
TORRENT DUCK Merganetta armata
2 + on the Utcubamba River

Family: CRACIDAE (GUANS)
SPECKLED CHACHALACA Ortalis guttata

Family: PHALACROCORIDAE (CORMORANTS)
NEOTROPIC CORMORANT Phalacrocorax brasilanus
On the Huallaga River.

Family: ARDEIDAE (HERONS)
COCOI HERON Ardea cocoi
One near Rioja just before the rain.

CATTLE EGRET Bubulcus ibis
Common throughout the trip

GREAT EGRET Ardea alba
Some in the rice paddies near Tarapoto.

SNOWY EGRET Egretta thula
A few here and there

FASCIATED TIGER-HERON Tigrisoma fasciatum
Nice looks on the Utcubamba River – 6 at least

Family: CATHARTIDAE (NEW WORLD VULTURES)
TURKEY VULTURE Cathartes aura
Common throughout the trip

BLACK VULTURE Coragyps atratus
Common throughout the trip

LESSER-YELLOW-HEADED VULTURE Cathartes burrovianus
One at least in the open grasslands

Family: PANDIONIDAE (OSPREYS)
WESTERN OSPREY Pandion haliaetus
One with a fish near Rioja. Pandion cristatus (Eastern Osprey) – Sulawesi to Australia is split from P. haliaetus (Wink et al. 2004a, Christidis & Boles 2008). In Greek mythology Pandion II, son of Cecrops II and Metiadusa, had 4 children, one of whom, Nisus of Megara, was transformed into a Hawk. This metamorphis was probably what de Savigny (1809) had in mind when he created the genus Pandion.

Family: ACCIPITRIDAE (HAWKS)
SWALLOW-TAILED KITE Elanoides forficatus
One of the most beautiful raptors in South America! 3 seen.

ROADSIDE HAWK Buteo magnirostris
Seven of this common raptor seen

SHORT-TAILED HAWK Buteo brachyurus
4 sen in total – 2 near Tarapoto and 2 near Jaen

BLACK-HAWK EAGLE Spizaetus tyrannus
A wonderful 2 at the Barbet Camp and then one other near Tamborapa

Family: RALLIDAE (RAILS)
RUSSET-CROWNED CRAKE Anurolimnas viridis*
Near Rioja

Family: RECURVIROSTRIDAE (STILTS & AVOCETS)
BLACK-NECKED STILT Himantopus mexicanus
Common in the rice fields. Taxonomy is a bit confusing. The SACC says “Himantopus mexicanus was formerly considered a subspecies of Old World H. himantopus (“Common Stilt”). Some authors have treated southern South American melanurus (White-backed Stilt) as a separate species. The six taxa in the genus Himantopus form a near-globally distributed superspecies and between one to six species-level taxa recognized by various authors. Virtually no data are available relevant to taxon-ranking of allopatric populations. The contact between mexicanus and melanurus in South America, where at least some hybridization occurs, affords one of the best opportunities for such study.

Family CHARADRIIDAE (PLOVERES)
PIED PLOVER Hoploxypterus cayanus
One seen by some in the rice fields from the 4 x 4 ‘s Formerly called a lapwing, which it clearly is not, the IOC has come down in favour of Plover.

Family: JACANIDAE ( JACANAS)
WATTLED JACANA Jacana jacana
Common near Tarapoto

Family: COLUMBIDAE (PIGEONS)
BAND-TAILED PIGEON Patagioenas fasciata
Several sightings. Note that recent research has shown that the genus Columba is paraphyletic, with New World taxa being more closely related to Streptopelia than to Old World Columba pigeons. This is consistent with differences between New World and Old World Columba in terms of morphology, serology and ehavior. The suggestion was made to place all New World forms in the genus Patagioenas, and the AOU recently adopted this change in its latest checklist supplement

PLUMBEOUS PIGEON Patagioenas plumbea
Mostly heard but 4 seen at Abra Patricia

RUDDY PIGEON Patagioenas subvinacea*
VULNERABLE

EARED DOVE Zenaida auriculata
Very common

RUDDY GROUND-DOVE Columbina talpacoti
Common in the eastern lowlands.

ECUADORIAN GROUND-DOVE Columbina buckleyi
We saw the ruddy dorsti subspecies which is quite different from the gray coastal birds. Prof. Dr. Jean Dorst was a French ornithologist at the Museum Nationale d’Histoire Naturelle ( director 1975-1985)

CROAKING GROUND-DOVE Columbina cruziana
Common once into the Maranon.

BLUE-GROUND DOVE Claravis pretiosa
Several heard and one male seen well above Tamborapa

WHITE-TIPPED DOVE Leptotila verreauxi
Fairly common throughout the trip. Named for the impressive sounding John Baptiste Edouard Verreaux (1810-1868) French Natural History dealer and collector.

GRAY-FRONTED DOVE Leptotila rufaxilla*

RUDDY QUAIL-DOVE Geotrygon Montana*
At the Barbet Ridge

WHITE-THROATED QUAIL- DOVE Geotrygon frenata
One seen at Abra Patricia

Family: CUCULIDAE (CUCKOOS)
SQUIRREL CUCKOO Piaya cayana
Regular sightings.

SMOOTH-BILLED ANI Crotophaga ani
Common in the eastern lowlands

GROOVE-BILLED ANI Crotophaga sulcirostris
Common in the Maranon Canyon and the coast.

STRIPED CUCKOO Tapera naevia
One of the last birds of the trip seen by Patty

Family: STRIGIDAE (OWLS)
TROPICAL SCREECH-OWL Megascops choliba
Near our rooms at the Moyobamba Hotel

(RR) CINNAMON SCREECH-OWL Megascops pertersoni
Absolutely mind blowing views of one at eye level at Abra Patricia. Named for American pioneer ornithologist and artist Roger Tory Petersen (1908-1996)

WHITE-THROATED SCREECH-OWL Megascops albigularis
A pair seen by Jim and heard by the rest of us

RUFOUS-BANDED OWL Strix albitarsus*
Heard nightly at the Abra Patricia Lodge but could we see it?

BAND-BELLIED OWL Pulsatrix melanota*
At the Barbet camp but always late at night

PERUVIAN PYGMY-OWL Glaucidium peruanum
Seen on top of a cactus in the Maranon.

FERRUGINOUS PYGMY-OWL Glaucidium brasilianum*
One heard at Moyobamba

(E) LONG-WHISKERED OWLET Xenoglaux loweryi
Seen well on the second attempt by at Abra Patricia. Xenoglaux = Strange Owl. Named for George Hines Lowery US Zoologist ENDANGERED

Family STEATORNITHIDAE (OILBIRD)
OILBIRD Steatornis caripensis
50+ flying about after dark at the usual cave between Tarapoto and Moyobamba. Steatornis = Fatbird. Baron von Humboldt recorded that young Oilbirds were culled each year and rendered into fat, melted down into oil, which was highly prized for cooking.

Family: CAPRIMULGIDAE (NIGHTJARS)
BLACKISH NIGHTJAR Caprimulgus nigrescens
At the Barbet camp.

RUFOUS-BELLIED NIGHTHAWK Lurocalis rufiventris
One at dusk at Abra Patricia

Family: APODIDAE (SWIFTS)
CHESTNUT-COLLARED SWIFT Streptoprocne rutila
A flock of 20 in the Maranon

WHITE-COLLARED SWIFT Streptoprocne zonaris
Seen on two days in big flocks

GRAY-RUMPED SWIFT Chaetura cineireventris
At the Barbet Camp

SHORT-TAILED SWIFT Chaetura brachyura
6+ near Rioja

NEOTROPICAL PALM-SWIFT Tachornis squamata
20+ at Morro de Calzada

Family: TROCHILIDAE (HUMMINGBIRDS)
WHITE-NECKED JACOBIN Florisuga mellivora
At the Wanquanki Hummingbird Feeders

RUFOUS-BREASTED HERMIT Glaucis hirsute
One seen repeatedly at Wanquanki

(RR) BLACK-THROATED HERMIT Phaethornis atrimentalis
At the Wanquanki Hummingbird Feeders. We w the subspecies riojae

GREEN HERMIT Phaethornis guy
One at the Barbet Camp.

GREAT –BILLED HERMIT Phaethornis malaris
2 at the Wanquanki Hummingbird Feeders.

GRAY-CHINNED HERMIT Phaethornis griseogularis porcullae
2 at Abra Porculla

GRAY-CHINNED HERMIT Phaethornis griseogularis grisgularis
One seen near San Lorenzo

BROWN VIOLET-EAR Colibri delphinae
Two coming to the Owlet Lodge feeders

GREEN VIOLET-EAR Colibri thalassinus
Seen at the ECOAN feeders and common. Thallasinus = sea-green

SPARKLING VIOLET-EAR Colibri coruscans
Fairly common and seen several places during the trip. The bully of the feeders.

BLACK-THROATED MANGO Anthracothorax nigricollis
A few the Wanquanki Hummingbird Feeders

RUFOUS-CRESTED COQUETTE Lophornis delattrei
2 at the Wanquanki Hummingbird feeders. Named for Adolphe de Lattre, French collector in Mexico and Colombia

WIRE-CRESTED THORNTAIL Discosura popelairii
A female on the Barbet Ridge

SPECKLED HUMMINGBIRD Adelomyia melanogenys
Excellent views at the feeders at Abra Patricia.

LONG-TAILED SYLPH Aglaiocercus kingi
Common at the Owlet Lodge feeders

GREEN-TAILED TRAINBEARER Lesbia nuna
A female at Huembo. From the Greek Lesbias – a woman of Lesbos. Nuna – from Nouna –Koali , a graceful Indian virgin in Jean F Denis’s novel (1829) “Ismael Ben Kaizar ou la decouverture du Nouveau Monde”. Food for thought?

(RR) ROYAL SUNANGEL Heliangelus regalis
A total of 3 males seen on two different ridges. ENDANGERED

EMERALD-BELLIED PUFFLEG Eriocnemis alinae
Common in the forest and at the feeders at the Owlet Lodge

(E) MARVELOUS SPATULETAIL Loddigesia mirabilis
Marvellous! Several males and females seen repeatedly at Huembo. The genus is named after British taxidermist and natural history dealer G. Loddiges (1784-1846), who specialised in hummingbirds! ENDANGERED

BRONZY INCA Coeligena coeligena
Daily at the Owlet Lodge feeders and some at the Huembo feeders

COLLARED INCA Coeligena torquata
Another star player at the Owlet Lodge feeders

VIOLET-THROATED STARFRONTLET Coeligena violifer
2 on the hike up to the Pale-billed Antpitta

CHESTNUT-BREASTED CORONET Boissonneaua metthewsi
The dominant bully at the Owlet Lodge and Huembo feeders. Named for English botanist and collector in the neotropics Andrew Matthews

BOOTED RACKET-TAIL Ocreatus underwoodii
Great looks at a male on the Barber Ridge. The Racket tailed Puffleg was unknown in life but specimens existed in various London cabinets, whence a drawing was sent in 1832 by Mr. Underwood on behalf of Charles Stokes, a London stockbroker and collector

FAWN-BREASTED BRILLIANT Heliodoxa rubinoides
One of the stars of the Owlet Lodge feeders

VIOLET-FRONTED BRILLIANT Heliodoxa leadbeateri
Common at the Owlet Lodge feeders

LONG-BILLED STARTHROAT Heliomaster longirostris
One at the Wanquanki Hummingbird Feeders

WHITE-BELLIED WOODSTAR Chaetocercus mulsant
Wonderful views of this insect-bird, at the Owlet Lodge feeders

(RR) LITTLE WOODSTAR Chaetocercus bombus
A rare hummingbird – 3 seen at the Huembo feeders. VULNERABLE

PURPLE-COLLARED WOODSTAR Myrtis fanny
Several females/eclipse males along the La Coipa road

BLUE-TAILED EMERALD Chlorostilbon mellisugus
Seen at the Wanquanki feeders.

VIOLET-HEADED HUMMINGBIRD Klais guimeti
A few at the Wanquanki Hummingbird Feeders

GREY-BREASTED SABREWING Campylopterus largipennis
Common at the Wanquanki feeders

NAPO SABREWING Campylopterus villaviscensio
A male showed briefly at moro de Calzada

FORK-TAILED WOODNYMPH Thalurania furcata
Common at the Wanquanki Hummingbird Feeders and a few on the Barber Ridge

MANY-SPOTTED HUMMINGBIRD Taphrospilus hypostictus
At the Wanquanki Hummingbird Feeders.

(E) SPOT-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD Leucippus taczanowskii
Fairly common in the Maranon Canyon. Named for Wladyslaw taczanowski (1819-1890) Polish Ornithologist and collector.

WHITE-BELLIED HUMMINGBIRD Amazilia chionogaster
Visiting the feeders at Huembo.

ANDEAN EMERALD Amazilia franciae
4 seen at the ECOAN feeders at Huembo and at the Owlet Lodge

AMAZILIA HUMMINGBIRD Amazilia amazilia
At Abra Poculla and along the coast

SAPPHIRE-SPANGLED EMERALD Polyerata lactea
At the Wanquanki Hummingbird Feeders

GOLDEN-TAILED SAPPHIRE Chrysuronia oenone
At the Wanquanki Hummingbird Feeders

WHITE-CHINNED SAPPHIRE Hylocharis cyanus
At the Wanquanki Hummingbird Feeders

Family: TROGONIDAE (TROGONS)
BLACK-TAILED TROGON Trogon melanurus*

MASKED TROGON Trogon personatus
Three at the Owlet Lodge

COLLARED TROGON Trogon collaris
Fairly common on the Barbet Ridge

BLUE-CROWNED TROGON Trogon curucui
A pair at Morro de Calzada

Family: ALECEDINIDAE (KINGFISHERS)
RINGED KINGFISHER Megaceryle torquata

Family: BUCCONIDAE (PUFFBIRDS)
STRIOLATED PUFFBIRD Nystalus striolatus*
At Morro de Calzada

WHITE-FACED NUNBIRD (PUFFBIRD) Hapaloptila castanea*
Unfortunately only heard.

WHITE-FRONTED NUNBIRD Monasa morphoeus
2 on the barbet Ridge. Monasa is Greek for solitary or a monk a reference to the plain plumage and quiet behavior of the Nunbirds. Morpheus – Greek mythology son of sleep and god of dreams.

BLACK-FRONTED NUNBIRD Monasa nigrifrons
Common at Morro de Calzada

SWALLOW-WING Chelidoptera tenebrosa
Common at Morro de Calzada

Family: CAPITONIDAE (NEW WORLD BARBETS)
(E) SCARLET-BANDED BARBET Capito wallacei VULNERABLE
Our most targeted bird! We saw a total of 10+ individuals and we saw them well! Stunning! The first two were almost in the village. Years before I had made the arduous climb from the Cushabatay River to the top of the Cordillera Azul. Now you can drive to them. I checked my GPS and where we saw them was 80 km away from the type locality. Doesn’t sound far but it would take you months to walk it! Stunning and satisfying!

Family: CAPITONIDAE (NEW WORLD BARBETS)
(E) SCARLET-BANDED BARBET Capito wallacei VULNERABLE
Our most targeted bird! We saw a total of 10+ individuals and we saw them well! Stunning! The first two were almost in the village. Years before I had made the arduous climb from the Cushabatay River to the top of the Cordillera Azul. Now you can drive to them. I checked my GPS and where we saw them was 80 km away from the type locality. Doesn’t sound far but it would take you months to walk it! Stunning and satisfying!

GILDED BARBET Capito auratus
5+ seen at Morro de Calzada

VERSICOLORED BARBET Eubucco versicolor
Common at the Barbet Camp with 4 seen on two days

Family: RAMPHASTIDAE (TOUCANS)
CHANNEL-BILLED TOUCAN Ramphastos vitellinus*

BLACK-THROATED TOUCANET Aulacorhynchus atrogularis
2 seen. Aulacorhynchus atrogularis is split from A. prasinus –Emerald Toucanet (Puebla-Olivares et al. 2008, Navarro et al. 2001); AOU needs proposal.

CHESTNUT-TIPPED TOUCANET Aulacorhynchus derbianus
3 seen at the Barbet Ridge

CHESTNUT-EARED ARACARI Pteroglossus castanotis
2 seen. “Arasari” is a Brazilian Amerindian name for a small toucan. In Greek Pteroglossus means “feather tongued” a reference to the slim feather-like tongues of toucans and aracaris

Family: PICIDAE (WOODPECKERS)
(RR) ECUADORIAN PICULET Picumnus sclateri

YELLOW-TUFTED WOODPECKER Melanerpes cruentatus
2 on the Barbet Ridg

(RR) SCARLET-BACKED WOODPECKER Veniliornis callonotus
One seen on the La Coipa road – one of the Tumbezian birds that gets into the Maranon Canyon.

LITTLE WOODPECKER Veniliornis passerinus
Seen near Moyobamba

CRIMSON-MANTLED WOODPECKER Colaptes rivolii
Three at Abra Patricia

GOLDEN-OLIVE WOODPECKER Colaptes rubiginosus
Three on the Barbet Ridge

Family: FALCONIDAE (FALCONS)
NORTHERN CRESTED CARACARA Caracara cheriway
Common scrounging for carrion on roads. As there are no true Crows in South America, Caracaras occupy that niche as omnivorous scavengers. Small numbers at several sites Formerly placed in the genus Polyborus but, this species has been switched to the genus Caracara. Note also that the former species known as Crested Caracara, has been split into three species with those ranging north of north-west Peru and the Amazon River ( i.e Colombia) are referable to Northern Crested-Caracara C. cheriway while another form, the extinct Guadalupe Caracara C. lutosus, of Guadalupe Island, Mexico, has also been given its untimely species status. The SACC says “Caracara cheriway and C. plancus were formerly considered conspecific (e.g., Hellmayr & Conover 1949, Phelps & Phelps 1958a), sometimes also including C. lutosus of Guadalupe Island (e.g., Meyer de Schauensee 1970, Stresemann and Amadon 1979), but the ranges of cheriway and plancus are nearly parapatric with no sign of intergradation, contrary to earlier interpretations (see Banks REF); they constitute a superspecies. The three forms had previously been considered separate species by REFS, Pinto (1938), and Friedmann (1950).”

LAUGHING FALCON Herpetotheres cachinnans
A total of 2 seen at our last lunch stop.

AMERICAN KESTREL Falco sparverius
Fairly common

BAT FALCON Falco rufigularis
One on a drive and two at Morro de Calzada

Family: PSITTACIDAE (PARROTS)
MILITARY MACAW Ara militaris* VULNERABLE

SCARLET-FRONTED PARAKEET Aratinga wagleri
A flock of around 12 on La Coipa road

WHITE-EYED PARAKEET Aratinga leucophthalma
Common at the lower areas of Abra Patricia and around Moyobamba

ROSE-FRONTED PARAKEET Pyrrhura roseifrons
Fairly common on the barbet Ridge with flocks seen both days

PACIFIC PARROTLET Forpus coelestis
One in the desert near Jaen – presumably a recent colonizer of the Maranon Valley

COBALT-WINGED PARAKEET Brotogeris cyanoptera
Around 40 seen near Moyobamba. Here the subspecies gustavi with yellow on the wings. SACC comment: The subspecies gustavi was formerly (e.g., Cory 1918, Peters 1937) considered a separate species from Brotogeris cyanoptera, but Traylor (1958) indicated that they probably intergrade in the Huallaga valley.

BLUE-HEADED PARROT Pionus menstruus
Common at Morro de Calzadas

SPECKLE-FACED PARROT Pionus tumultuosus
3 at Abra Patricia.

SCALY-NAPED AMAZON Amazonas mercenaria
Common at Abra Patricia

Family: THAMNOPHILIDAE (ANTBIRDS)
FASCIATED ANTSHRIKE Cymbilaimus lineatus*

(RR) COLLARED ANTSHRIKE Thamnophilus bernardi shumbae
The shumbae race restricted to the Maranon Canyon looks very different from the coastal forms and may represent a separate species. Sakesphorus bernardi is assigned to Thamnophilus (Irestedt et al. 2004; Brumfield & Edwards 2007, SACC 278)

BARRED ANTSHRIKE Thamnophilus doliatus
At Wanquanki

(RR) CHAPMANS ANTSHRIKE Thamnophilus zarumae
Common at Abra Porculla wit perhaps 8 seen

(RR) NORTHERN SLATY ANTSHRIKE Thamnophilus punctatus leucogaster
Fairly common along the La Coipa road. The SACC says “Thamnophilus atrinucha, T. stictocephalus, T. sticturus, T. pelzelni, and T. ambiguus were formerly (e.g., Cory & Hellmayr 1924, Pinto 1937, Peters 1951, Meyer de Schauensee 1970) considered conspecific with T. punctatus, with the broad species known as "Slaty Antshrike," but see Willis (1982) and Isler et al. (1997) for recognition as species, based mainly on vocal differences. Genetic data (Brumfield & Edwards 2007) indicate that atrinucha and punctatus belong to separate groups within Thamnophilus. SACC proposal pending to modify English name of atrinucha. Ridgely & Greenfield (2001) further recognized leucogaster of the Marañon Valley (with huallagae of Huallaga Valley) as a separate species; this taxon was tentatively retained as a subspecies of T. punctatus by Isler et al. (1997), with further evidence confirming subspecies status presented by Isler et al. (2001). The subspecies huallagae was formerly (e.g. Peters 1951) treated as a subspecies of T. amazonicus, but see Isler et al. (1997). Genetic data (Lacerda et al. 2007) indicate that ranking pelzelni and ambiguus as species is consistent with levels of divergence within this group.

VARIABLE ANTSHRIKE Thamnophilus caerulescens
Common at Abra Patricia

LINED ANTSHRIKE Thamnophilus tenuepunctatus
Cracking looks 3 birds on the Barbet Ridge.

PLAIN ANTVIREO Dysithamnus mentalis
A female at Abra Patricia

FOOTHILL ANTWREN Epinecrophylla spodionota
A nice male one day and a pair the next day on the barbet ridge – others heard – seems to be common here.

SLATY ANTWREN Myrmotherula schisticolor
A male seen on the Barbet Ridge

STREAK-HEADED ANTBIRD Drymophila straticeps
Two seen in the bamboo at Abra Patricia. We wrote this in on our list as Long-tailed Antbird but it was already there as the recent split! That’s why we could not find it. The article in Condor “AN INTEGRATIVE APPROACH TO SPECIES-LEVEL SYSTEMATICS REVEALS THE DEPTH OF DIVERSIFICATION IN AN ANDEAN THAMNOPHILID, THE LONG-TAILED ANTBIRD” By Morton L. Isler1,3, Andrés M. Cuervo2, Gustavo A, Bravo2, and Robb T. Brumfield2 In part says “we propose the following taxonomic positions and English names for members of the complex. Regarding the English names, we have rejected the inclusion of “long-tailed” in the names, as proposed by Cory and Hellmayr (1924), because the names would become too cumbersome. The sequence reflects the estimated phylogeny:

Drymophila klagesi Hellmayr and Seilern, 1912—Klages’s Antbird. Eastern and northern Venezuela, Serranía de Perijá, and northern Eastern Andes in Norte de Santander, Colombia (includes klagesi, aristeguietana, and Norte de Santander study groups; clade A).

Drymophila hellmayri Todd, 1915—Santa Marta Antbird. Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia (includes hellmayri; clade B).

Drymophila caudata (Sclater, 1854)—Long-tailed Antbird.
Eastern Andes from Santander (west of the ChicamochaCanyon) to Caquetá and Huila, Colombia (includes Santander and Upper Magdalena study groups; clade C).

Drymophila striaticeps Chapman, 1912—Streak-headed Antbird. The Western and Central Andes of Colombia south through Ecuador (both slopes) and Peru (eastern slope) to northwestern Bolivia in La Paz (includes striaticeps, occidentalis, peruviana, and boliviana; clade D).

RUFOUS-RUMPED ANTWREN Terenura callinota
A female in a mixed flock on the Barbet Ridge

BLACKISH ANTBIRD Cercomacra nigrescens
A co-operative pair on the Barbet Ridge and heard elsewhere. Here, the subspecies aequatorialis

Family: MELANOPAREIIDAE (CRESCENTCHESTS)
(RR) ELEGANT CRESCENTCHEST Melanopareia elegans
Nice look at one at Abra Porculla

(E)MARANON CRESCENTCHEST Melanopareia maranonica
My tame one – Eric – performed exceptionally well and we saw two more later walking down the road.

Family: GRALLARIIDAE (ANTPITTAS)
CHESTNUT-CROWNED ANTPITTA Grallaria ruficapilla
Against all odds one walked onto a bare patch of ground at Abra Porculla

SCALED ANTPITTA Grallaria guatimalensis
We worked on one at the Barbet ridge and it was seen by some

(E) PALE-BILLED ANTPITTA Grallaria carrikeri
Great looks at two this impressive endemic Antpitta – in my opinion more impressive than Jocotoco Antpitta ( which is not an endemic) occurring north of this species in Peru.

(E) CHESTNUT ANTPITTA Grallaria blakei
One seen on two occasiona at the junction of Grallaria and mono trails at Abra Patricia

(E) OCHRE-FRONTED ANTPITTA Grallaricula ochraceifrons
Two seen in the afternoon on the Owlet trail responding to playback. Another most wanted species. ENDANGERED

RUSTY-BREASTED ANTPITTA Grallaricula ferrugineipectus*
Heard at Abra Patricia The subspecies rara was formerly (e.g., Cory & Hellmayr 1924) treated as a separate species from Grallaricula ferrugineipectus, but Peters (1951) treated them as conspecific. Ridgely & Tudor (1984) suspected that G. ferrugineipectus might consist of more than one species. Krabbe & Schulenberg (2003a) indicated that vocal differences suggest that the southern subspecies leymebambae deserves recognition as a separate species

(E) CHESTNUT ANTPITTA Grallaria blakei
One seen on two occasiona at the junction of Grallaria and mono trails at Abra Patricia

(E) OCHRE-FRONTED ANTPITTA Grallaricula ochraceifrons
Two seen in the afternoon on the Owlet trail responding to playback. Another most wanted species. ENDANGERED

RUSTY-BREASTED ANTPITTA Grallaricula ferrugineipectus*
Heard at Abra Patricia The subspecies rara was formerly (e.g., Cory & Hellmayr 1924) treated as a separate species from Grallaricula ferrugineipectus, but Peters (1951) treated them as conspecific. Ridgely & Tudor (1984) suspected that G. ferrugineipectus might consist of more than one species. Krabbe & Schulenberg (2003a) indicated that vocal differences suggest that the southern subspecies leymebambae deserves recognition as a separate species

Family: RHINOCRYPTIDAE (TAPACULOS)
TRILLING TAPACULO Scytalopus parvirostris
One seen by Jim along the Owlet trail.

(E) RUFOUS-VENTED TAPACULO Scytalopus femoralis
Several encounters with this sneaky Tapaculo at Abra Patricia and one seen really well

WHITE-CROWNED TAPACULO Scytalopus atratus*
One on the Barbet ridge – watch this one as the form in the Cordillera Azul sounds different from others.

Family: FORMICARIIDAE (ANTTHRUSHES)
RUFOUS-BREASTED ANTHRUSH Formicarius rufipectus
Fairly common on the Barbet Ridge and one seen well by all.

Family: FURNARIIDAE (OVENBIRDS)
OLIVACEOUS WOODCREEPER Sittasomus griseicapillus amazonas
1 at Morro de Calzada. Note where you see these and what subspecies they are –they WILL be split as sure as death and taxes!

PLAIN-BROWN WOODCREEPER Dendrocincla fuliginosa
One at Morro de Calzada

“FOOTHILL” LONG-TAILED WOODCREEPER Deconychura longicauda ssp.nov
Several sightings at the Barbet ridge –at least 6 birds

WEDGE-BILLED WOODCREEPER Glyphorynchus spirurus
One at Morro de Calzada

AMAZONIAN BARRED WOODCREEPER Dendrocolaptes certhia
2 in a palm grove near Rioja responded to playback.

MONTANE WOODCREEPER Lepidocolaptes lacrymiger
1 in a mixed-species flock at Abra Patricia

LINEATED WOODCREEPER Lepidocolaptes albolineatus
2 on the Barbet Ridge

PLAIN XENOPS Xenops minutus
One on the Barbet Ridge

STREAKED XENOPS Xenops rutilans
3 on the Barbet Ridge

POINT-TAILED PALMCREEPER Berlepschia rikeri
An individual called in and flying between their homes – the Mauritia Palms near Rioja – great looks were had by all after some effort.

STREAKED TUFTEDCHEEK Pseudocolaptes boissonneautii
One at Abra Patricia and at Abra Barro Negro. The species name is a miss-spelling, following naming the species after French ornithologist and author, A. Boissonneau. No wonder they lost the Napoleonic wars – these Frenchies were out birding all the time!

RUSTY-WINGED BARBTAIL Premnornis guttuliger
One seen by Jim at Abra Patricia

PACIFIC HORNERO Furnarius cinnamomeus
A few in the Maranon Canyon and along the coast. Furnarius cinnamomeus is split from F. leucopus (Ridgely & Greenfield 2001, Parker and Carr 1992); SACC 35 needs analysis

CHESTNUT-WINGED FOLIAGE-GLEANER Philydor erythropterum
At least two on the barbet ridge

RUFOUS-RUMPED FOLIAGE-GLEANER Philydor erythrocercum ochrogaster
On the Barbet ridge and at Abra Patricia. This of the foothill ochrogaster subspecies – watch this one!

BUFF-FRONTED FOLIAGE –GLEANER Philydor rufum
One on the Barbet Ridge

(RR) RUFOUS-NECKED FOLIAGE GLEANER Syndactyla ruficollis
A pair at Abra Porculla inter-reacting and coming into the open VULNERABLE

(RR) HENNA-HOODED FOLIAGE-GLEANER Hylocryptus erythrocephalus
Great looks at one at Abra Porculla. VULNERABLE

STRIPED TREEHUNTER
A pair at dusk on the Mono trail

[MARAÑON] RUFOUS-FRONTED THORNBIRD Phacellodomus rufifrons peruvianus
Good views at Morro e Calzada, here the subspecies peruvianus, sometimes treated as a distinct species. SACC comment: Ridgely & Greenfield (2001) considered northern inornatus (with castilloi) a separate species from Phacellodomus rufifrons, and this was followed by and Hilty (2003); vocalizations are reported to differ, but no analysis or data have been published. SACC proposal to recognize inornatus as separate species did not pass because of insufficient published data. Ridgely & Greenfield (2001) also suggested that the subspecies peruvianus of the Marañon valley deserved recognition as a separate species.

AZARA'S SPINETAIL Synallaxis azarae
Seen and mostly heard at Abra Patricia. Pipsqueak! Named for the impressive sounding Brigadier-General Felix Manuel de Azara, Spanish military engineer commanding the Paraguay/Brazilian frontier 1781-1801. He was also a naturalist

(RR) MARANON SPINETAIL Synallaxis maranonica
7/8 seen along the La Coipa road – common but sneaky! CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

RUFOUS SPINETAIL Synallaxis unirufa
2 seen at Abra Patricia

(RR) CHINCHIPE (NECKLACED) SPINETAIL Synallaxis (stictothorax) chinchipensis
6+ on the La Coipa road. The SACC says “Ridgely & Tudor (1994) and Ridgely & Greenfield (2001) considered the upper Marañon population chinchipensis as a separate species, but no analysis or data published. SACC proposal to elevate chinchipensis to species rank did not pass because of insufficient published data. One in the tick bank

LINE-CHEEKED SPINETAIL Cranioleuca antisiensis
Common at Abra Porculla

ASH-BROWED SPINETAIL Cranioleuca curtata
2 on the Barbet Ridge. VULNERABLE

Family: TYRANNIDAE (TYRANT FLYCATCHERS)
SOOTY-HEADED TYRANNULET Phyllomyias griseiceps
2 at Morro de Calzada

YELLOW-CROWNED TYRANNULET Tyrannulus elatus
The Free Beer bird seen at Morro de Calzada

WHITE-CRESTED ELAENIA Elaenia albiceps
One on the Barbet Ridge

YELLOW-BELLIED ELAENIA Elaenia flavogaster
1 seen at lunch near Rioja

SIERRAN ELAENIA Elaenia pallatangae
Common at Abra Patricia.

LESSER ELAENIA Elaenia chiriquensis
Despite its name bigger than Plain-crested. We put these down at Morro de Calzada as Plain-crested and oversight on my part they were Lesser. (Plain-crested is only known for dry areas of Cusco and the Pampas del Heath).

SOUTHERN BEARDLESS-TYRANNULET Camptostoma obsoletum
Several sightings during the trip.

MOUSE-COLORED TYRANNULET Phaeomyias murina wagae
1 near Moyonamba of the wagae subspecies

(RR) TUMBEZIAN TYRANNULET Phaeomyias tumbezana maranonica
Several in the Maranon Canyon.The SACC says : Ridgely & Tudor (1994) noted that vocal differences suggest that Phaeomyias murina might consist of more than one species. Ridgely & Greenfield (2001) considered the subspecies tumbezana (with inflava and maranonica) of southwestern Ecuador and northwestern Peru to represent a separate species based on differences in vocalizations. Rheindt et al. (2008c) found genetic evidence consistent with two species Proposal needed. Split bu IOC.

(RR) GRAY AND WHITE TYRANNULET Pseudelaenia leucospodia
We had a couople for lunch at our last stop!

RUFOUS-HEADED PYGMY-TYRANT Pseudotriccus ruficeps
One at Abra Patricia

TAWNY-CROWNED PYGMY TYRANT Euscarthmus meloryphus
Vocal and common along the La Coipa road. We saw the fulviceps race.

(E) PERUVIAN TYRANNULET Zimmerius viridiflavus
20+ seen in total in the Abra Patricia area and on the Barbet Ridge. These are vocally identical to those found in Central Peru, but recently there has been considerable debate about whether these are distinct from the Golden-faced Tyrannulet (likewise the species status of Loja Tyrannulet). Probably they should be lumped with Golden-faced.

(E) MISHANA TYRANNULET Zimmerius villarejoi
Nice looks at one at Morro de Calzada. VULNERABLE

MARBLE-FACED BRISTLE-TYRANT Phylloscartes ophthalmicus
2 on the Barbet Ridge

VARIAGATED BRISTLE-TYRANT Phylloscartes poecilotis
6 on the Barbet Ridge

MOTTLE-CHEEKED TYRANNULET Phylloscartes ventralis
One at Abra Patricia

OLIVE-STRIPED FLYCATCHER Mionectes olivaceus
1 Near Moyobamba

SLATY-CAPPED FLYCATCHER Leptopogon superciliaris
Two on the Barbet Ridge

BLACK-THROATED TODY-TYRANT Hemitriccus granadensis
Seen well on two days at Abra Patricia

PEARLY-BREASTED TODY-TYRANT Hemitriccus margaritaceiventer
Nice looks at Morro de Calzada

(E) JOHNSON’S TODY-FLYCATCHER Poecilotrccus luluae
3 seen in total – a cracking looking bird right outside the lodge dining room at Abra Patricia. The scientific name is from the late Lulu May Von Hagen for her support of research in avian genetics. ENDANGERED

COMMON TODY-FLYCATCHER Todirostrum cinereum
A few here and there.

YELLOW-OLIVE TOLMOMYIAS Tolmomyias sulphurescens aequatorialis
One along the Barbet Ridge seen twice in the same day

BRAN-COLORED FLYCATCHER Myiophobus fasciatus crypterythrus
3 of the dull crypterythrus race seen in the Maranon

CINNAMON FLYCATCHER Pyrrhomyias cinnamomeus
Seen many times during the trip

(RR) GRAY-BREASTED FLYCTACHER Lathrotriccus griseipectus
One seen well along the La Coipa Road. VULNERABLE

ALDER FLYCATCHER Empidonax alnorum
One at Morro de Calzada

EASTERN WOOD PEWEE Contopus virens
7/8 throughout particularly in the Barbet Ridge

(RR) TUMBES (TROPICAL) PEEWEE Contopus (cinereus) punensis
The SACC says : Ridgely & Greenfield (2001) considered the subspecies punensis of southwestern Ecuador and northwestern Peru to represent a separate species from Contopus cinereus based on vocal differences. Proposal needed. IOC splits.

SMOKE-COLORED PEWEE Contopus fumigatus
On the Barbet ridge and no matter how we tried we could not make then into Blackish Pewee’s! One at Abra Patricia too.

BLACK PHOEBE Sayornis nigricans
Seen a few times during the trip.

VERMILION FLYCATCHER Pyrocephalus rubinus
Fairly common in the Marañon valley and around Cajamarca.

RUFOUS-TAILED TYRANT Knipolegus poecilurus
Excellent views at Abra Patricia

LONG-TAILED TYRANT Colonia colonia

MAROON-BELTED CHAT-TYRANT Ochthoeca thoracia
2 seen by Jim on the Owlet trail. The SACC says: García-Moreno et al. (1998) suggested that the plumage and genetic differences between subspecies groups north and south of the Marañon should be recognized at the species level, with Ochthoeca thoracica the name for the southern species. Ridgely & Tudor (1994) reported that there are also vocal differences that would support this split. Ridgely & Greenfield (2001) and Hilty (2003) further recognized Venezuelan nigrita as a separate species from O. cinnamomeiventris, as done by Cory & Hellmayr (1927); see Zimmer (1937b) for the rationale for treating them all as conspecific based on plumage pattern, the treatment followed by Fitzpatrick (2004). Proposal needed. IOC says: Ochthoeca thoracica is split from O. cinnamomeiventris (Garc�a-Moreno et al. 1998); SACC needs proposal

(E) PIURA CHAT TYRANT Ochthoeca piurae
One seen at Abra Porculla

PIRATIC FLYCATCHER Legatus leucophaius
2 at Morro de Calzada. Piratic because it displaces caciques and others from their nests

SOCIAL FLYCATCHER Myiozetetes similis
Common in the lowlands

GRAY-CAPPED FLYCATCHER Myiozetetes granadensis
One at Morro de Calzadas and 2 on the La Coipa road

GREAT KISKADEE Pitangus sulphuratus
Several sightings.

STREAKED FLYCATCHER Myiodynastes maculatus
An austral migrant seen on the Barbet Ridge and at Morro de Calzada

(RR) BAIRD’S FLYCATCHER Myiodynastes bairdii
One along the coast whilst being interviewed by the police!

TROPICAL KINGBIRD Tyrannus melancholicus
TK! Very common

GRAYISH MOURNER Rhytipterna simplex*
On the Barbet Ridge

DUSKY-CAPPED FLYCATCHER Myiarchus tuberculifer
3 seen in total

SHORT-CRESTED FLYCATCHER Myiarchus ferox
One near Moyobamba

PALE-EDGED FLYCATCHER Myiarchus cephalotes*
Heard at Abra Patricia

(RR) SOOTY-CROWNED FLYCATCHER Myiarchus phaeocephalus interior
Two along the La Coipa road of the interior race

Family: COTINGIDAE (COTINGAS)
GREEN AND BLACK FRUITEATER Pipreola rieferii
Several nice looks at Abra Patricia.

FIERY-THROATED FRUITEATER Pipreola chlrolepidota
Well Barbet ridge was great for Fruiteater’s specifically this one. Parapatric here with the larger below, the male could easily be confused with its orange-red throat – we saw 9 on two days – wow!

SCARLET-BREASTED FRUITEATER Pipreola frontalis
We saw 2 at least of the squamipectus subspecies where the females are barred below as in the female of the above species. For more information see the excellent “Cotingas and Manakins” by Kirwin and Green

(RR) GREY-TAILED PIHA Snowornis subalaris
Seems to be a species on outliers of the Andes – heard commonly and one seen well on the Barbet Ridge on two consecutive days

AMAZONIAN UMBRELLABIRD Cephalopterus ornatus
2 along the Barbet Ridge

Family: PIPRIDAE (MANAKINS)
BLUE-RUMPED (MILKY-RUMPED) MANAKIN Lepidothrix isidorei leucopygia
We saw the leucopygia race commonly ( at least 9) which occurs south of the Maranon gap and apparently only north of Cerulean-capped Manakin. Rigely and Greenfield 2002 suggested his form might be a separate species but there is no hard evidence. Named after Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hillaire (1805-1861 – French zoologist

YUNGAS MANAKIN Chiroxiphia boliviana
Common and a northernmost range extension at the Barbet ridge not in literature

JET MANAKIN Xenopipo unicolor
At least two males feeding in melastomes.

Family: TITYRIDAE (TITYRAS)
MASKED TITYRA Tityra semifasciata
At the barbet ridge

YELLOW-CHEEKED BECARD Pachyramphus xanthogenys
Two on the Barbet Ridge and one female on the La Coipa road. The SACC says: Ridgely & Tudor (1994) and Ridgely & Greenfield (2001) considered Andean xanthogenys a species separate from P. viridis (Green-backed Becard), and this was followed by Fitzpatrick (2004) and Barber & Rice (2007). Proposal needed. IOC splits

WHITE-WINGED BECARD Pachyramphus polychopterus
One seen

Genera: INCERTAE SEDIS
WING-BARRED PIPRITES Piprites chloris
One seen on the barbet Ridge

Family: VIREONIDAE (VIREOS)
RUFOUS-BROWED PEPPERSHRIKE Cyclarhis gujanensis
Commonly heard and two seen

[CHIVI] RED-EYED VIREO Vireo olivaceus (Chivi)
Several. Some classifications (e.g., Pinto 1944) have considered the South American chivi group as a separate species ("Chivi Vireo") from V. olivaceus, or as conspecific with V. flavoviridis (Hamilton 1962). Ridgely & Greenfield (2001) suggested, however, that more than one species may be involved within the South American chivi group.

BROWN-CAPPED VIREO Vireo leucophrys
Four at the Barbet ridge and one at Abra Patricia

Family: CORVIDAE (JAYS)
WHITE-COLLARED JAY Cyanolyca viridicyanus
4 at Abra Patricia

[INCA] GREEN JAY Cyanocorax yncas
Fairly common and several sightings. Ridgely & Greenfield (2001) and Hilty (2003) treated Middle American populations as a separate species, C. luxosus ("Green Jay") from South American C. yncas ("Inca Jay"), but no data presented; they were formerly considered separate species.

Family: HIRUNDINIDAE (SWALLOWS)
GRAY-BREASTED MARTIN Progne chalybea
Fairly common around Tarapoto

BLUE-AND-WHITE SWALLOW Pygochelidon cyanoleuca
Very common

WHITE-BANDED SWALLOW Atticora fasciata
Common near the Huallaga River and at Morro de Calzada

SOUTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW Stelgidopteryx ruficollis
A few at Puente Aguas Verdes and other places

Family: TROGLODYTIDAE (WRENS)
THRUSH-LIKE WREN Campylorhynchus turdinus*

FASCIATED WREN Campylorhynchus fasciatus
At least 4 on the La Coipa road

GRAY-MANTLED WREN Odontorchilus branickii
2 seen nicely in mixed flock on the Barbet Ridge. Named for Konstanty Grzegorz Graf von Branicki, Polish zoologist who planned to found a museum in Warsa

SPECKLE-BREASTED WREN Pheugopedius sclateri
At least 4 on the la Coipa road

(RR) SUPERCILIATED WREN Cantorchilus superciliaris
2 at Abra Porculla

HOUSE WREN Troglodytes aedon
Very common Many authors (e.g., Hellmayr 1934, Pinto 1944, Phelps & Phelps 1950a) formerly treated Neotropical mainland populations as a separate species T. musculus; see also Brumfield and Capparella (1996); this treatment was followed by Brewer (2001) and Kroodsma & Brewer (2005). The Falklands population, T. a. cobbi, might also be best treated as a species (Wood 1993), as was done by Brewer (2001), Mazar Barnett & Pearman (2001), Jaramillo (2003), and Kroodsma & Brewer (2005)

MOUNTAIN WREN Troglodytes solstitialis
At Abra Patricia

GRAY-BREASTED WOOD-WREN Henicorhina leucophrys
Heard a few times and seen on the Barbet Ridge

(RR) BAR-WINGED WOOD-WREN Henicorhina leucoptera
Wow! 4 this wonderful near -endemic at Abra Patricia but played hard to get. NEAR THREATENED

Family POLIOPTILIDAE (GNATCATCHERS)
TROPICAL GNATCATCHER Polioptila plumbea
Common at our last lunch stop along the Pan Am hiway. Note the sexual dimorphism.

MARANON GNATCATCHER Polioptila maior
At least 6 seen along the La Coipa road. Note the lack of sexual dimorphism! The SACC says: Polioptila plumbea likely includes several species (Atwood and Lerman 2006). The subspecies maior of the Marañon Valley (treated as a separate species by Hellmayr 1934) and the bilineata group of northern South American and Middle America may each warrant species recognition, but a published analysis is lacking (Ridgely & Tudor 1989). Even within populations east of the Andes, vocal differences suggest that more than one species is involved (Ridgely & Greenfield 2001, Hilty 2003).

Family CINCLIDAE ( DIPPERS)
WHITE-CAPPED DIPPER Cinclus leucocephalus
One on the Utcubamba river and one at Abra Patricia

Family: TURDIDAE (THRUSHES)
ANDEAN SOLITAIRE Myadestes ralloides
At least one at Abra Patricia.

SWAINSON’S THRUSH Catharus ustulatus
4 on the Barbet Ridge
GREAT THRUSH Turdus fuscater
Common at Abra Patricia

CHIGUANCO THRUSH Turdus chiguanco
Two at Abra Porculla

PALE-BREASTED THRUSH Turdus leucomelas
Two at Morro de Calzada

(RR) PLUMBEOUS-BACKED THRUSH Turdus reevei
One briefly at Abra Porculla

MARANON THRUSH Turdus maranonicus
(RR) Atypical spotted Thrush of the Maranon Canyon. One seen by some.

BLACK-BILLED THRUSH Turdus ignobilis
Common in the lowlands.

Family MIMIDAE (MOCKINGBIRDS)
LONG-TAILED MOCKINGBIRD Mimus longicaudatus
Common in he maranon and along the coast

Family: THRAUPIDAE (TANAGERS)
BLACK-FACED TANAGER Schistochlamys melanopis
2 near Rioja

MAGPIE TANAGER Cissopis leverianus
A few on the Barbet Ridge.

(E) WHITE-BROWED HEMISPINGUS Hemispingus aricularis
The SACC says: The subspecies auricularis is at least as distinct genetically and morphologically, and should presumably given equal taxonomic rank (from Black-capped Hemispingus H. atricapilus) (García-Moreno et al. 2001, García-Moreno & Fjeldså 2003). Proposal needed. IOC splits and thus it becomes a Peruvian endemic. Thata why we could not find Black-capped Hemispingus on our nightly checklist – I had split it on the list.

SUPERCILLIARIED HEMISPINGUS Hemispingus superciliaris
One at Abra Patricia

OLEAGINOUS HEMISPINGUS Hemispingus frontalis
One in a mixed flock on the Grallaria trail at Abra patricia

BLACK-EARED HEMISPINGUS Hemispingus melanotis
One at Abra Patricia in bamboo.

(RR) BUFF-BELLIED TANAGER Thlypopsis inornata
At least 10 of this pretty Tanager along the La Coipa road

GRAY-HEADED TANAGER Eucometis penicillata
One seen n the barbet ridge by Jim

WHITE-LINED TANAGER Tachyphonus rufus
Several

RED-SHOULDERED TANAGER Tachyphonus phoenicius
5 at Morro de Calzadas – a rare bird in Peru restricted to nutrient poor soils. The female is distinctive.

WHITE-WINGED SHRIKE TANAGER Lanio versicolor
A pair leading a canopy flock on the Barbet Ridge.

(E) HUALLAGA TANAGER Ramphocelus melanogaster
A male near Moyobamba.

SILVER-BEAKED TANAGER Ramphocelus carbo
In the lowlands. This and the above locally overlap – right where we were!

BLUE-GRAY TANAGER Thraupis episcopus
Common. We saw the eastern form with white wing patches. From Episcopal blue.

PALM TANAGER Thraupis palmarum
Seen around Moyobamba and the lowlands.

BLUE-CAPPED TANAGER Thraupis cyanocephala
Common at Abra Patricia

BLUE AND YELLOW TANAGER Thraupis bonariensis
2 at Abra Porculla

HOODED MOUNTAIN TANAGER Buthraupis montana
4 of this big Tanager seen at Abra Patricia moving with Mountain Caciques and White-collared Jays which is common

BLUE-WINGED MOUNTAIN TANAGER Anisognathus somptuosus
Common on the Barbet Ridge

LACRIMOSE MOUNTAIN TANAGER Anisognathus lacrymosus
Four at Abra Patricia

(E) YELLOW-SCARFED TANAGER Iridosornis reinhardti
At least 4 of these endemics on two separate days at Abra Patricia.

GRASS-GREEN TANAGER Chlorornis riefferii
Common at Abra Patricia

ORANGE –EARED TANAGER Chlorochrysa calliparaea
A pretty small Tanager seen on the Barbet Ridge

SILVERY (SILVER-BACKED) TANAGER Tangara viridicollis
Common at Abra Patricia.

BLUE-NECKED TANAGER Tangara cyanicollis
Common

Blue-necked Tanager
GREEN AND GOLD TANAGER Tangara schrankii
Around 6 along the barbet Ridge

SPOTTED TANAGER Tangara punctata
10+ on the barbet ridge

PARADISE TANAGER Tangara chilensis
Some excellent views on the Barbet Ridhe and at Abra Patricia. Does not occur in Chile!

BAY-HEADED TANAGER Tangara gyrola
Few seen at here and there

FLAME-FACED TANAGER Tangara parzudakii
Splendid looks at Abra Patricia.

GOLDEN-EARED TANAGER Tangara chrysotis
On consecutive days on the Barbet Ridge

BLUE-BROWED TANAGER Tangara cyanotis
Good looks on the Barbet Ridge of about 15+

SAFFRON-CROWNED TANAGER Tangara xanthocephala
Common at Abra Patricia– here they do have a saffron crown!

GOLDEN-NAPED TANAGER Tangara ruficervix
Two at Abra Patricia

BERYL-SPANGLED TANGER Tangara nigroviridis
Common at Abra Patricia

BLUE AND BLACK TANAGER Tangara vassorii
Common at Abra Malaga

GOLDEN TANAGER Tangara arthus
Common.

SWALLOW TANAGER Tersina viridis
Four at Moro de Calzada

BLACK-FACED DACNIS Dacnis lineata
Two seen

BLUE DACNIS Dacnis cayana
One seen at Morro de Calzada.

PURPLE HONEYCREEPER Cyanerpes caeruleus
At least 4 different birds on the Barbet Ridge and Morro de Calzada

GREEN HONEYCREEPER Chlorophanes spiza
3 at Morro de Calzada

GUIRA TANAGER Hemithraupis guira
Two seen by the creek along the La Coipa Road

CINEREOUS CONEBILL Conirostrum cinereum
A gang of 10+ at Abra Porculla

MASKED FLOWERPIERCER Diglossa cyanea
Common at Abra Patricia

WHITE-SIDED FLOWERPIERCER Diglossa albilatera
One at Abra Patricia

RUSTY FLOWERPIERCER Diglossa sittoides
A fresh plumaged male feeding in an Inga tree on the Barbet Ridge

(E) LITTLE INCA FINCH Incaspiza watkinsi
Around 5 seen in the desert around Bagua. There are 5 of the genus Incaspiza and all are endemic to Peru.

SAFFRON FINCH Sicalis flaveola
Common in certain parts like the Maranon

BLUE-BLACK GRASSQUIT Volatinia jacarina
A few seen in the rice fields

CHESTNUT-BELLIED SEEEDEATER Sporophila castaneiventris
A few in the rice fields near Tarapoto

CHESTNUT-BELLIED SEED FINCH Oryzoborus angolensis
2 near Riojo. Not found in Angola (miss labeled specimen)

RED-CRESTED FINCH Coryphospingus cucullatus
Half a dozen along the La Coipa road.

BANNAQUIT Coereba flaveola
Watch your Bannaquits! We saw intermedia but It changes to mangnirostris in the Maranon

INCERTAE SEDIS
BUFF-THROATED SALTATOR Saltator maximus
Fairly common especially on the Barbet ridge

GRAYISH SALTATOR Saltator coerulescens
Two seen

(RR) BLACK-COWLED SALTATOR Saltator nigriceps
At least 3 at Abra Porculla

STREAKED SALTATOR Saltator striatipectus
Common in the Maranon – the streaked race

Family: EMBERIZINAE (BUNTINGS & SPARROWS)
RUFOUS-COLLARED SPARROW Zonotrichia capensis
Very common

BLACK-CAPPED SPARROW Arremon abeillei nigriceps
We saw the green backed nigriceps form of the Maranon Canyon. The Marañon subspecies nigriceps was once treated as a separate species

CHESTNUT-CAPPED BRUSH-FINCH Arremon brunneinucha
Seen on three occasions at Abra Patricia

RUFOUS-NAPED (YELLOW-BRESTED) BRUSH-FINCH Atlapetes latinuchus
Seen several times around Abra Patricia.

BAY-CROWNED BRUSH-FINCH Atlapetes seebohmi
One at Abra Porculla

(RR) WHITE-WINGED BRUSH-FINCH Atlapetes leucopterus
At least 10 at Abra Porculla

COMMON BUSH-TANAGER Chorospingus ophthalmicus
Fairly common at Abra Patricia an commonly heard displaying at dawn

YELLOW-THROATED BUSH-TANAGER Chlorospingus flavigularis
Several small gangs encountered on the Barbet Ridge

Family CARDINALIDAE (CARDINALS AND ALLIES)
TOOTH-BILLED (HIGHLAND HEPATIC) TANAGER
This is the split from Hepatic tanager seen at the creek along the La Coipa road

SUMMER TANAGER Piranga rubra
Great! A young male along the La Coipa road

WHITE-WINGED TANAGER Piranga leucoptera
2 on the Barbet Ridge

GOLDEN-BELLIED GROSBEAK Pheucticus chrysogaster
A few scattered records.

Family: PARULIDAE (NEW WORLD WARBLERS)
TROPICAL PARULA Parula pitiayumi
Common

BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER Dendroica fusca
Pleasantly common on the Barbet ridge with 10+ seen

CERULEAN WARBLER Dendroica cerulea
One seen in a mixed flock on the Barbet Ridge. VULNERABLE

CANADA WARBLER Wilsonia Canadensis
At least 3 on the barbet Ridge

SLATE-THROATED WHITESTART Myioborus miniatus
Common on the Barbet Ridge

SPECTACLED WHITESTART Myioborus melanocephalus
Common around Abra Patricia.

CITRINE WARBLER Basileuterus luteoviridis
Five at Abra Patricia

RUSSET-CROWNED WARBLER Basileuterus coronatus
Three at Abra Patricia

(RR) THREE-BANDED WARBLER Basileuterus trifasciatus
Half a dozen at Abra Porculla

(RR) GRAY AND OLD WARBLER Basileuterus fraseri
One at Abra Porculla

THREE-STRIPED WARBLER Basileuterus tristriatus
Several encounters particularly on the Barbet Ridge

Family: ICTERIDAE (BLACKBIRDS)
NORTHERN MOUNTAIN CACIQUE Cacicus leucorampus
At Abra Patricia. Cacicus leucoramphus is split from C.chrysonotus (Jaramillo & Burke 1999; Ridgely & Greenfield 2001; Hilty 2003); SACC needs proposal The form we saw ranges from Venezuela to North Peru where we saw it. The other form ranges from South Peru to Bolivia. They meets somewhere but what happens nobody knows.

YELLOW-RUMPED CACIQUE Cacicus cela
Common in the eastern lowlands

YELLOW-BILLED CACIQUE Amblycercus holosericeus
One seen by tony near the Barbet Camp

RUSSET-BACKED OROPENDOLA Psarocolius angustifrons
At Abra Patricia. Ranges higher in the North with the absence of Dusky-Green Oropendola

CRESTED OROPENDOLA Psarocolius decumanus
Several sightings

SCRUB BLACKBIRD Dives warszewiczi
Common in the Maranon Canyon

Family: FRINGILLIDAE (FINCHES)
HOODED SISKIN Sporagra magellanica
10+ At Abra Porculla. The SACC says: Recent genetic data (Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2007, Nguembock et al. 2009) found that Carduelis as currently constituted is not monophyletic and that resurrection of Spinus is required, and Chesser et al. (2009) followed this by placing all New World goldfinches and siskins in Carduelis. Arnaiz-Villena et al. (2007) also showed that the Neotropical species of Carduelis likely form a monophyletic group that might not include C. psaltria, which forms a strongly supported group with the two North American goldfinches, C. tristis and C. lawrencei. Nguembock et al. (2009) found that C. psaltria was sister to the Neotropical group (but did not sample C. tristis or C. lawrencei); they also found that Spinus was more closely related to Loxia than to the New World goldfinch-siskin group, and that the latter was more closely related to true Serinus (at least in their concatenated data set). Therefore, they recommended that Sporagra Reichenbach, 1850, be resurrected for this group. SACC proposal passed to resurrect Sporagra

LESSER GOLDFINCH Astragalinus psaltria
One along the La Coipa road

PURPLE-THROATED EUPHONIA Euphonia chlorotica
4 near Moyobamba

ORANGE-BELLIED EUPHONIA Euphonia xanthogaster
Common

MAMMAL LIST

(E) RIO MAYO TITI-MONKEY Callicebus oenanthe.
2 near Rioja – wow a primate tick and a good endemic one!

TAYRA Eira barbera
One visiting the fruit feeders in vain at Abra Patricia

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